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  • #16
    Originally posted by Mike Johnson View Post
    I've not done that with an Arduino, but my first thought would be to be very careful about voltages between the RGB amplifier and the Arduino. The Arduino is very sensitive to proper voltage and current maximums. It's fairly easy to fry outputs if limits are exceeded. Which RGB amp are you using?

    Mike
    Some Amazon "special" product. I have opened it and saw that it has optocouplers. Nothing else I know about it. No model number. Just 12/24V 6A per channel

    Sent from my EML-L09 using Tapatalk

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Tim View Post
      I set outputs 3,5 and 6 as digital outputs and I'm getting voltage readings when outputs are set to low. Obviously something is wrong with board.
      Keep in mind that digital outputs are 'low' or 'high', not necessarily 0V and 5V. There is a range that is 'low' and another range that is 'high'. https://www.arduino.cc/reference/en/...nts/constants/

      Mike

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Tim View Post
        Some Amazon "special" product. I have opened it and saw that it has optocouplers. Nothing else I know about it. No model number. Just 12/24V 6A per channel

        Sent from my EML-L09 using Tapatalk
        I'll assume from your description that the load side will take 12/24V 6A (i.e., like a 12V led RGB light strip, etc.). The input side would need to take Arduino's 5V logic for control, and draw no more than the Arduino maximum available current (40mA, I think). And, based on your earlier description, if the setup is common anode (positive), you would need to connect Arduino 5V to the 'common', then each of your 3 pins to the R, G, and B inputs. Again, I have not done all of this, and not knowing the exact details of the RGB amplifier could mean some of this is not accurate.

        Mike

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Mike Johnson View Post

          I'll assume from your description that the load side will take 12/24V 6A (i.e., like a 12V led RGB light strip, etc.). The input side would need to take Arduino's 5V logic for control, and draw no more than the Arduino maximum available current (40mA, I think). And, based on your earlier description, if the setup is common anode (positive), you would need to connect Arduino 5V to the 'common', then each of your 3 pins to the R, G, and B inputs. Again, I have not done all of this, and not knowing the exact details of the RGB amplifier could mean some of this is not accurate.

          Mike
          Mike,

          I think that arduino gets overloaded with input of the repeater. Also I think that I will make module that transfers common positive to common negative supply. My arduino is about 4 years old and I'm not sure that is working properly. When outputs are down, I still have 2 - 3 Volts on some of the outputs.

          Are you familiar with modbus protocol?

          Sent from my EML-L09 using Tapatalk

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          • #20
            1) That is not a v2 shield
            2) An RGB amplifier requires PWM inputs but usually cannot be driven directly by Arduino pins. The optical isolators may perform with Arduino PWM outputs, but they also may load down the outputs. I have used the Velleman RGB shield to drive RGB strips. You can also use general purpose MOSFETS.
            3) The digital outputs are normally high (5V on Arduino Uno and Mega, 3.3V on NodeMCU) when on and low when off, but they can be inverted in configuration
            4) as was stated above, the Ethernet Shield requires certain pins and they cannot be used. From the help:

            “Arduino communicates with both the W5100 and SD card using the SPI bus (through the ICSP header). This is on D11, D12, and D13 on "classic" format Arduino models such as the Duemilanove, and pins D50, D51, and D52 on the Arduino Mega.
            D10 is used to select the W5100 and cannot be used for general I/O.
            D4 is used for the SD card and can only be used for general I/O if the SD slot is not occupied.D2 is used if a solder bridge is placed across the "INT" pads to connect it to the W5100's INT pin.
            On the Mega, the hardware SS pin, D53, is not used to select either the W5100 or the SD card, but it must be kept as an output or the SPI interface won't work.
            Although not used by most SD card libraries, A0 is connected to the SD slot's write protect (WP) pin and A1 is connected to the card detect switch. Both are pulled high by 10k resistors on the Ethernet shield. These pins therefore cannot be used for analog input with the shield unless they are bent back or clipped off before inserting the shield into the arduino. Additionally, if a user's circuit uses these pins for digital IO, the pullups may cause problems for existing circuitry”

            Here is the Velleman K01 RGB shield:

            https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
            Randy Prade
            Aurora, CO
            Prades.net

            PHLocation - Pushover - EasyTrigger - UltraECM3 - Ultra1Wire3 - Arduino

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Tim View Post
              Mike,

              I think that arduino gets overloaded with input of the repeater. Also I think that I will make module that transfers common positive to common negative supply. My arduino is about 4 years old and I'm not sure that is working properly. When outputs are down, I still have 2 - 3 Volts on some of the outputs.

