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Christmas Shopping for a new Intel Mini PC - 2014

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  • Christmas Shopping for a new Intel Mini PC - 2014

    Its been a couple of years now and recall a post here about shopping for a new PC around Christmas time.

    Personally I went and purchased two little Atom D525 Shuttle Netops for use with Homeseer 2 at the time. I also purchased 2 small footprint Atom D525 Foxconns at the time. I repurposed the Shuttle Netops as desktops / servers and they are still in use today being on 24/7. One is my wife's and the other is my Cumulus weather server.



    Foxconn Intel Atom D525's were redone. I put micro PSU power supplies in them and a stock CD / DVD ROM drive and dual SATA 2.5" drive cages in them. This was all documented right here on Homeseer.

    One modded Intel D525 Foxconn is still in use today for my HS2 box #1. I took the other Foxconn D525 Atom based motherboard into one automobile and replaced the motherboard in the Foxconn case with a BCM motherboard now serving as HS2 box #2. Note that this is a larger PC case. You could also add a 3.5" SATA drive under the full height CD/DVD ROM. You could also remove the full height CD/DVD ROM and turn that into a 4 drive SATA RAID cage providing you with 6 SATA RAID drives plus whatever you wanted for the 3.5" space occupied underneath the full height drive.



    Relating to the CarPC stuff went from this style case (too big)



    to this style case (which I also utilize for my test mITX Homeseer stuff). This would make an ideal mini itx case for Homeseer. Two SATA drives fit nicely in these and they are small cases for the DIY person. There are more mini itx low powered and reasonably priced motherboards than there are the new mini pc form factor boards. These boxes are exactly the same size as a mini itx board and about 2X / 3X height sized. I use these now for my DIN mounted carpc's.



    Media TV boxes went from this: (still like the looks - purchased a few of these). (PBO was part of this stuff).



    Today have three Ubuntu servers running in these small footprint boxes.

    Aopen boxes (tiny things).



    I haven't settled yet on the Homeseer 3 box and testing a variety of hardware running it. RPI, Intel, AMD, 32/64 bit Ubuntu 12.10....list goes on and on.

    Found an interesting article this morning on 12 Mini Intel powered PCs and will post it here. I haven't decided other than getting the most hardware options for my dollar and its Christmas time such that maybe there will be a good deal out there.

    Looking for a base here with HDMI, VGA, Audio analog / digital outputs, 8Gb of memory and a dual core CPU. (will just post). I am seeing Chrome Intel Netops now with 2Gb of memory for less than 100. I am leaning on an Intel / AMD powered PC versus an Arm powered PC for the base server running 64bit Linux. I like playing though with the ARM CPUs and will continue to do this. This endeavor though is relating to just one box running HS3 that I will leave alone (same as my HS2 boxes today).

    Best deals are bare bones with CPU (you provide OS, OS Media and memory). For HS3 you can purchase OEM W7 for less than $100. I personally am using a modded W8/8.1 that looks like W10 - today or Windows Server (overkill today). For HS3 will be using Ubuntu Server 12.10 (free). The Celeron / Chrome based boxes are most reasonable while the I3 are most expensive. That being said and personally I think the Lenova device is way over priced and last time I went to purchase something on their website it was totally a waste of my time. (but that is me). Rule of thumb for best deals are $100 for a Celeron based mini PC and maybe $150 for an I3 based mini Pc (that said this year noticing no real deals except for a few and much is 30% higher now than it was just a couple of months ago - not sure if anyone has paid attention).

    Unrelated but my favorite small footprint with a hard drive NMT is still the old Patriot Box Office NMT. They have a proprietary linux based embedded OS and I was able to chroot these to do a bit more. I personally liked the tiny size and what they could do at the time relating to video streaming et al. One of these running Ubuntu with VGA and Gb and a little celeron would be a great tiny little box. I purchased a few of these before going to the AOpen Digital engines for my XBMC stuff. (note that I utilizing XBMC OS (ubuntu) as a benchmark for a quick running PC with quick video - you don't need video at all to run HS3).



    12 Intel-powered mini PCs for $300 or less

    I will be adding a bit so it will be more than 12 mini PCs here.

