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Debugging my QSE100 Ethernet to serial adapter

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  • Bestgear
    replied
    Hi

    Sorry this has caused you so many hassles!

    Here are the pinouts for 9pin swap - scroll down the page, as there are a few there. http://www.mcamafia.de/mcapage0/diagwrap.htm Basically all you are doing is wrapping around rx and tx, then making the handshaking signals satisfy themselves.

    Does the quatech box see your client connect (ie open) the ports in the diagnostic page?

    WRT sniffers these can be confusing as some need two ports to work, and your PC is effectivley in the middle between the two devices.... so you would tell the app to use com1 for example and you connect the device to com2... with the sniffer in the middle...anyway - I would not go there as you will end up wasting time!

    I would get the above cable made and try the diags again... this really is not that difficult...

    David
    Last edited by Bestgear; January 26, 2010, 04:02 AM.

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  • Mr Spock
    replied
    Hi Guys, thanks for all the replies. I've never played with serial ports much so I'm not really up on their peculiarities.

    I had an old DB9 cable so I cut one up and ohm'd the pinout. Step 1 was a success.

    Next I looked up loopback pin configurations on the Internet and found there are several. WTF, very confusing. Not sure what to make of this, step 2 not so sucessful...

    Next I found a free serial port sniffer program called AccessPort. I tried to use it to sniff my COM3 currently used by my RFXcom dual band receiver. This software just generates error messages that the port is already in use. Again not so successful.

    So I've not really made any progress.

    To recoup where I'm at on this:
    1) Comms with the Quatech unit are good. I can access the server and configure it's settings.
    2) Windows recognizes it fine as shown below. I've set it for a static IP address.
    3) There seems to be a difference in the port settings that Windows shows and the server shows. Not sure if this is a real problem or not.
    4) At the time I took these screen shots nothing was hooked up to the serial ports.

    I suspect the box is OK and that I'm doing something wrong. I could do what Michael and Pete recommended, but at this point I've cut up all my DB9 serial port cables.
    Attached Files

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  • Bestgear
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Spock View Post
    However nothing seems to happen on the serial side. I tried my always working TI103 on it to no avail. No comms with my thermostat.

    What are some easy ways to check this unit and the serial data? Any good probing software? Can I toggle a serial pin and measure the voltage with my volt meter?

    Forgetting about any tests for now.... does the cable from the Quatech device to a regular PC work fine in your application?

    If not, then I would fix that first before looking elsewhere.

    On to the Quatech box itself - do you have the port set for "normal" and the rest of the settings at default?

    Do all the 4 ports act the same when you try them?

    I have three of these Quatech boxes in use now, and am 100% happy with them.


    David

    Leave a comment:


  • Pete
    replied
    I am not sure though what's easily available to Jeff therefore suggested the one PC two Hyperterminal sessions. Thinking he might have some serial cables around. A DB-9 RS-232 cable is not common these days but a USB to serial cable is.

    Almost all of my RS-232 connections today are using small DB-9/RJ-45 connectors. You can actually make a DB-9 loop tester for about $2 with one of these connectors. For my testing though will use a router/switch laying round.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bestgear
    replied
    Guys

    Being realistic, using hypererminal is a bit of a pain in this configuration.

    Just make a wrap plug and get a (free) comm test program.

    These tools usually let you run the test in a loop providing an extensive test over time.

    You will get fed up typing stuff into one hyperterminal window to watch it appear in another...


    David

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  • Pete
    replied
    You can do this with one computer. As Michael stated above.

    - install QSE application on a pc or laptop. Validate that the ports are seen in Control panel / system / hardware /device manager - write down the first virtual com port number.
    - Plug your computer/laptop to one of the configured serial ports on the QSE100.

    - Load up Hyperterm session 1 and connect it to 1st of the virtual ports on the PC. Make sure your com port matches.
    - Load up Hyperterm session 2 and configure it to a real com port on your PC or laptop.

    Whatever you type in the terminal window on session 1 should show up in the terminal window on session 2 and vice versa.

    Using attached picture of settings as an example you would set up COM1 to talk to virtual ethernet serial port COM8.

    Note: I noticed is that the QSE-100 has male DB-9 ports (as so does your PC) and typically an RS-232 cable is male to female or USB to RS-232 cable has a male DB-9 port.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Pete; January 18, 2010, 12:17 PM.

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  • Mr Spock
    replied
    I'll give a loopback plug a try. Thanks.

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  • Michael McSharry
    replied
    The wraparound is a good technique. I typically take hyperterm to drive an existing COM port and route the otuput of that port to the port I'm testing which is also connected to another hyperterm session. I may use rather than hyperterm as this gives me more debug capability. Pins 2 and 3 are swapped and pin 5 straight.

    You also need to be sensitive to the hardware comm protocols. If hardware handshaking is setup then you need the DTR/RTS/CTS/DSR pins correctly mated depending upon the protocol. It is best is you can configure for no hardware or software flow control during this testing as it only complicates it.

    With the Lantronix units there is also a telnet session that can be established to observe the traffic within the unit. That way if you do not have success with a total wraparound you can see if the failure is sending or receiving.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bestgear
    replied
    Hi

    Th easiest way to thoroughly check the serial ports is with a wrap plug and something like hyperterminal or one of the many com port test utilities.

    Look here:

    http://www.guywinters.com/tech/loopback.htm

    As for com port tester - B&B Electronics have a handy COM Test utility.


    Check each port with a wrap plug using the com test utility - it sends data to the port and reports back what came back from the port - ie, out through TX and in from RX and then back to your screen.... same in both windows... means the data made the trip without error.

    If you use hyperterminal, with a wrap plug, whatever you type should be echoed with the wrap inserted.

    The B&B utility lets you run it continiously which is handy to soak test the kit.

    Hope that helps.

    David
    David

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Spock
    started a topic Debugging my QSE100 Ethernet to serial adapter

    Debugging my QSE100 Ethernet to serial adapter

    Got one of these 4 serial port to Ethernet boxes on Ebay for $20 like so many of you on this site. I've set it up using the Quatech SW, installed drivers and everything looks fine. I can access it's internal server and even updated the firmware to version 4.26. When I send data to it's serial ports I see the red Data light on the front flash. Windows looks happy with it in Device Manager.

    However nothing seems to happen on the serial side. I tried my always working TI103 on it to no avail. No comms with my thermostat.

    What are some easy ways to check this unit and the serial data? Any good probing software? Can I toggle a serial pin and measure the voltage with my volt meter?
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