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How do I send UDP messages ?

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  • How do I send UDP messages ?

    This is a new area for me so be gentle. I am trying to send UDP messages from Homeseer over my LAN to a Barix Exstreamer www.exstreamer.com that will allow me to control my MP3 playback using Homeseer.

    I have the list of UDP messages, I also have a fixed IP address, 192.168.1.10 for the Exstreamer, I just don't know how to push the messages to it.

    Thanks

    Nigel

  • #2
    Nigel,

    I've knocked up a plugin which should allow you to do what you require.

    visit my website for details and download.

    How do you like the Exstreamer and where did you get it? I would quite like one myself but I didn't think there was a UK distributor yet.

    Justin.

    Comment


    • #3
      Justin,

      Thanks for doing this... I am not able to see where I should select the plugin in the options menu, can you be more specific.

      Can you also confirm how I would send a 'C 3 Return', this is my interpretation of the exstreamer instructions where I beleive C = Character, 3 is the character and Return is a carrage return character.

      I have set up an event to run based on receiving an X10 from the Pronto using

      &hs.plugin ("UDP Broadcast").SendUDP "12303","192.168.1.10","?????"

      Thanks for your help

      Nigel

      Comment


      • #4
        Nigel,

        The plugin should be available in view -> Options -> Interfaces -> Select device to add (dropdown).
        Once selected it is added to the active interfaces.

        To send your the command you require, try:
        &hs.plugin ("UDP Broadcast").SendUDP "12303","192.168.1.10","C 3" & chr(13)

        Having had a quick look at the docs, it looks like the port should be 12301 for UDP and perhaps "c=3" although I don't really understand it.

        Justin.

        Comment


        • #5
          Justin,

          I have copied the OCX into the HS directory, there are a number of OCXs there as well, 11 including UDPBroadcast

          When I look in the options box in Homeseer I only have 4 choices, Homevision, MR26A RF Receiver, Applied Digital Ocelot and Smartlinc Templinc, none of which have been selected. I have restarted HS once the OCX was copied accross. I did not restart windows although I will try that now....

          Any oher suggestions ?

          Nigel

          Comment


          • #6
            Justin,

            My homeseer machine did not have MSWINSCK.OCX in the windows/system directory. This showed up as an error message in the error log.

            I copied from another machine and UDP Broadcast appears in the drop down list...

            Nigel

            Comment


            • #7
              Justin, success at 10:45 new years eve....

              the command that needs to be sent to pause the exstreamer is

              &hs.plugin ("UDP Broadcast").SendUDP "12301","192.168.1.10", chr(99) & chr(61) & chr(51) & chr(13)

              99= c
              61= =
              51= 3
              13= Return

              by changing the value '51' all functions can, I hope, be used.

              Thanks again for your help, I couldn't have done it without you...

              Nigel

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              • #8
                What exactly is UDP messages?

                -Rupp

                --- Have a Merry Christmas and a Happy new Year ---

                ...it was a holy night.
                -Rupp
                sigpic

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                • #9
                  UDP (User Datagram Protocol) is a communications protocol that offers a limited amount of service when messages are exchanged between computers in a network that uses the Internet Protocol (IP). UDP is an alternative to the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and, together with IP, is sometimes referred to as UDP/IP. Like the Transmission Control Protocol, UDP uses the Internet Protocol to actually get a data unit (called a datagram) from one computer to another. Unlike TCP, however, UDP does not provide the service of dividing a message into packets (datagrams) and reassembling it at the other end. Specifically, UDP doesn't provide sequencing of the packets that the data arrives in. This means that the application program that uses UDP must be able to make sure that the entire message has arrived and is in the right order. Network applications that want to save processing time because they have very small data units to exchange (and therefore very little message reassembling to do) may prefer UDP to TCP. The Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) uses UDP instead of TCP.
                  UDP provides two services not provided by the IP layer. It provides port numbers to help distinguish different user requests and, optionally, a checksum capability to verify that the data arrived intact.

                  In the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communication model, UDP, like TCP, is in layer 4, the Transport Layer.

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                  • #10
                    Is this how "Windows Messaging" works in NT?