    1. Intel NUC kit w/Core i3 Ivy Bridge

    Chip maker Intel kind of jump started the recent rush of tiny desktops a few years ago with the introduction of its NUC (Next Unit of Computing) platform. Several of the systems in this list are based on the NUC platform while others seem to be pretty clearly inspired by it.
    This model measures about 4″ x 4″ and features an Intel Core i3-3217U Ivy Bridge processor, integrated WiFi and Bluetooth, HDMI, and a few USB ports. Like many of systems on the list, the low price does not include memory or storage.


    2. Intel NUC kit w/Core i3 Haswell


    Need a bit more power? This is another small Intel NUC system, but it features a faster Intel Core i3-4010U Haswell processor, mini HDMI and DIsplayPort and Intel HD 4400 integrated graphics. The system supports up to 16GB of RAM and has an infrared sensor on the front for use with some remote controls.


    3. Gigabyte BRIX w/Celeron N2807


    Gigabyte offers a series of NUC-inspired mini-desktops as part of its BRIX line. This is the cheapest model so far, and the first to feature passive cooling for a fanless design. The BRIX GB-BXBT-2807 features an Intel Celeron N2807 dual-core Bay Trail processor which consumes just 4.3W of power, but which should be able to handle HD video playback and other basic tasks. It also supports external displays with resolutions up to 2560 x 1600 pixels and can handle dual-display configurations. This sysem has a single DDR3L 1333 memory slot, a 2.5 inch drive bay, HDMI and VGA output, Gigabit Ethernet, and 802.11n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0.


    4. Intel NUC kit with Celeron N2820


    This system’s a bit more powerful than the Gigabyte BRIX system listed above, but it also lacks passive cooling. The Intel NUC DN2820FYKH is powered by an Intel Celeron N2820 dual-core Bay Trail processor with a 4.5W TDP and it features 802.11b/g/n WiFi, Intel HD graphics, Gigabit Ethernet, a 2.5 inch drive bay, and support for DDR3L 1066 /1333 memory.


    5. ECS LIVA kit w/Bay Trail


    Elite Group Systems is a company that usually manufacturers goods for other PC makers, so most ECS-built products aren’t actually sold under the ECS name. But the ECS LIVA is an unusual little computer that’s designed for you to assemble yourself from a kit. Essentially that means you put the case together and arrange the antennae. This system features 2GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, an Intel Celeron N2807 dual-core Bay Trail processor, WiFi, Bluetooth, a few USB ports, and Gigabit Ethernet.


    6. Gigabyte BRIX w/Core i3


    Yup, it’s another Gigabyte system. This one features a Core i3-4010U Haswell processor and supports up to 16GB of DDR3 1333 / 1600 memory.
    It has an mSATA slot for storage and a half-sized mini PCIe slot which is occupied by a WiFi and Bluetooth card.


    7. Zotac ZBOX Nano ID63 w/Core i3 Ivy Bridge


    Like Gigabyte, Zotac is a company that’s probably best known for making graphics cards and other PC components. But Zotac has also been offering mini-desktops for the past few years. The system features an Intel Core i3-3227U dual-core Ivy Bridge processor, support for up to 8 GB of DDR3 1600 memory and has 2 mSATA ports, a SATA3 port, 4 USB 3.0 ports, 2 USB 2.0 ports, an eSATA port, HDMI and DisplayPort, S/PDIF, and a WiFi antenna connector as well as an Ethernet jack. While there’s no memory, storage, or operating system included, those specs make this one of the more versatile systems on the list.


    8. Zotac ZBOX-ID18-U w/Celeron Ivy Bridge


    Here’s another Zotac system with a nice array of ports, but this one features a less powerful Intel Celeron 1007U dual-core processor. It has room for a 2.5 inch SATA 3 hard drive or solid state drive, supports up to 16GB of DDR3 1600 RAM, and has 4 USB 2.0 ports, 2 USB 3.0 ports, HDMI and DVI ports, an eSATA port, Ethernet jack, S/PDIF audio, and mic and headphone jacks.


    9. Shuttle DS437T w/Celeron Ivy Bridge


    Shuttle has been building small form-factor PCs longer than just about any other company on this list, as well as PC cases for people who want to build their own tiny desktops. This system is one of the company’s more affordable models. It features a Celeron 1037U dual-core processor, a 2.5 inch drive bay and SATA 3 port, a half-sized mini PCIe port for the 802.11n WiFi card, and a nice range of ports includeing 4 USB 3.0 ports, 4 USB 2.0 ports, DVI and HDMI, Gigabit Ethernet, mic and audio jacks, and an SD card reader. There are 2 memory slots for up to 16GB of DDR3 1333 memory.
    The Shuttle DS437T measures 7.5″ x 6.5″ x 1.7″.


