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My new paperweight

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  • My new paperweight

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  • #2
    Very cool, what's it from originally?

    If anyone's wondering, this should help explain:

    https://youtu.be/dI-JW2UIAG0

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    • #3
      Click image for larger version

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ID:	1327521 IBM 2361 "Large Capacity" Storage Unit (2MB)

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      • #4
        So my question is, how many bits you have in your "new" paperweight? I only ask because my eyes go crossed too soon to try to count them

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Meapilot View Post
          So my question is, how many bits you have in your "new" paperweight? I only ask because my eyes go crossed too soon to try to count them
          512 bytes (4096 bits)

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          • #6
            Awesome ! ~~ I guess that was my poor attempt to a pun ~~. It is very cool. I am close to the Space and Rocket Center that Fellhahn referenced for the Saturn V.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Meapilot View Post
              Awesome ! ~~ I guess that was my poor attempt to a pun ~~. It is very cool. I am close to the Space and Rocket Center that Fellhahn referenced for the Saturn V.
              "The IBM 2361, built by IBM's Poughkeepsie, N.Y. manufacturing facilities, was installed at NASA's Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) in Houston, Texas to process vast quantities of information used by MSC-based flight controllers for Gemini and Apollo missions. These units had 16 times the capacity of any previous IBM memory. In each 2361, almost 2 million ferrite cores were strung in two-wire cabinets and packaged, with associated circuitry, into a cabinet only 5 by 2 1/2 ft and less than 6 ft tall. The first memory was installed for use in the complex of five powerful IBM 7094 Model II data processing systems. Four additional memories were added to the NASA Real Time Computer COmplex (RTCC)"

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              • #8
                I do find that very interesting myself. Its interesting to me that this was so "innovative" at the time. And now to think of the "power" that fits in the palm of an individual hand or an even smaller footprint. How did you manage to acquire it? ~~ or is that still classified intel

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                • #9
                  That is awesome.

                  Had some paper weight and art objects from old tech myself as well that I had to leave behind when emigrating to USA. IBM magnetic harddisk platter that was one platter from 5 in total from 20MB harddisk the size of a vinyl record (used a few as Frisbees as well). An old rotary disc mechanism from a phone distribution center, punch-cards used to program government systems, and a few other items, so looking at this makes me want those back again

                  The NASA Glenn Research Center is here in Cleveland, and have it on my list to visit, so wondering if they had any of these type of machines as well.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Fellhahn View Post
                    Very cool, what's it from originally?

                    If anyone's wondering, this should help explain:

                    https://youtu.be/dI-JW2UIAG0
                    This brings back memories. While the fellow in the video was interpreting telemetry data from the Saturn-5, I was working in the McDonnell Douglas group that did all of the telemetry data acquisition and data reduction for the S-4B stage, which was mounted directly above the S-5 stage.

                    The digital computer we used for all our telemetry processing in those days was a Control Data model 924. Its main memory contained those same ferrite core doughnuts. The original machine contained 16K 24-bit words = 48K bytes. In 1967 we paid Control Data a cool million dollars (that's 1967 dollars!) to double the memory to 32K words. It took them about a week to complete the on-site conversion.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Meapilot View Post
                      I do find that very interesting myself. Its interesting to me that this was so "innovative" at the time. And now to think of the "power" that fits in the palm of an individual hand or an even smaller footprint. How did you manage to acquire it? ~~ or is that still classified intel
                      Where else, Ebay
                      https://www.ebay.com/itm/173964803008

                      Z

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RoChess View Post
                        That is awesome.

                        Had some paper weight and art objects from old tech myself as well that I had to leave behind when emigrating to USA. IBM magnetic harddisk platter that was one platter from 5 in total from 20MB harddisk the size of a vinyl record (used a few as Frisbees as well). An old rotary disc mechanism from a phone distribution center, punch-cards used to program government systems, and a few other items, so looking at this makes me want those back again

                        The NASA Glenn Research Center is here in Cleveland, and have it on my list to visit, so wondering if they had any of these type of machines as well.
                        There's a lot of old tech out there still, just Google or Ebay around you should be able to find some. When I worked for the railroad, they still had the old phone stepper switches... They were a pain to maintain.

                        Z

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ericg View Post

                          This brings back memories. While the fellow in the video was interpreting telemetry data from the Saturn-5, I was working in the McDonnell Douglas group that did all of the telemetry data acquisition and data reduction for the S-4B stage, which was mounted directly above the S-5 stage.

                          The digital computer we used for all our telemetry processing in those days was a Control Data model 924. Its main memory contained those same ferrite core doughnuts. The original machine contained 16K 24-bit words = 48K bytes. In 1967 we paid Control Data a cool million dollars (that's 1967 dollars!) to double the memory to 32K words. It took them about a week to complete the on-site conversion.
                          Very cool. How was the data distributed afterwards? Any used for real time or printed reports to individual departments?

                          That was a bit before my time. I worked mostly with DEC PDP and VAX systems (Pipeline SCADA control)

                          Z

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by vasrc View Post
                            When I worked for the railroad, they still had the old phone stepper switches... They were a pain to maintain.
                            Worked for Royal Dutch Phone company in the early 90ties, and was part of the AT&T/Philips ESS-5 group, which replaced all those old Dutch mechanical stepper switches for the electronic version, and from one of the centrals I helped convert I got one of the stepper switches, looked like:
                            Click image for larger version

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                            Had some interesting talk with those maintaining them, and a lot of curse words were part of that conversation indeed.

                            And to think that only took care of a single digit.

                            They used bikes to ride through the building section that contained all those switches for a "city", whereas it was all replaced by a few ESS-5 racks.

                            Buying one from eBay is not the same to me as having the one I tore out myself, but it was nice to be reminded on them by your post on history.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by vasrc View Post
                              True!! Wasnt sure if you had worked on them maybe!

                              Thats neat and interesting to hear the stories of how it was used and what was done with the data.


                              In in relative terms. Hasn't actually been that long ago!
                              I wasnt even a twinkle in someone's eye at that time.

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