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  • IP address dilemma with wifi

    Hi guys, Iam having a problem with my HS server and several computers that communicate with my router. I have 2 laptops, 1 iPad and a Sonos speaker whitch is wireless. The problem Iam having is, in occasion an error show up in my HS server and my laptop saying, "ip address conflict " something like that, which causes some of my device not to connect to the internet. I have to sometime disconnect the router then reconnect it so the problem can go away, but when another pc or iPad try's to connect, it won't connect. Has anyone seem this problem?
    Hector
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  • #2
    Originally posted by Rotech View Post
    Hi guys, Iam having a problem with my HS server and several computers that communicate with my router. I have 2 laptops, 1 iPad and a Sonos speaker whitch is wireless. The problem Iam having is, in occasion an error show up in my HS server and my laptop saying, "ip address conflict " something like that, which causes some of my device not to connect to the internet. I have to sometime disconnect the router then reconnect it so the problem can go away, but when another pc or iPad try's to connect, it won't connect. Has anyone seem this problem?
    Your router is assigning the same IP to two machines. Try giving each computer a static address, that's how I solved the problem.

    And before you say a router cannot do that, believe me they can.
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    • #3
      This is caused due to allowing DHCP on your router allowing devices to automatically obtain an ipaddress while some of your device have static ipaddress. I see this when I shut down my weather server or HomeSeer server and one of my other devices that does not have a static ipaddress assigned is turned on. This allows the router to assign the ipaddress reserved by one of the devices being off to be assigned. Most routers have something like DHCP reservations that allow you to assign ipaddress to your devices to prevent this. Check out DHCP reservations in your router and see if you have something like this.
      -Rupp
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      • #4
        Yes as Rupp states; make adjustments to the scope of the DHCP addressing on the router. The scope is the range of IP's you want to use and the keep alive for renewing those IPs. I prefer too to utilize static IP addressing keeping literally only like 4 addresses available for DHCP; but thats me.
        - Pete

        Auto mator
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        • #5
          By default most routers just do a class C or 254 addresses for your subnet. Its a bit much. Here is an example of two extremes one being 1/2 the size of a class c subnet and another a bit smaller for maybe a typical home network. Historically I like to kept the HW devices low in the subnet, then static IPs in the middle and DHCP on the top of the IP mask.

          You can make it smaller like creating a subnet for your own stuff:

          1 - set your IP on your router to say 192.168.244.129 (gateway)
          with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.128 (mask bit of 25) and host address range of 192.168.244.130-192.168.244.254 giving you like 126 hosts (over kill though)
          Set up your DHCP scope to say just a few addresses from maybe 192.168.244.130 to 140 or so.

          2 - set your IP on your router to say 192.168.244.241 (gateway)
          with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.240 (mask bit of 28) and host address range of 192.168.244.242-192.168.244.254 giving you like 14 hosts (smaller though)
          Set up your DHCP scope to say just a few addresses from maybe 192.168.244.242 to 245 or so.

          I keep a DNS list of my statically assigned IP addresses which includes the IP, DNS name and my comments. I have stuff today in groups and leave room for the addition of more IPs. I still utilize common names for my DHCP stuff; more to see them appear on the network with a recognizable name than anything else.

          In addition if you have the means on your router / firewall; you can put your wireless devices in their own network using DHCP in a DMZ like configuration such that they talk to the regular network via the firewall and the internet. This involves more NIC interfaces on your firewall and bridging with rules between the NICs; you can utilize colors for the different networks; Red for Internet (like to your comcast modem), Green for your internal network (like where Homeseer sits) and blue for a separate wireless network. You can really mix and match and make it as simple or as complex as you want these days.
          Last edited by Pete; December 11th, 2011, 08:08 PM.
          - Pete

          Auto mator
          Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb- Mono 6.8X
          Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.8X
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          HS4 Lite -

          X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Smartthings hub, Hubitat Hub, and Home Assistant

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          • #6
            just use conflict resolution

            most dhcp servers will have some sort of conflict resolution or detection. if you see that, just turn it on and you should be done. basically it just sends a ping to the address before it hands it out, just set it to 2 or 3 attempts. If you have a statically assigned device and it is off, you do run the risk of the server giving away its ip.

            next easiest would be to just block out a section of your network to not send dhcp addresses. say your scope is 192.168.0.2-254, you can either shorten the scope to 192.168.100-200 (enough for 100 devices) or put in an exclusion list to the same effect. then any time you give a static address, you assign it from, say, 192-168.100.10-99. Dhcp will give out .100-200 and you can stop thinking about it. B)

            If you already have some static addresses in an address space you want to give to dhcp, you can add reservations, which is generally as simple as entering the mac address and the ip address you want to give it. most routers will show you all hte connected devices with their mac addresses and names.

            for a small home network, i wouldn't get into subnetting unless you know what you are a doing, it will just cause headaches.

            good luck

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