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    #46
    But Dan,

    I thought VNC only used port 5900 for outgoing. Isn't that what you wrote? How would I go about changing which port VNC uses for outgoing?

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      #47
      When you are talking about server applications, you are talking about the port it is listening to (outgoing is a totally different thing, and usually doesn't matter).

      If you want to move the VNC services to a different port, you would have to use the following steps:

      http://www.calwell.ca/articles/a0028.php

      Good luck!

      ---
      Do you cocoon?
      http://www.CocoonTech.com
      HSPRO 2.4 (ESXi 4.1) | my.Alert NEW | my.Trigger | HSTouch | ACRF2 | UltraM1G | BLWeather | BLLan | Rover
      (aka xplosiv)
      Do You Cocoon? Home Automation News, Tutorials, Reviews, Forums & Chat

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        #48
        Dan,

        I'm really confused. I don't know all the nuances of networking yet. Are you saying that I should be able to connect from work because the outgoing port doesn't matter? I think we have a sonic firewall here. It is a little blue box in the server room. I don't know if that makes a difference. If I cannot connect from work, and it is not the firewall, what could it be? Thanks.

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          #49
          ignore my previous rambling , did you try the instructions to change the port?

          ---
          Do you cocoon?
          http://www.CocoonTech.com
          HSPRO 2.4 (ESXi 4.1) | my.Alert NEW | my.Trigger | HSTouch | ACRF2 | UltraM1G | BLWeather | BLLan | Rover
          (aka xplosiv)
          Do You Cocoon? Home Automation News, Tutorials, Reviews, Forums & Chat

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            #50
            I'll have to wait until I get home, unless you mean change the port here at work. I could probably change the port here at work to 80, but won't I also have to change it to 80 at home? Like I said yesterday, I did a port scan, and everything was closed except for the 2 ports I mentioned.

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              #51
              You would have to change the listening port (where the VNC services runs, which is at home in your case), there is nothing you can (or should) change on your work computer.

              ---
              Do you cocoon?
              http://www.CocoonTech.com
              HSPRO 2.4 (ESXi 4.1) | my.Alert NEW | my.Trigger | HSTouch | ACRF2 | UltraM1G | BLWeather | BLLan | Rover
              (aka xplosiv)
              Do You Cocoon? Home Automation News, Tutorials, Reviews, Forums & Chat

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                #52
                Ok,

                But if my work pc has all ports blocked, how does this help? Please excuse me for seeming stupid, I just want to understand. I could change my port at home to 1,000,000,000 if that was allowed, and it would still be blocked at work.

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                  #53
                  Well you said you can access HS from work using a port in the 10000's, which is why we suggested to change it to an unusual port # as you did with your HS system.

                  <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
                  I am not clear. Are you saying that I should run homeseer on 5900 so that I can use VNC? I can access homeseer remotely on port 10023, which is what it is set to.
                  <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                  ---
                  Do you cocoon?
                  http://www.CocoonTech.com
                  HSPRO 2.4 (ESXi 4.1) | my.Alert NEW | my.Trigger | HSTouch | ACRF2 | UltraM1G | BLWeather | BLLan | Rover
                  (aka xplosiv)
                  Do You Cocoon? Home Automation News, Tutorials, Reviews, Forums & Chat

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                    #54
                    Beach, I would suggest you find a networking primer online and read it. You are going to be confused by whatever we tell you to do until you understand how networking connections are made. I'll try to explain it here with enough detail so the concepts will not be difficult to follow.

                    Suffice it to say that the IP address and port make up a unique address to a machine and the service running on the machine. Ports numbered froim 1-1024 are typically used for standard services, and are therefore called protected or well-known ports. Port 80 is used for HTTP, typically for web servers. The web server listens on port 80 for connection requests. No other sevrice can use port 80 if it is in use. Each interface usually has 65,535 ports available. So, in your example, you HS machine running a web server on port 80 would be something like: 192.168.1.110:80

                    VNC server (on the machine you wish to control) uses port 5900. Although this is above the 1024 mark, it is also a well-known port. 192.168.1.110:5900

                    Typically, any port can be used for any service, but assumptions have been made by the client program, such as your browser, that a certain port is in use for the web server - port 80. That's why you don't need to tack on the ":80" at the end of every URL. For HTTPS (SSL) where the connection is encrypted, for example, putting "https://www.iamaprotectedwebsite.com" tells your browser to connect to that machine (as translated to an IP address by DNS) at port 443. The machine must be running a web server with SSL encryption at port 443 or you cannot make the connect, unless you specify a different port on which the SSL-enabled web server is listening.

                    In normal networking, the server machine that you connect to will then also connect back to your machine on another port - an unused one higher than 1024. This makes the connection bi-directional so that information and control can travel in both directions.

                    For a clearer picture, open a DOS prompt on a machine you are using to surf the Internet. Type in the command:

                    netstat -na

                    and look at the results, which shows IP addresses and ports in use and to/from what machines.

                    In networking, source ports are the port you are using on your machine and destination ports are what you are trying to connect to on the remote machine. Destination ports are tpyically mapped to certain services, so port 80 on a web server is mapped to the web server application which uses HTTP protocol. Email uses SMTP protocol on port 25, typically.

                    However, most applications - either server or client, can usually be changed to use different ports. Even if you do use different ports that may be open through a firewall (allowed), their may be other restirctions such as protocol proxying, which means, for example, that you couldn't open a VNC connection using port 80 through the corporate firewall because they only allow HTTP and VNC at port 5900 isn't HTTP protocol.

                    I hope I haven't confused you even further, but if you can't understand this here or from a TCP/IP networking primer online, you should probably ask a local friend or IT staff member to come over and help configure your systems for you. It is not as simple as it initially sounds.

                    - Gordon

                    If we are what we eat, then I'm fast, easy, and cheap!
                    |
                    | - Gordon

                    "I'm a Man, but I can change, if I have to, I guess." - Man's Prayer, Possum Lodge, The Red Green Show
                    http://HiddenGemTech.com - http://MaineMusiciansExchange.org - http://www.WJZF.org

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                      #55
                      This is unbelievable! I am going nuts! At work, I cannot connect to my hs pc. Now, tonight I tried to connect to both my sister and my cousin with netmeeting and VNC, and I could not! But guess what, they could connect to me! How is that possible? I don't get it. What am I doing wrong? They both have aol dial up. I have my hs pc in the DMZ zone. All ports should be open. I am running zone alarm now, but I had it diasabled when I was trying to connect. I can connect to both pc's on my home network using internal ip's. I can't connect to anyone with my hs pc.

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                        #56
                        http://www.tightvnc.com...

                        It's a better version anyway. It allows you to set a listening port to anything.

                        So, I would set mine to listen to a port that is allowed thru your work firewall (try ftp).

                        Make sure there's no ftp server running on your machine. You can still transfer files using tightvnc, so you aren't losing anything by giving up the ftp port.

                        Using the tightvnc client from work, connect to 'foo.bar.baz::23' (2 colons)

                        82 X10 Devices and counting...

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                          #57
                          It appears the people I was trying to connect to where giving me ip addressed from what' my ip from inside an aol browswer. Well, that gives a false ip address! I had them run what's my ip from an ie browser, and guess what! It worked!

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