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Dimming PWM Led 220AC

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  • Dimming PWM Led 220AC

    Hi
    I wounder if anyone have any working dimming system for 220 AC using pwm on arduino mega
    I also don't want to use api sketch
    Are this possible to do just using the RGB control in the plugin?

  • #2
    You would need an additional module that can translate the 5V DC PWM signal into a Triac dimmer. Such things exist and can be good value, search something like Arduino triac dimmer on Amazon or similar. I believe I once saw a four channel module for ~40-50 USD.

    Then you would create a pin as PWM output in the plugin config. Connect that PWM pin to the signal in of the dimmer module, and wire the AC globe circuit to the triac. I've been considering doing this as a temporary improvement for a couple of rooms that are years away from proper renovation.

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    • #3
      Okay thx.
      I doing renovation just now. do you think I still should go with this or try to find diffrent way that maybe better?
      for longterm?

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      • #4
        I have some high output outdoor fixtures that have a 0 to 10 VDC dimming signal input. I am using Arduinos and some optical couplers to make this work. It works very well.

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        • #5
          sounds intresting what componet do you use ?
          joegr

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          • #6
            I made one using a couple of opto-couplers and an RC filter on the fly. However, here's a circuit that should be simpler if you don't need the isolation (you shouldn't).
            https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=563795.0

            Here's an example of a light with 0-10V DC dimming signal input.
            https://www.amazon.com/dp/B079G52CW5...v_ov_lig_dp_it
            Note that with this one you will also need a SSR to be able to turn it all the way off. Others will turn off when the DC dim signal is at or near 0V.

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            • #7
              For long term it's important to consider a future where you sell the property. How annoyed is a potential buyer going to be at an obscure lighting system that a regular electrician won't know how to deal with? Are you going to incur costs returning it to "normal" in order to sell?

              If you can easily access your ceiling or roof cavity, you might want to consider at least leaving spare wiring in the walls to the switch boxes, so if the circuits have to be reverted it can be done easily with just a few joins.

              Also ensure you have a manual circuit switch somewhere in the setup, so that any light can be turned on or off in the event that either the Arduino or HomeSeer experiences a failure.

              This kind of thinking should always be applied to any smart home system, regardless of the specific control component.

              Personally I use the Arduino PWM output to control LED drivers directly (Meanwell LDD-H), which are decoupled from LED COBs (Bridgelux Vero). The advantage is that I can centralise all the drivers with the Arduino, and all the driver to COB wiring is SELV, meaning I can run it myself.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Fellhahn View Post
                For long term it's important to consider a future where you sell the property. How annoyed is a potential buyer going to be at an obscure lighting system that a regular electrician won't know how to deal with? Are you going to incur costs returning it to "normal" in order to sell?

                If you can easily access your ceiling or roof cavity, you might want to consider at least leaving spare wiring in the walls to the switch boxes, so if the circuits have to be reverted it can be done easily with just a few joins.

                Also ensure you have a manual circuit switch somewhere in the setup, so that any light can be turned on or off in the event that either the Arduino or HomeSeer experiences a failure.

                This kind of thinking should always be applied to any smart home system, regardless of the specific control component.

                Personally I use the Arduino PWM output to control LED drivers directly (Meanwell LDD-H), which are decoupled from LED COBs (Bridgelux Vero). The advantage is that I can centralise all the drivers with the Arduino, and all the driver to COB wiring is SELV, meaning I can run it myself.

                Very intressent are you just buying COBs or finish product with case and heatsink?.

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                • #9
                  I purchase the individual components and assemble them myself into a "downlight". I use quotes because the driver is not housed inside the assembled light but rather on a central board.

                  Most things are purchased from DigiKey. A list of components:

                  COB: Bridgelux Vero 10 (gen 7)
                  Driver: Meanwell LDD-H
                  Heatsink: Mechatronix (purchased separately)
                  COB holder: Ledil
                  Reflector and Lens: Ledil
                  Housing: Generic, purchased from Alibaba.
                  Driver circuit boards are purchased from Rapid LED.

                  Some pics:

                  Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20190619_192655.jpg Views:	5 Size:	63.7 KB ID:	1320888Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20190619_192635.jpg Views:	5 Size:	53.6 KB ID:	1320887Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20190716_201149.jpg Views:	6 Size:	31.8 KB ID:	1320889 ​​​​

                  I have another pic of the central "board" but the forums giving me grief over file size and I'm on mobile.

                  Edit: Here it is:

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	GP3_20190602_150615.jpg
Views:	31
Size:	116.4 KB
ID:	1321023

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                  • #10
                    Also a big part of why I do this is to have total control over the chip that goes in the light. I can guarantee a certain colour temperature, 90+ CRI, and lumen level in each light. I can choose from 2700, 3000, 3500, 4000, 5000 Kelvin chips. Most consumer globes give you maybe two choices, 70-80 CRI, and the temperature consistency from one globe to another is poor at best.

                    And the PWM dimming garantees precise, consistent dimming. I know 10% brightness will look the same today as tomorrow. Also the colour temperature doesn't shift as you dim, like it does with current cut dimming. And I can turn on to any dim level, no need to "startup" at full brightness then dim down. It's a much more premium feel to the dimming experience. And the extremely high CRI COBs give a premium feel to the quality of light. My wife even agrees and she thinks I've been a total over the top nerd about all this

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                    • #11
                      Very nice setup you have. Think I need change man plans little

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