    10. Asus Chromebox-M004U w/Celeron 2955U + Chrome OS


    The Asus Chromebox might look like an NUC or BRIX kit. But it’s a full-fledged computer that comes with memory, storage, and an operating system pre-loaded. If you don’t like Google’s Chrome OS you can always install Ubuntu or another GNU/Linux distribution. This system features an Intel Celeron 2955U dual-core Haswell processor, 2GB of RAM, and 16GB of solid state storage, 802.11a/b/g/n WiFi, and Bluetooth 4.0. If you don’t need a lot of storage (or Windows), this might be one of the best bargains available.


    11. Lenovo Q190 w/Intel Celeron Ivy Bridge + Windows


    Lenovo is one of the few major PC makers to offer cheap mini-desktops that look nothing like an Intel NUC. The company’s Q190 desktops look more like a Nintendo Wii, if anything. The latest entry-level models feature a choice of Intel Celeron 1017U dual-core Ivy Bridge processor, up to 4GB of RAM, a 500GB hard drive, and Windows 8.1 software. There are also models with up to 1TB of storage, and up to an Intel Core i3 CPU, but those systems cost a bit more.


    12. Asus VivoPC w/Celeron Ivy Bridge + Windows 8


    At first glance the Asus VivoPC looks like an optical disc drive rather than a computer. But this is a little PC with a Celeron 1007U dual-core processor, 4GB of RAM (and support for up to 16GB), a 500GB hard drive, and Windows 8 software. It has 2 USB 3.0 ports, 4 USB 2.0 ports, 802.11ac WiFi, and Gigabit Ethernet. While it’s not the most powerful PC on this list, like the Lenovo Q190 this is a fully-functional PC with memory, storage, and Windows software for under $290. At 7.5″ x 7.5″ x 2.2″ this system is a little larger than some of the other computers in this list, but unlike many of the other systems, the VivoPC has room for a 3.5 inch hard drive.

    13. EMC-600S Super-slim Mini ITX Aluminum HTPC/NAS/Server PC Case with 12V DC Power Supply for the DIYer.

    You can put in any low powered / any CPU mini ITX board in this box and it looks nicer than the one above (IE: here keep HS servers on a rack in the basement and never look at them nor use the GUI much these days).



    14. Commodore Amiga Mini PC (2012) - with I7 and low powered.

    For those reminiscing about the Amiga and like the look of a mini pc.



    15. Xi3 - tiny modular computer - personally never saw this one.

    Quad-core AMD Trinity Series processor up to 3.2GHz
    Radeon HD 7660G GPU with 384 programmable cores
    8GB of DDR3 RAM
    64GB–1TB mSATA SSD
    2 – Mini–DisplayPorts
    1 – HDMI/DisplayPort combo
    4 – eSATAp–III ports (Also supports USB 2.0)
    4 – USB 3.0 ports (Also supports USB 2.0)
    4 – USB 2.0 ports (12 Ports total including above)
    1 – 1Gb Ethernet Port
    Power: 30 Watts
    External size: 4.270x3.656x3.656–inches
    3–year Warranty



    Last edited by Pete; December 6th, 2014, 11:55 AM.
    - Pete

    Auto mator
    Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb- Mono 6.8X
    Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.8X
    HS4 Pro - V4.0.7.0 - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Kaby Lake CPU - 32Gb - Mono 6.8X
    HS4 Lite -

    X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Smartthings hub, Hubitat Hub, and Home Assistant

  • #2
    Nice post Pete. I had just myself been browsing all of these during the past week. The market has really exploded. Here HS runs virtuallized on a Supermicro based server, but I did pick up an i5 NUC to serve as a media PC and Plex client. After having tried Roku, Android devices, and our Samsung smart TV apps, I was still dissatisfied with performance when it comes to very bitrate heavy content in our home theater. With the size of these devices now, I did not mind to go back to a home theater PC. An i3 would have sufficed, but I like a little extra horsepower.

    I have been looking for a good Chromebox deal to wipe and then play with Openelec on, but haven't gotten it yet.

