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Vlans and subnets - suggestions?

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  • Pete
    replied
    Here I have a software firewall on a box with multiple network cards.

    I am looking towards moving towards some internet pipe load balancing with same set up and different software.

    With physically autonomous networks on the inside though you can create rules sets for different networks inside while still having them talk to each other.

    I do not see getting much benefits from VLAN use at home.

    I have utilized QOS providing internet to the neighbors a few years ago. They were waiting for their broadband connectivity. Here I set up a wireless to wireless connection giving them a 128kps pipe using a DD-WRT wireless bridge. Worked fine.

    Gettting back to the OP and related bandwidth issues. Streaming video will utilize much bandwidth. Streaming on wireless really is a whole new set of rules and will typically consume a wireless pipe. That said QOS would most likely be detrimental to the wireless pipe.

    Ideally an autonomous wired network would work the best. Still though the bottleneck will be at your internet connection such that if you do much streaming directly from the internet to say one or two devices that will consume much of your pipe and will slow down any other stuff you are doing on the internet.

    The IP cameras would most likely utilize less bandwidth than the streaming devices on the network. If you are IP HD streaming though that will ding your bandwidth utilization especially if it was wireless. Best to actually check it with the free tools available on the internet for checking bandwidth utilization.
    Last edited by Pete; February 19th, 2013, 08:59 PM.

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  • travisdh
    replied
    Whilst not subnetting, I ended up connecting some DD-WRT routers to my main router, as switches / AP's (not using the router functionality). This allowed be to create one network (SecuNet) which i use for all of my security cameras, another for a wireless bridge (and other client devices that side of the house), and another on the other side of the house.

    I have a significant number of wireless devices (6 wireless cameras, two iphones, ipad, laptops, jogglers etc) and have not noticed any major issues.

    I have not had to play with QOS, but that said i have ethernet cables running to all of the AP's / Switches.

    The bonus to DD-WRT (or similar builds) is that you can create entirely isolated networks so that your guests can access the internet, but not your home network devices (if required).

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  • rmasonjr
    replied
    Originally posted by jlrichar View Post
    First off let me say that I am not an expert on this subject, and my understanding is peripheral.

    Here goes:

    QoS will require the network device to prioritize network traffic based on the type of traffic it is. If we are talking about internet bandwidth then the network device would be the gateway (the thing that does NAT). In your case I assume this is some type of WiFi router flashed with DD-WRT.

    If this is the case, then I would check to see if your DD-WRT hardware can actually handle QoS. What I am thinking is that even though DD-WRT gives you the ability to utilize QoS bandwidth prioritization, the hardware you are running it on is not powerful enough to keep up.
    ah - it could be. When I noticed that QoS crippled RDP and netflix, I quickly disabled it. I might have to play around with that again.

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  • jlrichar
    replied
    First off let me say that I am not an expert on this subject, and my understanding is peripheral.

    Here goes:

    QoS will require the network device to prioritize network traffic based on the type of traffic it is. If we are talking about internet bandwidth then the network device would be the gateway (the thing that does NAT). In your case I assume this is some type of WiFi router flashed with DD-WRT.

    If this is the case, then I would check to see if your DD-WRT hardware can actually handle QoS. What I am thinking is that even though DD-WRT gives you the ability to utilize QoS bandwidth prioritization, the hardware you are running it on is not powerful enough to keep up.

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  • rmasonjr
    replied
    Originally posted by jlrichar View Post
    Isn't QoS the salient tech that should be used to "solve" this problem?

    I believe you can use this to essentially limit how much bandwidth different types of network traffic are allowed to use on your network.
    I tried enabling QoS on a router with DD-WRT. My goal was to give RDP a higher priority than netflix (so I could VPN into my work computer while netflix streaming) but QoS made both RDP and netflix unusable.

    Anyone have any thoughts on QoS?

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  • jlrichar
    replied
    What about QoS?

    Isn't QoS the salient tech that should be used to "solve" this problem?

    I believe you can use this to essentially limit how much bandwidth different types of network traffic are allowed to use on your network.

    Leave a comment:


  • drozwood90
    replied
    just be careful that they are on different channels, and that the area around you is not saturated. In my house, I'd like to move to 5GHz, except that some hardware in my house does not support that.

    on the 2Ghz spectrum, I can pickup no less than 30 networks. of those, I would estimate that there are at least 15 that directly interfere with me (same channel, or are just on the wrong channels, so I can't move to something better). And when the neighbors are on, man, they are ON. My wifi speeds go from 1.2Mb/s to 100-200Kb/s.

