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Arduino Plugin feature requests

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  • DMcKnight
    replied
    Originally posted by enigmatheatre View Post
    Doug what version are you running as there is code to trap bus errors in the beta. If you are running it then capture and send me a debug log so I can see what is going on.

    Greig.

    Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

    Debug log sent by email.
    Regards
    Doug

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by DMcKnight View Post
    I'm using 1.0.0.85. If the 1.0.0.95 Beta is compatible with the 1.0.0.85 Arduino sketches I'll install it right now, otherwise I'll have to wait until I'm next home.

    Doug
    It *should* be just fine. The 1.0.0.95 version uses V1.0.0.84 sketches.

    Leave a comment:


  • DMcKnight
    replied
    Originally posted by enigmatheatre View Post
    Doug what version are you running as there is code to trap bus errors in the beta. If you are running it then capture and send me a debug log so I can see what is going on.

    Greig.

    Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

    I'm using 1.0.0.85. If the 1.0.0.95 Beta is compatible with the 1.0.0.85 Arduino sketches I'll install it right now, otherwise I'll have to wait until I'm next home.

    Doug

    Leave a comment:


  • enigmatheatre
    replied
    Doug what version are you running as there is code to trap bus errors in the beta. If you are running it then capture and send me a debug log so I can see what is going on.

    Greig.

    Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by DMcKnight View Post
    Thanks for the suggestion. I have already tried many different resistance values, including as low as 1k. I've also tried a small resistor in series with the data pin, which I've found helpful with one wire before.

    I think the proper hardware solution is to use a "real" one-wire bus master with an active pull-up, but this is so close to working I think a simple software trap would do the trick.

    regards
    Doug
    Give Greig some time. I'll bet he can figure out how to trap OneWire errors within the code.

    FWIW I have 4 DS18B20 sensors on a Cat 5 cable of about the same length, with a 2.2K pull-up and haven't seen an error. This is on a test board. For my production temperature sensors I use EDS OWServers because they are so darn reliable.

    Leave a comment:


  • DMcKnight
    replied
    Originally posted by mihaium View Post
    Hello.

    Forse the long distance is necessary change the pull-up resistor. Put the 1 kohm resistor.

    Inviato dal mio SM-G920F utilizzando Tapatalk

    Thanks for the suggestion. I have already tried many different resistance values, including as low as 1k. I've also tried a small resistor in series with the data pin, which I've found helpful with one wire before.

    I think the proper hardware solution is to use a "real" one-wire bus master with an active pull-up, but this is so close to working I think a simple software trap would do the trick.

    regards
    Doug

    Leave a comment:


  • mihaium
    replied
    Hello.

    Forse the long distance is necessary change the pull-up resistor. Put the 1 kohm resistor.

    Inviato dal mio SM-G920F utilizzando Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • DMcKnight
    replied
    Error trapping on 1-wire temperature measurments

    Hi Greig,

    I've used Arduinos in the past to measure temperature on multiple one-wire sensors and I'm aware of the limitations of "bit banging" with a single output (as distinct from using a more sophisticated active pull-up).

    As it is, I've got three temperature sensors on a cat 5 cable that's about 15 meters long and I've got it *almost* working perfectly. By that, I mean that I can measure temperatures every 6 minutes and only get about 1 or 2 measurements per day that show up as 9999999.

    So, my question is: can these erroneous readings be trapped and handled sensibly somehow? I expect it could all be done in a script, but it seems more appropriate for it to be handled close to the sensor, such as in the plug-in. Perhaps this kind of reading could cause a warning to be written to the log, and the measurement re-tried?

    Regards
    Doug

    Leave a comment:


  • Daggy67
    replied
    Update help file for pinouts

    There are different configurations for the pinouts depending on USB, ethernet Mega or UNO. It's taken me some time find what is needed selecting inputs or outputs in the board setup to get it working depending on my set up analog or digital. It would be good reference to update the help file reflecting these differences. Great plugin always works as advertised, much to learn but satisfaction is guaranteed.