              Are you familiar with modbus protocol?

              Sent from my EML-L09 using Tapatalk
              No, but a little googling showed me the basics. Looks interesting. Unfortunately, I can't help much with that!

              Mike

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by rprade View Post
                1) That is not a v2 shield
                2) An RGB amplifier requires PWM inputs but usually cannot be driven directly by Arduino pins. The optical isolators may perform with Arduino PWM outputs, but they also may load down the outputs. I have used the Velleman RGB shield to drive RGB strips. You can also use general purpose MOSFETS.
                3) The digital outputs are normally high (5V on Arduino Uno and Mega, 3.3V on NodeMCU) when on and low when off, but they can be inverted in configuration
                4) as was stated above, the Ethernet Shield requires certain pins and they cannot be used. From the help:

                “Arduino communicates with both the W5100 and SD card using the SPI bus (through the ICSP header). This is on D11, D12, and D13 on "classic" format Arduino models such as the Duemilanove, and pins D50, D51, and D52 on the Arduino Mega.
                D10 is used to select the W5100 and cannot be used for general I/O.
                D4 is used for the SD card and can only be used for general I/O if the SD slot is not occupied.D2 is used if a solder bridge is placed across the "INT" pads to connect it to the W5100's INT pin.
                On the Mega, the hardware SS pin, D53, is not used to select either the W5100 or the SD card, but it must be kept as an output or the SPI interface won't work.
                Although not used by most SD card libraries, A0 is connected to the SD slot's write protect (WP) pin and A1 is connected to the card detect switch. Both are pulled high by 10k resistors on the Ethernet shield. These pins therefore cannot be used for analog input with the shield unless they are bent back or clipped off before inserting the shield into the arduino. Additionally, if a user's circuit uses these pins for digital IO, the pullups may cause problems for existing circuitry”

                Here is the Velleman K01 RGB shield:

                https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
                Hi rprade,
                Thank you for info.
                One question, can I install network shield on top of KA01 RGB?

                Sent from my EML-L09 using Tapatalk

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Mike Johnson View Post

                  No, but a little googling showed me the basics. Looks interesting. Unfortunately, I can't help much with that!

                  Mike
                  Thank you for all help today.

                  I didn't accomplish what I wanted but definitely I learned few things.

                  Best Regards
                  Tim

                  Sent from my EML-L09 using Tapatalk

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Tim View Post
                    Thank you for all help today.

                    I didn't accomplish what I wanted but definitely I learned few things.

                    Best Regards
                    Tim

                    Sent from my EML-L09 using Tapatalk
                    You're welcome. I hope you get the rest figured out...

                    Mike

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Tim View Post
                      Hi rprade,
                      Thank you for info.
                      One question, can I install network shield on top of KA01 RGB?

                      Sent from my EML-L09 using Tapatalk
                      Actually it goes on top of the Ethernet shield. The Ethernet shield has the little 6-pin header at the back of the board that must connect directly to the Arduino.
                      Randy Prade
                      Aurora, CO
                      Prades.net

                      PHLocation - Pushover - EasyTrigger - UltraECM3 - Ultra1Wire3 - Arduino

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Are you measuring the pins with a DVM? A DVM displays an average voltage, so if the pin is changing rapidly (as it will if PWM is active), you might see what looks like an incorrect voltage. Because of how DVM's sample, the voltage will often jump around a bit.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by zwolfpack View Post
                          Are you measuring the pins with a DVM? A DVM displays an average voltage, so if the pin is changing rapidly (as it will if PWM is active), you might see what looks like an incorrect voltage. Because of how DVM's sample, the voltage will often jump around a bit.
                          Hi,
                          Yes, I was using digital meter. I agree, but still when outputs are low, shouldn't show 2.5V.

                          I have ordered new board.

                          Will post results.

                          Best Regards
                          Tim

                          Sent from my EML-L09 using Tapatalk

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