    Comment


    • #3
      Side rant....

      Yup a wired versus wireless quad core ARM with a very fast GPU is best for this stuff. Single function OS; pure meat works the best.

      Well I also shut off my XBMC boxes and do not prefer an always on smart tv thing. That is me though.

      The little sticks are OK but are all wireless.

      But geez what a great idea to connect an Android based OS to your television resembling your always connected telephone.

      Imagine the metrics being built in the cloud right now relating to what people watch on their new LCD TVs these days.

      Not sure if Nielsen has been able to keep up with the technology as its totally different than what they are used to.


      Back to the OP stuff....

      This OP which only relates to a base box for Homeseer 3 which ideally runs Wintel or Linux or even MAC for a primarly do all Homeseer 3 server with a good base of CPU processing, plenty of memory and options relating to that whole analog to digital connectivity of stuff.
      Last edited by Pete; December 6th, 2014, 10:48 AM.
      - Pete

      Auto mator
      Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb- Mono 6.8X
      Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.8X
      HS4 Pro - V4.0.7.0 - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Kaby Lake CPU - 32Gb - Mono 6.8X
      HS4 Lite -

      X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Smartthings hub, Hubitat Hub, and Home Assistant

      Comment


      • #4
        Is there any reason for a standalone HS3 device rather than run HS3 concurrently on a file server and avoid device clutter? There doesn't seem to be much support from HST for non-standard hardware, aside from the Zee that is.

        Comment


        • #5
          Is there any reason for a standalone HS3 device rather than run HS3 concurrently on a file server and avoid device clutter?
          No. VM's work fine. My current HS2 builds of Wintel server are based at less than 10Gb's. My XP touchscreens are running at around 3Gb with TTS. I personally wouldn't run a CCTV server, MythTV box (with 6 Tuners), NAS and Homeseer on one box. But that is me. Homeseer while its one piece of software does multitask with many pieces of hardware today (well mine does).

          Thinking most Wintel folks are used to one box / one gui on one piece of hardware. Well its similiar with other OS's or only a knowledge base or familiarity with one OS. They do and make hardware decisions based on what OS runs on the hardware or OS decisions based on what hardware it will run on. They also make software decisions based on what OS it runs on.

          Homeseer 3 runs just fine on a headless Ubuntu 64 bit box with an Intel or ARM CPU. I think there is support from HST relating to the ARM CPU RPi. With a 700Mhz CPU you cannot push it like a multicore Intel / AMD with 1,2,4,8 or 16Gb of internal memory.

          That said something like a 700Mhz RPi is a bit light. I did run Homeseer with TTS a while ago on an overclocked 400Mhz AMD single core processor many years ago with no issues on XP; it did only have a few analog to digital devices plugged in and not really hundreds of events, variables, plugins, scripts running.
          Last edited by Pete; December 6th, 2014, 04:46 PM.
          - Pete

          Auto mator
          Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb- Mono 6.8X
          Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.8X
          HS4 Pro - V4.0.7.0 - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Kaby Lake CPU - 32Gb - Mono 6.8X
          HS4 Lite -

          X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Smartthings hub, Hubitat Hub, and Home Assistant

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by NeverDie View Post
            Is there any reason for a standalone HS3 device rather than run HS3 concurrently on a file server and avoid device clutter?
            I had it all on one server once but my playing with new stuff on HS took my mail server down too often.

            Now they are on separate NUCs.

            I considered running things virtually. But I thought the cost was too high. I couldn't find a decent virtual server running at 30-40W. That might have changed now. :-)

            Regards
            Morten

            Comment


            • #7
              Looking at a wide price range here this afternoon. I am seeing though it appears that prices have gone up and you are actually getting less than just 2 years ago. I don't understand this. The first little footprint celerons were available (if you looked) for less than $100 with 2Gb of memory and wireless. That said some were posted on Ebay for $250.

              Ideally though a mini PC that you could use either a celeron or I3, I5 or I7 and have up to 16 Gb of memory and run at 20 watts would be nice for say $150.

