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Remove cloud dependence of Tuya devices with Over the Air update

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  • Michael McSharry
    replied
    I did the install of Tasmota in the Tuya WS-1 smartplug. The ground-up install of Raspian onto a RPi with the tuya-convert software was 1/2 to 1 hour. The flash of the Tuya smartplug was about 5 to 10 minutes for each of my two smartplugs. I put a shorthand version in the process in Section 14.12 of http://mcsSprinklers.com/mcsMQTT.pdf including the Tasmota configuation of the WS-1 for the button, LED and relay.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pete
    replied
    Yeah got tired of tinkering with the Samsung Hub stuff via my tablet so built a VB of current version of Android just to help me in the programming stuff.

    Way easier on the fingers and eyes when it is presented on my desktop monitor (or laptop).

    Many Homeseer users will prefer to utilize your Tuya Plugin as it is more plug n play than hardware modifying and firmware upgrading WiFi boards.

    I have written little DIY's here for these mods and see many folks looking at the stuff but not too many folks actually modifying their stuff.


    Here have been JTAGing devices for a long time (going back to the 90's) and always have tinkered with my soldering iron.

    One great challenge was modifying the tiny MagicHome RGB controller. Thing is too is that they are so cheap then it is only the loss of time and effort updating these (and not money).

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  • bsobel
    replied
    Originally posted by Pete View Post
    Tuya has US servers. They are on the Alibaba cloud. You shouldn’t see traffic to China.

    Understood.

    First experiences with these WiFi devices a couple of years was slow (not so much relating to security - just slow for me) and I didn't like that I had to utilize my smart phone or tablet to interface with these devices and I am a bit over the edge wanting to see and control everything on my network.

    There is a discussion sort of related to this where a CT user has been adding WiFi devices all over his home and his has now lost track of where and what the devices were doing after sniffing the WiFi network.

    That and using 3rd party firmware on these very similiar devices provides me with a feature set that is unmatched with the common iOT firmware that all of these devices share.
    I understand that the interface is easy to use and configure with a smart phone or tablet. Still very used to using a keyboard / mouse as an interface.

    That is me.
    Completely understood, just documenting it for others that might wander into the thread later. My Tuya plugin uses direct TCP whenever available (which translates into the HS machine and the devices being on the same network, or a remote IP for the device is configured) otherwise MQTT. Like you I strongly prefer TCP local control. I also don't use their mobile app, I simply use HSMobile and ImperiHome since those devices just show up as normal HS devices. Again agree you can get more functionality if you flash custom firmware, again just documenting for the users that aren't at that level its not required

    Leave a comment:


  • Pete
    replied
    Tuya has US servers. They are on the Alibaba cloud. You shouldn’t see traffic to China.

    Understood.

    First experiences with these WiFi devices a couple of years was slow (not so much relating to security - just slow for me) and I didn't like that I had to utilize my smart phone or tablet to interface with these devices and I am a bit over the edge wanting to see and control everything on my network.

    There is a discussion sort of related to this where a CT user has been adding WiFi devices all over his home and his has now lost track of where and what the devices were doing after sniffing the WiFi network.

    That and using 3rd party firmware on these very similiar devices provides me with a feature set that is unmatched with the common iOT firmware that all of these devices share.
    I understand that the interface is easy to use and configure with a smart phone or tablet. Still very used to using a keyboard / mouse as an interface.

    That is me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael McSharry
    replied
    For me it not so much a matter of security, but a matter of being able to have a common way to interact with these and other IOT devices. Most of these devices are based upon Espressif micro-controllers and have common sensors and actuator hardware to allow low cost pricing. I prefer use of open source firmware that has widespread community support and is in continual mode of enhancement. I like to be able to tweak the operation of my device and not be dependent upon Tuya or other supplier for enhancements or fixes.

    For a simple example, assume that you have a IOT plug that is able to monitor and report power usage. You plug your washing machine into it. With Tasmota you can tell the device to report "Laundry Done" when power has been on and then off for a time that is characteristic of your washing machine. While you could setup events in Homeseer based upon polling the power from the plug, you have added complexity by getting Homeseer in the middle of some low level logic.

    There are many examples that I have documented in Section 14 of http://mcsSprinklers.com/mcsMQTT.pdf where I have been able to repurpose an IOT device because of having access to the Tasmota (or Espurna) source. My first was for garage door. The Alexa (or HS) command is "Open Garage Door". Is does not matter what the current state of the garage door is because the micro-controller used available inputs to sense the current door position and the micro-controller then either close the relay to simulate a button push or took no action because the door was already open. Another is to use the inputs to sense a beam break from a parallel set of light beams that traverse a doorway. It is then possible to know the direction of motion and turn the lights on/off as appropriate.

    It is always nicer to have devices that operate in a standard paradigm to minimize my user learning curve. Many of these IOT devices have firmware setup based upon Alexa/Google/Smartphone as the eco-system. They are not setup for machine to machine that is typical of a HA system. While the HA system can be used to peek and poke at the devices, it was not a mode they were designed to support. MQTT is designed for machine to machine operation so its use if like fitting a glove. The outstanding third part community that provides the alternative firmware such as Tasmota, Espurna and ESPEasy provides the realization of an easy way to get IOT devices into one's HA system in a well architect-ed manner.

    Leave a comment:


  • bsobel
    replied
    Tuya has US servers. They are on the Alibaba cloud. You shouldn’t see traffic to China.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pete
    replied
    I've noticed that using the cloud works fine most of the time but 90% the updating or configuration or use of issues relate to access of the companies' cloud which many times resides in China which for whatever reason is still very slow here in the midwest (near Chicago) and many times have to try updating multiple times before it works.

    Personally here like the use of the replacement firmware as it provides features and a better universality with most common transport and open source automation connectivity.

    That is me though.

    Well lately here dislike configuring some of these apps with my smartphone / tablet. That is me.

    I have compensated for this create virtual images running on my desktop.

    Leave a comment:


  • bsobel
    replied
    While I get why some may want to do this, normally Tuya devices are controlled by tcp and only require the cloud to configure.

    Leave a comment:


  • Remove cloud dependence of Tuya devices with Over the Air update

    I recently saw a YouTube video that takes one step by step for an Over The Air update of Tuya devices that results in the install of new firmware such as Tasmota to give users total control of their devices to communicate on their local network without ever calling home via the cloud. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5GYh470m5k

    I have one of the early Model WS-1 round plug which was 2" round that I had setup via the Tuya app and used for Alex control of desk lamp. I followed the video to put Tasmota on it. I did not start from scratch, but used an existing build of Debian Jessie running on an Odroid C1 rather than flashing a RPi with Stretch. No problem with the instructions, but when got to the point of running tuya-convert I realized that the host needed to have a WiFi interface and my C1 did not have it. Tomorrow I will use a RPi. I have seen other videos where the same thing was done so pretty confident it will work fine.

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    The YouTube video covers everything including setting up a RPi it references the actual install process of the new firmware is at https://github.com/ct-Open-Source/tuya-convert

    With new firmware you will be able to communicate with the device using HTTP or more conveniently with MQTT and one of the plugins such as mcsMQTT.



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