    In the 5Ghz range, there is only one. "default". lol I guess they didn't know they left 5Ghz on.

    --Dan

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  • bpm32
    replied
    Yep, I just have one router.

    Based on the suggestions in this thread, I have added a second wireless access point that has really helped.

    I was thinking of adding a third wireless access point broadcasting a third SSID for just the cameras. All three wireless access points would be plugged into my one router.

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  • drozwood90
    replied
    unless he meant router being used as an access point.

    :-)

    --Dan

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  • tenholde
    replied
    I'd be careful about adding any additional routers. That would break your network into different sub-nets. Not all traffic, specifically broadcast packets (file and printer sharing, audio/video serving, etc) do not readily cross sub-net boundaries.

    Switches, on the other hand, pass nearly all traffic, maintaining tables of where on the network IP addresses reside and only send packets to the correct branch. This allows you to isolate high device-to-device traffic from the rest of your network.

    tenholde

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  • bpm32
    replied
    Thanks so much to everyone for your suggestions. I have added a second Airport Extreme broadcasting a different SSID. I've moved only the laptops and tablets to the first Airport and the remaining devices to the second Airport. We definitely notice a difference now internally, and somewhat to the outside world. Again, our Internet is slow, and not always so steady.

    I think I'll just bite the bullet and run the DSL line into the wiring closet. Been wanting to do that for some time - this will push me over the edge.

    Can one have too many WAPs? I was thinking of adding another strictly for the cameras, using one for "human" traffic, and the third for HS, TV, etc. (We don't have any Joeys at this point, but I can't rule that out in the future.)

    Any recommendations on good small switches? Again, I do have a few WAPs/routers that I had upgraded the firmware to DD-WRT, so maybe I can just use one of those instead of buying a switch.

    I feel like I need a degree in IT to straighten out what I'm doing here. lol

    Thanks again!

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  • tenholde
    replied
    It would seem from your description that the dish equipment (hopper/joey) would use a significantly larger bandwidth than anything else on your network.

    I have a similar setup using DirecTv equipment, and I isolate the TV traffic by placing all of my DirecTv equipment (3 DVRs, 5 total receivers) on the same switch by themselves. This allows them to send data to each other without affecting the rest of the network devices.

    I don't know if just placing the joey/hoppers on a different wireless access point is sufficient (don't know if there is an internal 'switch'). You might need to place a switch between your AP and your router.

    tenholde

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  • Uncle Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by bpm32 View Post
    My DSL modem/router supplied by CenturyLink does all my routing. I have the AirPort Extreme plugged into that for broadcasting.
    Does this mean that the modem and router functions are in the same box?

    In addition to adding a WAP (which I agree should go a long way to solve your immediate problem), if it is physically possible to run wire from the entry point of your DSL line to the wiring closet it would also be very helpful to get wired LAN there. Ideally, it could be Cat 5 from the modem to the router. But if they are combined, then either the telephone company may have to extend the DSL line, or you could run a line from the router to a switch in your closet. That would at least allow your LAN to operate off a fast switch, so data interchange on the LAN wouldn't all have to be wireless.

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  • reidfo
    replied
    Separating your network into VLANs won't solve your problem. VLANs logically separate the traffic, so it's still fighting for the same wireless router. You have a lot of wireless devices connected, and they're all contending for bandwidth. Your collision rate is probably pretty high, especially when you bring the cameras up.

    What I suggest is getting a second wireless access point and configuring it with a different SSID. Put the cameras on the WAP and I think you'll see your situation dramatically improve.

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  • bpm32
    replied
    Vlans and subnets - suggestions?

    Thanks so much for hanging with me.

    My DSL modem/router supplied by CenturyLink does all my routing. I have the AirPort Extreme plugged into that for broadcasting.

    My IP cameras are wireless. I am not using any other switches.

    We experience slowdown on both internal devices and the Internet. There are times that things run pretty well, but mostly we are slow.

    Unfortunately, the point where the Internet enters our house is not in the automation wiring closet, so I have to rely on wireless for everything. I would really like to get that line into the closet so at least my two servers are hard-wired and let the rest be wireless.


    Sent using Tapatalk HD

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