              I do like that tack on the wall look or in a can look.
              Attached Files
              - Pete

              Auto mator
              Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb- Mono 6.8X
              Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.8X
              HS4 Pro - V4.0.7.0 - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Kaby Lake CPU - 32Gb - Mono 6.8X
              HS4 Lite -

              X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Smartthings hub, Hubitat Hub, and Home Assistant

              Comment


              • #8
                Michael McSharry's posting from last night is worth reading, if you haven't already, where he says:

                "In past years operation in the field of mcsSprinklers it was learned that the flash memory does not hold up past about a year of periodic write commands. This resulted in a design change where the flash was not used for periodic updates, but data was written to a second memory device which was a USB SSD. These provisions do not exist with HS3 and I would be concerned with the long term integrity of HS3 on embedded Linux. "(http://board.homeseer.com/showthread.php?t=171523)

                I don't know if he's right or wrong, but it does give me pause.

                Over the last week I also started looking at the next step up, such as you have done with your list here, but it can be a slippery slope. In particular, as cost goes up, I find it becomes harder for me to justify a separate standalone solution. Maybe that's just me though. On the other hand, finding a solution that's immune to a single point of failure, possibly through redundant inexpensive computers in a clever configuration, would be easier to justify.
                Last edited by NeverDie; December 7th, 2014, 10:59 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I would hope that hst went through some sort of stress tests with hs3 when the zee was released.

                  Sent from my SCH-R970X using Tapatalk
                  HS3Pro Running on a Raspberry Pi3
                  68 Z-Wave Nodes, 174 Events, 326 Devices
                  UPB modules via OMNI plugin/panel
                  Plugins: Z-Wave, OMNI, HSTouch, weatherXML, EasyTrigger
                  HSTouch Clients: 3 Android, 1 Joggler

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The reason I bring it up at all on this thread (i.e. why it's topical rather than a tangent) is that I was looking at this particular Intel NUC PC (~$129), which on the surface sounds like an Intel'ified copy of the Raspberry Pi design concept:


                    http://www.amazon.com/Intel-DE3815TY...ds=DE3815TYKHE

                    In the description it says: " Fanless Thermal Solution For The Ultimate Silence And Reliability, Onboard Flash Storage For Small-footprint Software Solutions, Internal Flat Panel Display Connectivity For Built-in Screens, Video Graphics Array (vga) Port For Monitor Compatibility In Legacy Installations, Serial Ports Header For Peripherals Requiring The Robustness Of Hardware Handshaking, Watchdog Timer For Resilient System Availability, And Also Inter-integrated Circuit (i2c) And Pulse Width Modulation (pwm) Signals For Interfacing With Sensors And Other Embedded Devices Enabling The Internet Of Things."

                    I'm not familiar with NUC's. Would HS3 have the same weakness on it that Michael Sherry is warning about above? Or would the onboard Flash be just read-only for boot-up purposes?

                    Regardless, the built-in Watchdog Timer sounds like a nice-to-have for a minimalist device.
                    Last edited by NeverDie; December 7th, 2014, 10:45 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yup; here tested and currently using mcsSprinklers / Mono on a Seagate Dockstar over the last couple (more?) of years being on 24/7. Michael asked me to test the mono mcsSprinklers running on arm based Linux many years ago now and I did and it is still running today.

                      First run messed up the USB sticks within a few months. I initially switched over to a CF drive which worked I then switched over to a combination of an USB SSD and a USB to PATA ZIF SSD. This is working perfectly.

                      I had earlier mentioned the whole USB SSD thing to Michael as I was using these for my testing of the Joggler stuff initially with RW's being way faster than a regular SSD.

                      The above noted I also suggested the use of the USB SSD to a Homeseer user in the EU whom I had provided a customized XP boot and that it worked way better than a regular USB stick. That said he had some difficulties finding the USB SSD stick. They are still out there. The SSD stick is much larger though than a regular USB stick. I removed it from the shell before using it cuz it wouldn't fit inside of the Joggler. Going to a PATA ZIF SSD though was much nicer.

                      I do think that the MMC that is soldered on might have more RW's in it than a removable one. That is a guess.

