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  • 9v battery power to the NodeMCU

    Hi,
    Can I power the Nodemcu with a 9v battery on G/VIN Pin?

    Thanks,
    Aldo

  • #2
    I believe on most of the NodeMCU ESP12 boards there is a regulator (there is on mine) and that regulator is a SPX3819. That regulator has a operating +16V input maximum rating so it should be good on 9V. Be aware that on some of the clone boards the parts of the official circuit diagrams may not actually be the ones on the board (swapped for cheaper).

    Try it and if it turns very hot the MCU boards on eBay can be yours for very little.
    My Plugins:

    Pushover 3P | DoorBird 3P | Current Cost 3P | Velleman K8055 3P | LAMetric 3P | Garadget 3P | Hive 3P |
    Yeelight 3P | Nanoleaf 3P

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    • #3
      thanks MrHappy, I believe mine has it, I took a picture but I can not see the number, I bought these from Amazon ESP8266 Hiletgo Version $8.79
      If this is the case, would you apply the 9v on these G/VIN Pin?

      Aldo

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      • #4
        Also remember that a 9V battery has between 400-600MAH of power and a NodeMCU draws a minimum of 35MA with upwards of 250-300MA during packet operations. Unless the NodeMCU is put in deep sleep, a 9V battery can only run it for 10-15 hours. It also draws over 300MA at startup each time it negotiates a WiFi connection. So, while it can run on a 9V battery, it cannot do it for long.

        A better battery might be a 18650 3.7v Li-ion at 2500-4000MAH, but that would only run the board for 30-40 hours.
        Randy Prade
        Aurora, CO
        Prades.net

        PHLocation - Pushover - EasyTrigger - UltraECM3 - Ultra1Wire3 - Arduino

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        • #5
          A suggestion would be great here. What I'm trying to accomplish is having a portable Soil moisture sensor attached to Arduino Nodemcu. What is the beat way to accomplish it using a portable battery?

          Aldo

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          • #6
            Originally posted by aldo View Post
            A suggestion would be great here. What I'm trying to accomplish is having a portable Soil moisture sensor attached to Arduino Nodemcu. What is the beat way to accomplish it using a portable battery?

            Aldo
            If you want it outside permanently on battery then I'm not sure WiFi is for you, it is a power hog and even if you were to implement some power saving in terms of putting the device to sleep etc I would still be amazed if you got more than a week or two on battery. Technologies like BTLE are designed to be ultra low power and send data although they are a bit more complex to implement.
            My Plugins:

            Pushover 3P | DoorBird 3P | Current Cost 3P | Velleman K8055 3P | LAMetric 3P | Garadget 3P | Hive 3P |
            Yeelight 3P | Nanoleaf 3P

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            • #7
              If you are thinking of a hand held tool that you use for a few minutes and then are done, this would work. Put an ON/OFF switch so you can turn power on and off to the board from the battery.

              Rather than a 9V battery, I think I would consider 4 rechargeable AA bats.

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              • #8
                @aldo

                I just made a proto for a battery powered nodeMCU. I went with 9V as that was what I had parts for. Feeding +9V into Vin and ground into GND with a DPST toggle switch for both (I know, overkill, I had the switch). It works running my standard sketch. The thing I find really great is that if I toggle the power on, it joins the network really fast and starts updating devices. However, the on-board voltage regulator gets warm as does the whole board after a min or so. Not hot enough that I would be concerned of a safety problem. Rather, the concern is that if I am generating heat, I am using and wasting battery power which would not last very long on a small battery. My saving grace might be that I am thinking and designing a device that is mobile but that runs on internal power. Switch it on, does something, switch it off. Likely 15s or so. Might have to incorporate an LED.

                Did you made a 9V battery powered board? If so, what are your results?

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                • #9
                  Good morning logbuilder, you were fast than I posting these results. I indeed went 9 v and I did the same thing you did. I found the 9v covers with the build in switches on the cover, it works great. As you mentioned, the battery runs pretty quick, about 30 minutes run time enough for my project.
                  Thanks,
                  Aldo

                  Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk

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