                    Could this transport mechanism be used to build a chat plugin in HomeSeer? Say, To chat with other HS users over the net?..........................JG

                    The Garage
                    HS2PRO - Ocelot, SecuIR, Secu16, Attendence Management Alarm Interface, X-10, LCD Studio VFD Display, 3 Apexis IP Cams, Custom Software Interfaces, GMQ Geiger Graphing
                    HS3PRO - Testing

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                    • #11
                      1. Yes. Grabbed this from Microsoft, and you can read the inverse effect: <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Blocking Network Access to the Messenger Service
                      If you are not familiar with the concepts behind firewalls, communications protocols, and ports, a basic introduction is available here.

                      Most, if not all, personal firewalls will block the doors used to send these messages into your computer without any special configuration. In other words, once installed, you'll be protected. Consult your firewall documentation for details. Windows XP is shipped with a firewall called the Internet Connection Firewall but be sure to make sure it is enabled.

                      Another way it may be possible to block these messages is to use the advanced TCP/IP security and filtering options in the Windows NT, 2000, and XP network control panel.

                      In general, blocking ports TCP-139 and UDP-135 seems to prevent delivery of these messages although TCP-445 may also be necessary.


                      Microsoft Outlook clients talk to Microsoft Exchange servers on TCP 135
                      At least one source has said that Exchange uses the Messenger service to deliver "new mail" notifications to Outlook clients.
                      Windows file sharing requires TCP 139 or 445 depending upon OS
                      Server operators, managed networks, and people with custom applications should take great care with blocking ports. Domains and trusts require several of these ports for authentication and other things per Microsoft Knowledgebase Article Q179442. Active Directory replication uses TCP 135 per KB Q224196. Some third party applications, particularly management oriented ones may require TCP 135 (Example). In general, remote access to RPC, COM+, and DCOM applications will probably require TCP 135.
                      Remote management utilities often need TCP 139 and possibly other netbios ports open
                      Windows Media Technology (also known as NetShow) uses TCP 135 for the Windows Media Administrator and Windows Media Encoder per KB Q189416 and this article.
                      Microsoft Office suite and other applications are DCOM aware. You may disable functionality that is in use by blocking ports.
                      UDP 137 is needed for netbios name resolution. It and 138 may be needed for ease of use access to netbios resources on the network.
                      Some RPC based services exist on high ports (those greater than 1023). It may be possible that those services can be accessed and exploited directly bypassing the mapper on 135. A high UDP port was seen to open when a net send command was used to send a message to a local machine so maybe it is not open all the time. The port changed with each use of the net send command. This might have something to do with a callback configuration in the application. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>



                      2. Yes. Although the primary protocol for everything on the internet is TCP/IP, UDP is also used. For instance, the default port for yahoo voice is 5000 UDP.

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                      • #12
                        OK, This falls in line with the issues that the spammers are exploiting, where XP users are seeing spam entering their computers, without them surfing on the net. Just having your XP computer connected to the net, and windows messaging enabled allows the spammers to "hit" you with a pop up ad. I have dealt with this on customers computers. Turning off windows messaging is the MS "FIX". I suspect that thetre is a better way to "block" these pop-ups, by blocking ports instead. While still leaving windows messaging enabled. Is this true?.

                        Also, I have read that MS does not want all these UDP ports "blocked", because, this is how XP sends it's """"DATA"""" [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img] to Micro$oft........JG

                        The Garage
                        HS2PRO - Ocelot, SecuIR, Secu16, Attendence Management Alarm Interface, X-10, LCD Studio VFD Display, 3 Apexis IP Cams, Custom Software Interfaces, GMQ Geiger Graphing
                        HS3PRO - Testing

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          This is quite an old post, but could this be used to send UDP messages in HS3? What I'm trying to do is send the value of a device to my arduino that shows this value on a large display. I've setup the receiving side but need to send variable data from my Homeseer HS3 to the Arduino. Anyone any experience with this?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ABL View Post
                            This is quite an old post, but could this be used to send UDP messages in HS3? What I'm trying to do is send the value of a device to my arduino that shows this value on a large display. I've setup the receiving side but need to send variable data from my Homeseer HS3 to the Arduino. Anyone any experience with this?
                            That plugin is not going to even load in HS3, it's made for HS1.

                            There are loads of .net methods to use from a script - https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...code-snippet-2 is going to be a good start
                            My Plugins:

                            Pushover 3P | DoorBird 3P | Current Cost 3P | Velleman K8055 3P | LAMetric 3P | Garadget 3P | Hive 3P |
                            Yeelight 3P | Nanoleaf 3P

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                            • #15
                              I'm not a programmer by nature, hoped someone has a sample script in place... Thanks for the link, will try to figure out...

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