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Corning Donates $1.8M In Parts For Space Telescope

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  • Corning Donates $1.8M In Parts For Space Telescope

    Wed, 07/30/2014 - 9:34am

    Michael Hill, Associated Press

    ALBANY, New York (AP) -- Corning Inc. has donated $1.8 million in high-tech components for a telescope a private group wants to launch into space.

    The not-for-profit BoldlyGo Institute wants to put its ASTRO-1 telescope in orbit by the mid-2020s. Obtaining the components for a roughly 6-foot (1.8-meter) telescope primary mirror will significantly contribute to the ambitious goal, the group said Tuesday in announcing the donation.

    The institute is beginning to raise cash and material for the project, which its CEO, Jon Morse, hopes will cost "well under" $1 billion.
    "This is a huge step forward that allows us to hit the ground running as we raise additional resources," said Morse, a former director of astrophysics at NASA Headquarters.

    The institute was formed last fall to increase the number and variety of space science mission through private funding. The ASTRO-1 space telescope would be used to study planets orbiting nearby stars, as well as the Milky Way and other galaxies. Morse said the telescope would have 10 times the field of view of the Hubble Space Telescope and could be used for exploration years from now when Hubble stops working well.

    The group, whose board includes members with links to NASA, also wants to fund an unmanned trip to Mars.

    "We all recognize, having worked in NASA, that there are not enough resources to pursue all the great ideas that are out there, so we're hoping to help build out the portfolio through private funding," Morse said.

    The components donated by the Corning, New York-based specialty glass maker had been intended for a NASA program that was canceled. Corning declined to specify the project, citing customer confidentiality.

    Corning has produced window glass for NASA's manned spacecraft missions and the International Space Station. It also produced the Hubble Space Telescope's primary mirror.

    Company officials said the donation is part of Corning's continued support of space exploration.

    "The work of the BoldlyGo Institute and the ASTRO-1 space telescope will continue this critical research for another generation, and we are proud to support it," Curt Weinstein, a Corning vice president and general manager, said in a statement.

    http://www.mbtmag.com/news/2014/07/c...pace-telescope

    On October 25, 2011 Corning unveiled Lotus Glass, an environmentally friendly and high-performance glass developed for OLED and LCD displays.

    Corning invests about 10% of revenue in research and development, and has allocated US$300 million towards further expansion of its Sullivan Park research facility near headquarters in Corning, New York.

    Corning Incorporated also manufactures a high-purity fused silica employed in microlithography systems, a low expansion glass utilized in the construction of reflective mirror blanks, windows for U.S. space shuttles, and Steuben art glass. The number of Corning facilities still employing the traditional tanks of molten glass has declined over the years, but it maintains the capacity to supply bulk or finished glass of many types.

    Corning is engaged in research and development on green lasers, mercury abatement, microreactors, photovoltaics, and silicon on glass.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corning_Inc.
    Last edited by Pete; July 31st, 2014, 08:42 AM.
    - Pete

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  • #2
    I toured the Corning factory back when I was a teenager. Pretty cool stuff. Gorilla glass is their mainstay product these days. My sister in law has worked there for some years.

    here's a blurb about their work with telescopes:
    http://www.corning.com/lifesciences/...elescopes.aspx
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    • #3
      Yup; I am in awe relating to the advances in touch screen technology Mark.

      In the 1980's played a bit with the touch screen stuff and at the time settled on the "light pen" for a CRT screen.



      Photo of the Hypertext Editing System (HES) console in use at Brown University, circa October 1969. The photo shows HES on an IBM 2250 Mod 4 display station, including lightpen and programmed function keyboard, channel coupled to Brown's IBM 360 mainframe.

      A light pen is a computer input device in the form of a light-sensitive wand used in conjunction with a computer's CRT display.

      It allows the user to point to displayed objects or draw on the screen in a similar way to a touchscreen but with greater positional accuracy. It was long thought[according to whom?] that a light pen can work with any CRT-based display, but not with LCDs (though Toshiba and Hitachi displayed a similar idea at the "Display 2006" show in Japan) and other display technologies. However, in 2011 Fairlight Instruments released its Fairlight CMI-30A, which uses a 17" LCD monitor with light pen control.

      A light pen detects a change of brightness of nearby screen pixels when scanned by cathode ray tube electron beam and communicates the timing of this event to the computer. Since a CRT scans the entire screen one pixel at a time, the computer can keep track of the expected time of scanning various locations on screen by the beam and infer the pen's position from the latest timestamp.

      The first light pen was created around 1955 as part of the Whirlwind project at MIT.

      During the 1960s light pens were common on graphics terminals such as the IBM 2250, and were also available for the IBM 3270 text-only terminal.

      The light pen found use during the early 1980s. It was notable for its use in the Fairlight CMI, and the BBC Micro. IBM PC compatible CGA, HGC and some EGA graphics cards featured a connector for a light pen as well. Even some consumer products were given light pens, such as the Thomson MO5 computer family as well as the Atari 8-bit and Commodore 8-bit home computers.

      Because the user was required to hold his arm in front of the screen for long periods of time or to use a desk that tilts the monitor, the light pen fell out of use as a general purpose input device.

      Since the current version of the game show Jeopardy! began in 1984, contestants have used a light pen to write down their first names, just before the taping of the show, wagers and responses for the Final Jeopardy! round.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_pen

      Remembering the old Atari game console of the 80's this morning (thinking I have one in a box somewhere around here. Note that this has nothing to do with the OP)....personally never did get into that computer gaming thing...but was impressed with what I saw back then....oh yeah really what did the number 69105 really mean?....(guessing it was just a kiss thing sort of thing)......
      Last edited by Pete; August 4th, 2014, 09:36 AM.
      - Pete

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