                      Years ago tested the conversion of United Airline airport terminals to embedded XPE or Linux. The worry was how many RW's. XPE though became fatter than the Linux embedded. None the less the repair and speed of repair was much faster and cheaper on an embedded terminal than a regular wintel terminal.
                      - Pete

                      Auto mator
                      Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb- Mono 6.8X
                      Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.8X
                      HS4 Pro - V4.0.7.0 - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Kaby Lake CPU - 32Gb - Mono 6.8X
                      HS4 Lite -

                      X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Smartthings hub, Hubitat Hub, and Home Assistant

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by NeverDie View Post
                        Michael McSharry's posting from last night is worth reading, if you haven't already, where he says:

                        "In past years operation in the field of mcsSprinklers it was learned that the flash memory does not hold up past about a year of periodic write commands. This resulted in a design change where the flash was not used for periodic updates, but data was written to a second memory device which was a USB SSD. These provisions do not exist with HS3 and I would be concerned with the long term integrity of HS3 on embedded Linux. "(http://board.homeseer.com/showthread.php?t=171523)

                        I don't know if he's right or wrong, but it does give me pause.

                        Over the last week I also started looking at the next step up, such as you have done with your list here, but it can be a slippery slope. In particular, as cost goes up, I find it becomes harder for me to justify a separate standalone solution. Maybe that's just me though. On the other hand, finding a solution that's immune to a single point of failure, possibly through redundant inexpensive computers in a clever configuration, would be easier to justify.
                        Considering HomeTrollers had flash drives also (apart from some of the early ones?) I don't think HS is new to being run on this sort of memory. I've seen a few posts where it did appear that the memory died but only HST probably know the reliability data. It always concerned me that regardless of whether or not HS was optimised to run on min read/writes there was and is no guidance whatsoever on plugin writers doing the same. It could be that a plugin is truly hammering the file system with some calls that could lead to premature failure of a flash drive.
                        My Plugins:

                        Pushover 3P | DoorBird 3P | Current Cost 3P | Velleman K8055 3P | LAMetric 3P | Garadget 3P | Hive 3P |
                        Yeelight 3P | Nanoleaf 3P

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          BTW here my Zee / RPi did scramble the 16Gb SD card I was using after some time. It did not ruin it though cuz I reformatted it and rewrote the image to it. That said years early played with the Chumby main OS SD card using the base that came with the Chumby and chrooting it to a CF card. These went for over a year before I shut them down and did fine. I never scrambled the mini SD card in the Chumby nor the CF card.

                          I have tested a few Jogglers over the years. These were built to be on 24/7 connected to the cloud. The boot EFI 1Mb chip was removable / replacable. I have messed them up writing and rewriting them. Never ruined them though. The OS 1Gb MMC is soldered on and I have also scrambled this MMC but never ruined it. One out of XX only to date.

                          Another BTW - noticed the newest Joggler Android boot OS from a stick only provides about 3 reboots. Well same with the Windows 8.0 boot stick for the Joggler. Writing the Android OS to an SSD PATA drive didn't fix the boot issue but it did fix the boot up issue with Windows 8.0. Relating to the Ubuntu Linux booting stuff on the Joggler I have had no issues what so ever. Its just way slow from a USB stick versus a PATA SSD drive.

                          Well and the first in wall Android touchscreen offered here I did mess up the OS rewriting / writing a new one and having to keep reformatting the MMC in it (never took it apart to know if it was soldered in or just an SD card). It boots up fine today with a totally modded and redone Android OS. But it really is too slow for practical use. But that is me. Most of these devices (android) have static OS's not made to modify / RW anyways.

                          Well too I have only played with smaller SSD drives (USB or ZIF). I have lost one of each over the last 3 years. The USB SSD stick burned up (literally) and the ZIF SSD just quit.

                          Relating to Homeseer 2 I created a mini less than 10 Gb Windows Server partition on an old fashioned new but cheap 160Gb SATA drive (well then used two in a mirror). Current the two Homeseer two boxes are running in this fashion with a hot swap 2 SATA drive cage in the 3.5" compartment of the two boxes. It is a waste of a 160Gb drive but very easy to back up the partition. Same for my Homeseer XP Joggler touchscreens running on less than 4gb with TTS and a bunch of stuff on a 16Gb SSD drive.

                          The methodology of having two drives that Michael came up with and using SSD appears to be optimal mostly cuz its worked for me with the mono mcsSprinklers program always running 24/7 now for the last couple of years. Really too the Seagate Dockstar footprint is tiny and the CPU speed is faster than the RPi. Well now see little SSD SATA port DOM chips which would work fine probably?

