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  • io-homecontrol

    I just spotted this while I was looking at some control options for Velux roof windows - seems velux have joined in with this and their latest electric opening options are compliant

    anyone seen or heard anything else - looks kind of interesting and probably expensive.

    http://www.io-homecontrol.com/ioh.html

    Still looking to see if there are any plans for a pc interface.....

    Malarcy

  • #2
    I noticed Honeywell listed as one of the makers. If I am not mistaken, they are also on the z-wave alliance.

    Is it possible this is z-wave? It sounds a lot like it:

    "The io-homecontrol labelled solutions are based on a universal wireless technology that is ready for use. It requires no prior infrastructure (wired network, cabling, computer, software, control panel, etc.) and therefore generates no installation cost.
    The io-homecontrol "chips" are integrated into the products themselves"

    Comment


    • #3
      Could be - but their site talks only about a European standard - is zwave frequency different US to EUROPE?


      Digging a bit more I found this

      What is the wireless io-homecontrol technology?
      The io-homecontrol technology is based on a secure bidirectional protocol in Europe, with three standard channels of the radio frequency band between 868 and 870 MHz. This protocol incorporates many functions allowing unequalled levels of interoperability for applications in the home control field such as, for example, roller blinds, awnings, garage doors, roof windows, heating systems...
      What are the technical attributes / performances on which io-homecontrol is based?
      io-homecontrol is a technology based on European standards (standard EN 300.220). It uses three frequency bands to ensure data transmission. It provides a major improvement on existing techniques by integrating an acknowledgement principle. Furthermore, the protocol is able to ensure that all transmissions from one end of a house to the other, including passing through concrete walls, are successful

      linked here http://www.io-homecontrol.com/faq_technology.html


      malarcy

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      • #4
        I believe it is already obsolete. The motivation was noble, but the problem went away. When the group was founded in 2002, this was their take on the wireless market:
        How does io-homecontrol compare to other wireless standards?
        There is no available standard which could provide our members with the reliability and security required by their components. In addition, no other standard integrates the interoperability needed for their applications. That is why we have developed our own protocol while guaranteeing the most useful functions for the user.
        That is certainly not the case anymore, with ZWave and Zigbee both filling that need. It is telling that, after four years, there are only four members, where ZWave and Zigbee have around four-hundred members between them. And the founding member of io-homecontrol is Honeywell, which is a member of both the ZWave and Zigbee alliances.

        Comment


        • #5
          You might well be right - shame velux have decided to go down this route - it sounded like a good system.


          Malarcy

          Comment


          • #6
            Analog Devices have an IO homecontrol transceiver:
            http://www.analog.com/en/rfif-compon...pa_print_table

            You can also order an Evaluation board to connect it to the PC - this way you can control your Velux Windows.

            Cheers Martin

            Comment


            • #7
              I was just talking to Velux to see what options I have for motorising and automating my window blinds, and they mentioned io home control. Has anyone tried using this evaluation board with HS? With what kind of results?

              Cheers

              Comment


              • #8
                Has any clever guy here managed to get anywhere with io-homecontrol pc interface? I'l love to be able to control my velux windows.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by codey View Post
                  Has any clever guy here managed to get anywhere with io-homecontrol pc interface? I'l love to be able to control my velux windows.
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    nice simple idea, so how did you physically attach your device to the velux remote? did you simply solder cables onto where the buttons press in the remote?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      is the green PCB from the velux remote?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by codey View Post
                        nice simple idea, so how did you physically attach your device to the velux remote? did you simply solder cables onto where the buttons press in the remote?
                        Yes indeed.
                        I just removed the plastic film sticked to the PCB, which inherently removes the metallic domes of the buttons with it.
                        You then just have to solder 3 wires + 2 power wires to existing holes in the PCB (all buttons have a disk area on the PCB under the dome you removed and there are bridge holes between the two layers in these disks)

                        It's then just a matter of soldering the wires to the prototyping board. These wires are just pieces of resistor wires cuts (I always keep them to use as jumpers). The wires are enough to support the remote's board physicaly as well, no need for screws.

                        On the prototype board, I have 3 "universal" NPN transistors (good old 2N2222's) in open collector connected to the arduino's outputs and on the wires to the remote's board as voltage adapters (the Ethernet Arduino is 5V only, unfortunately)

                        That's it, everything else is just plug'n play (sort of ;-)
                        The sketch uses the Ethernet and the Webduino libraries and is just about one page of code.
                        I'm open to share it if anyone interested.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by codey View Post
                          is the green PCB from the velux remote?
                          Yes, exactly.
                          You can see it soldered with the jumper wires to the Prototyping shield.
                          The yellow led is part of the shield's kit.

                          The shield is then plugged to the Ethernet Arduino but with intermediate plugs in sandwich to cope for the height of the RJ45 socket and POE piggyback.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'd be interested in the code please buddy. I've receieved my second remote, I'll order a Arduino now

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by codey View Post
                              I'd be interested in the code please buddy. I've receieved my second remote, I'll order a Arduino now
                              Ok I see you mean it

                              I usually build my projects with components from my own stock. I tend to keep a supply of several kind of micro-controllers, sensors, discrete active and passive components, fittings, boxes in any conceivable dimensions and so on, not to mention all the stuff I accumulated in the last 35 years as an electronic engineer...

                              But I tried to trace everything I used in this very simple project to help you. I generaly source things from the usual suspects like RS, Farnell, Conrad and the like.

                              So as reference, here is what I used:

                              - An Arduino Ethernet with POE. This is just an Arduino Uno combined with the Ethernet shield on one board, it saves money and space. I generaly take the POE version as I tend to POE many of my projects, but you can safely purchase the version without the POE module and order and solder it later if needed.
                              I usualy shop at Watterott for micro-controller related stuff, so here is a link for the POE version.
                              Note that this version has no USB interface for programing like the Uno, so you'll need a one-time purchase of an FTDI interface and a mini-usb cable of course.
                              Now obviously, you could use an Arduino Uno, an Ethernet shield on top and finaly the proto shield, but then you would need a larger box.
                              If you don't plan to interface with ethernet, but USB or serial, then you just need a Uno + protoshield and rewrite the sketch to use serial commands from Homeseer instead of HTTP calls.

                              - A prototyping shield. I use this one. No need to install everything from the kit, just what will be usefull for your project. For this interface, I just soldered the led, it's resistor and the Arduino headers.

                              - A spare set of Arduino 6 and 8 pins headers to gives room for the extra height of the Arduino Ethernet and avoid the proto-shield touching the POE module and RJ45 socket. You just need to cut the wires so that everything stacks without seeing them.

                              - 3 2N2222 NPN transistors and 3 10K 1/8W resistors. The outputs of the arduino are connected through the 10K resistors to the base of the transistors, the emitters to ground and the collectors to the Velux remote's switches. Like I said earlier, this is needed because the Arduino Ethernet is only 5V and the remote is 3.3V, so we need to interface between the two.

                              - Finally, you need a box. I used a CAB002 from Ohmeron. Mine came from a local store but they can be sourced on the net. And a pair of self-adhesive nylon standoffs to fix the boards. One pair is enough, the other side is maintained by the holes that must be made in the box for the power and ethernet sockets.
                              On the cover, the LED hole can be enhanced by a LED cover but it needs to be cut flush with the internal face of the cover because the proto-shield supplied LED is 5mm.

                              I attach a quick & dirty (literally, because it's so simple I didn't bother to draw a shematic in the first place) shematic of the connexions between the Arduino and the remote.

                              Ok, that's it.
                              Next post will be software related.
                              Attached Files

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