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    Power supply for devices

    I am getting too many wall warts powering my Ocelot and satellite modules. I'd like to use a common power supply and use one four wire cable to both communicate with and power my other modules. Can anyone suggest a good power supply, or give me the formula to figure out what I need ?

    Thanks...
    Don

    #2
    you would need a separate supply for each of the different voltages. Are all of your wall warts say 12v DC? then simply add the ratings of each wallwart. 1000ma (milliamp) equals 1 amp, so for example if one wart says 500ma and another says 750ma that would equal 1.25 amps. Note some warts are AC and some are DC and can range in voltage from 4.5 volts to 16 volts or higher. You must keep the voltages the same, also you will need to check polarity on the DC warts... not all warts are created equal and not all warts follow the same polarity (since in the manufacturer's eyes, you should only use the supplied wart)

    What you want to do can be done, just be sure you only supply the required voltage and have a source that can handle the required current
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      #3
      How about an old PC power supply...Would that work?
      Don

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        #4
        for the 12v and 5 volt, but you still have to keep track of your amps. if the power supply can supply 200 watts at 12 volts, that is 16 amps. if the 5 volt side is rated at 100 watts that is 20 amps

        amps = watts divided by volts
        watts = amps times volts

        some warts are AC, some warts are DC, you can't mix the 2
        Over The Hill
        What Hill?
        Where?
        When?
        I Don't Remember Any Hill

        Virtualized Server 2k3 Ent X86 Guest on VMWare ESXi 4.1 with 3 SunRay thin clients as access points - HSPro 2.4.0.48 - ZTroller - ACRF2 (3 WGL 800's) - iAutomate RFID - Ledam - MLHSPlugin - Ultra1wire - RainRelay8 - TI103 - Ultramon - WAF-AB8SS - jvESS (11 zones) - Bitwise Controls BC4 - with 745 Total Devices - 550 Events - 104 scripts - 78 ZWave devices - 42 X10 devices - 76 DS10a's 3 RFXSenors and 32 Motion Sensors

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          #5
          Thanks, that helps a lot.

          Originally posted by jackpod View Post
          for the 12v and 5 volt, but you still have to keep track of your amps. if the power supply can supply 200 watts at 12 volts, that is 16 amps. if the 5 volt side is rated at 100 watts that is 20 amps

          amps = watts divided by volts
          watts = amps times volts

          some warts are AC, some warts are DC, you can't mix the 2
          Don

          Comment

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