                          Personally I purchased the Homeseer Zee because it was the first version of Homeseer to run in Linux. I purchased it for the Homeseer 3 software rather than the hardware. That said I did move it to other Linux things in the house (arm and intel and amd) and it worked perfectly. I give credit to Homeseer to run their software on an RPi. Its never been done before and it was a major milestone for the RPi folks / Homeseer folks. Before this I think there were many folks tinkering with all sorts of stuff on the RPi as it is reasonably priced and the ideal little automation experimenting box. I wouldn't currently depend on the little hobby device for dependent automation / security stuff over the long term until it is more resilient over the long term. But that is me.

                          One of my OPII panels is over 10 years old and on 24/7 365 days a year and its firmware / RW stuff is soldered on to the main board and hasn't failed to date.

                          The $129 NUC mentioned above would work. It is a single core Atom (and may only do 32bit OS). Here relating to the CarPC went from Via 500Mhz to Via single core 1Gz CPUs to Intel Atom single core CPUs to Intel Atom dual core CPUs. Today I can stream live HD broadcasts TV on my carpc just fine. I couldn't do this though with the single core Atom nor earlier Via CPUs. But video and GPU is one thing versus base kernel CPU and I am comparing apples and oranges cuz you do not need video for the Homeseer 3 software. Best testing is proof of the pudding; purchasing it and installing Homeseer 3 on it. I just mentioned yesterday to another Homeseer user that whatever he gets or is convinced to get I will get too. That said user will be installing 64bit Wintel and I will be installing 64bit Linux on the computer. I have done this purchasing computers for family. IE: purchased a computer for my sister in law and purchased the same one for me. I take care of both of them today although the computer is not on my home office desk.

                          The mention of the posts from a couple of years ago did start mostly with the dual core Atom D525 by one Homeseer plugin writer / user net top boxes originally from Shuttle then Foxconn and bunch of folks purchasing them and installing Wintel 32 bit or 64 bit desktop or server OS's on them. The testing was live and the issues or non issues were posted. I purchased a second and third Foxconn computer. One I modified (with the the pico PSU et al and shipped it to a UK Homeseer user whom is using it today). Initially the second Foxconn was the Homeseer 2 #2 box. Then I took out the Foxconn D525 motherboad and put it in my automobile replacing the single core Atom running there. I liked the Foxconn case so much that I just replaced the motherboard in it with a BCM motherboard (which is still running today). Personally here my issue with using wintel 64bit server OS on the Foxconn was migrating my 32 bit voice fonts and having to tweak the OS to run my stuff (really not worth the effort for me).

                          Personally sort of looking at / wanting the Homeseer 3 on Linux like the XBMC folks in writing an XBMC dedicated OS with no real options to run much else. IE: XBMC running on Android or MAC or Wintel does compete with the rest of the OS base stuff running. I have been playing with this by initially creating a base server Linux OS and only configuring Homeseer 3 on it and an easy means of updating it; nothing else. (no NAS, no CCTV, no TV DVR, GUI nada as it already does a bunch of stuff)
                          Last edited by Pete; December 7th, 2014, 01:35 PM.
                          - Pete

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                          Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb- Mono 6.8X
                          Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.8X
                          HS4 Pro - V4.0.7.0 - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Kaby Lake CPU - 32Gb - Mono 6.8X
                          HS4 Lite -

                          X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Smartthings hub, Hubitat Hub, and Home Assistant

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                          • #14
                            Used laptops may be a good way to go you can get a quad core i7 for a few hundred and have the bonus of built in battery backup. I've been testing hs3 on a dual core netbook running win 7 and it's been working like a champ. Even have the kinect plugin going.

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                            • #15
                              Yup; for many years ran my Cumulus weather station software on an old IBM Thinkpad (well last model made by IBM) and stuck the computer in the wiring closet shelf folded in Florida. It ran fine 24/7 365 days a year. I was able to access it remotely and did upgrade it a few times over the years. Hard drive though did just recently fail on it (well after 3 years?). I knew it was going such that I backed up set up to the "new" Cumulus server running on the D525 Shuttle from the purchase mentioned above. That computer has also run 24/7 365 days. (have two of these).
                              - Pete

                              Auto mator
                              Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb- Mono 6.8X
                              Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.8X
                              HS4 Pro - V4.0.7.0 - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Kaby Lake CPU - 32Gb - Mono 6.8X
                              HS4 Lite -

                              X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Smartthings hub, Hubitat Hub, and Home Assistant

                              Comment

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