    Leave a comment:


  • enigmatheatre
    replied
    Originally posted by piever View Post
    Hello Greig,

    I have a chipkit max32 board and would like to connect this board to HS3.
    The latest rev http://www.chipkit.net/started is here.
    I tested this version but its sees not to connect to hs3.

    The newer do not support chipkit 32-bit boards.
    Is it possible to use this board?

    Regards piever. Netherland
    Emailed a reply.

    Leave a comment:


  • piever
    replied
    Support of chipkit max32 board

    Hello Greig,

    I have a chipkit max32 board and would like to connect this board to HS3.
    The latest rev http://www.chipkit.net/started is here.
    I tested this version but its sees not to connect to hs3.

    The newer do not support chipkit 32-bit boards.
    Is it possible to use this board?

    Regards piever. Netherland

    Leave a comment:


  • bsnedek
    replied
    Addressing

    Please consider changing your addressing scheme. In most of HomeSeer a comma"," is a field separator. Most other addins or systems use a "-' dash in their addressing. Even ":" can cause some issues.

    Jon00's stuff, Z-Wave stuff, Homeseer's stuff all use dash "-" not comma "," or Colon ":" when you scripting or even eventing the commas and colons in your address scheme cause real issues.

    TIA

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by jimbell View Post
    There are many power transistors now available with completely isolated tabs. That is to say that the mounting tab has no connection to any of the 3 pins in the device. This is ideal, especially for experimenters. You don't have to "float" the heatsink with insulators, which was a real pain on some projects. Attached is an example datasheet with an isolated tab power mosfet. This is not the one in question, but I found this with a quick google search. If I were looking for one to do a project, I would not choose the 200v part.
    Agreed. That is why I said "most T0-220 packages". I was aware that there are many using isolated mounting tabs. If I was going to purchase one for a project, that would certainly be a consideration. The reason I used the devices I did was expediency, they were in my parts bin. I bought a lot of 50 for $5 a year or two ago when a parts house was going out of business. I also know that device performs very well in high current PWM applications, because I have built quite a few using it. For low voltage applications, having the Drain of an N-Channel exposed is of little concern, unless you mount several to a common heatsink.

    Leave a comment:


  • jimbell
    replied
    You are correct, however....

    Originally posted by rprade View Post
    Sorry, I missed this post when you made it. Like most TO-220 packages, the tab is either the Collector or in the case of a MOSFET, the Drain.

    Since the Drain is the return path for the LED "-" or GND side, the heatsink would be at approximately 12V, but current limited by the LEDs attached and that is floating, having no reference to earth ground. Since the 12V is supplied by a switch-mode power supply, it is completely isolated from the house current. I see no harm of electrical shock, no reason to be concerned that the heat sink is at that potential. If you wanted to, the tab could be insulated from the heat sink, but that was not of any concern in my application (in my opinion).
    There are many power transistors now available with completely isolated tabs. That is to say that the mounting tab has no connection to any of the 3 pins in the device. This is ideal, especially for experimenters. You don't have to "float" the heatsink with insulators, which was a real pain on some projects. Attached is an example datasheet with an isolated tab power mosfet. This is not the one in question, but I found this with a quick google search. If I were looking for one to do a project, I would not choose the 200v part.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by jimbell View Post
    Do these have electrically isolated tabs?
    Sorry, I missed this post when you made it. Like most TO-220 packages, the tab is either the Collector or in the case of a MOSFET, the Drain.

    Since the Drain is the return path for the LED "-" or GND side, the heatsink would be at approximately 12V, but current limited by the LEDs attached and that is floating, having no reference to earth ground. Since the 12V is supplied by a switch-mode power supply, it is completely isolated from the house current. I see no harm of electrical shock, no reason to be concerned that the heat sink is at that potential. If you wanted to, the tab could be insulated from the heat sink, but that was not of any concern in my application (in my opinion).

    Leave a comment:

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