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  • Running HS on a VLAN with Ubiquiti

    anybody running homeseer on a separate VLAN with ubiquiti networking gear? Any tricks or things I should know before I embark on this journey? Thanks for the help...

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk


  • #2
    Yes I have Ubiquity ER-POE5 router and and an Edge Switch 24 POE 250W.

    I ave several VLANs configured and found this excellent guide that I followed and tailored to my setup.

    I have a VLAN for IP security cameras and Blue Iris VMS. VLAN keeps camera isolated but accessible by Blue Iris and HS.

    https://www.handymanhowto.com/ubiqui...etwork-design/

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    • #3
      Thanks! !

      I'm getting all Unifi stuff ,..but looking at this, I'm starting to feel I might be over my head. 🤐

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      • #4
        The Ubiquity hardware does have a deep learning curve but is very flexible on firewall rules, vlans and vpn config. I started early getting router switch setup for vlans and vpn before i bought my first IP camera.


        Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          Hi guys, any recommendation for home equipment? My current router (Netgear Nighthawk) is dying. I want to replace it with Ubiquity equipment. I need at least a few Ethernet jacks and will use a Gigabit switch for extra Ethernet ports near the router for now.

          I also want AC WiFi, but some compatibility to older WiFi (e.g. G, N). Not sure if Ubiquity has a single device or if I need two devices for my primitive setup. But I will need my system to grow as we plan to move in the next 6-12 months. So I would rather spend a bit now if needed.

          Any suggestions for equipment I need to get my network back up and running with both Ethernet and AC WiFi?

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          • #6
            Ubiquiti is releasing new products soon that I'm waiting on, which if you're lucky are available at times already via their Early Release program. The UniFi Dream Machine ($299) or UDM Pro ($379) are the successors to their popular systems where the regular one includes WiFi AC/N/G/B that can be expanded for extra large coverage with a UDM Beacon ($129) and the cheap USW-Mini ($29) is a nice PoE switch to extend wired network.

            The UDM Pro has a 10Gb SPF+ Port that can connect direct to a MoAC Fiber-to-the-Home connection. Only confirmation I've seen on that is from Canadian Bell Fiber user, and I'm inquiring with Google Fiber for a friend, and AT&T Fiber for myself.

            Since I needed networking now, I'm on a $60 TP-Link Archer C9 router with GbE LAN and AC/N/G/B WiFi that ties into the AT&T Pace GbE gateway (worst WiFi ever) running in DMZ, where I replaced the TP-Link firmware with dd-wrt for more options on VLAN, OpenVPN, etc.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by RoChess View Post
              Ubiquiti is releasing new products soon that I'm waiting on, which if you're lucky are available at times already via their Early Release program. The UniFi Dream Machine ($299) or UDM Pro ($379) are the successors to their popular systems where the regular one includes WiFi AC/N/G/B that can be expanded for extra large coverage with a UDM Beacon ($129) and the cheap USW-Mini ($29) is a nice PoE switch to extend wired network.

              The UDM Pro has a 10Gb SPF+ Port that can connect direct to a MoAC Fiber-to-the-Home connection. Only confirmation I've seen on that is from Canadian Bell Fiber user, and I'm inquiring with Google Fiber for a friend, and AT&T Fiber for myself.

              Since I needed networking now, I'm on a $60 TP-Link Archer C9 router with GbE LAN and AC/N/G/B WiFi that ties into the AT&T Pace GbE gateway (worst WiFi ever) running in DMZ, where I replaced the TP-Link firmware with dd-wrt for more options on VLAN, OpenVPN, etc.
              Thanks, I will look into the UDM/UDM Pro device and see what I can find. I just want any system I purchase to be able to grow in the future without losing my investment.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by NetworkGuy View Post
                Thanks, I will look into the UDM/UDM Pro device and see what I can find. I just want any system I purchase to be able to grow in the future without losing my investment.
                Those new products will be good for at least a decade. Of course something new will always be released eventually, but sometimes you have to buy 'now'.

                If you compare the UDM Pro to the USG-PRO-4 it is replacing then it is packed with a ton more options that will allow you to grow. The OLED mini display is what sets apart all the new models coming out, and even though it's a gimmick that you don't end up using a lot in day to day use, it'll be very useful when you are near the equipment. Allowing a quick overview of important stats, or as an indicator when issues occur without having to pull up a mobile device.

                For me I've done all the research and knowing I was going to get AT&T Fiber at 1000/1000 I also wanted something more future proof, and capable of giving me a path to upgrade some networking to 10Gbps without having to replace everything so soon after buying into Ubiquiti.

                Sucks to wait, but it'll be well worth it.

                If you need something now to bide the time, like I did, then I highly recommend: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PDLRHFW but the problem is finding a revision that is supported by dd-wrt (they tend to ship revision 5 or higher and you'll need rev4 or lower). Amazon return process is smooth though. Otherwise browse the list of models supported and pick one on sale. Benefits of dd-wrt or any of the other comparable router software replacement systems is that much more advanced features become available. Not as sleek as UniFi, but just as useful.

                https://download1.dd-wrt.com/dd-wrtv...0-2019-r41075/

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                • #9
                  Hopefully I didn't make an investment snake, as I have mine all installed and I've been running it for about 2 months. I won't lie ... the learning curve is pretty steep -at least for me -and I haven't even attempted vlans yet.

                  getting Sonos to work reliably took some time, and i have to RMA my cloudkey that's mine keeps disconnecting. I will say support has been pretty good and the community is about as good as homeseers :-)

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                  • #10


                    Originally posted by RoChess View Post

                    Those new products will be good for at least a decade. Of course something new will always be released eventually, but sometimes you have to buy 'now'.

                    If you compare the UDM Pro to the USG-PRO-4 it is replacing then it is packed with a ton more options that will allow you to grow. The OLED mini display is what sets apart all the new models coming out, and even though it's a gimmick that you don't end up using a lot in day to day use, it'll be very useful when you are near the equipment. Allowing a quick overview of important stats, or as an indicator when issues occur without having to pull up a mobile device.

                    For me I've done all the research and knowing I was going to get AT&T Fiber at 1000/1000 I also wanted something more future proof, and capable of giving me a path to upgrade some networking to 10Gbps without having to replace everything so soon after buying into Ubiquiti.

                    Sucks to wait, but it'll be well worth it.

                    If you need something now to bide the time, like I did, then I highly recommend: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PDLRHFW but the problem is finding a revision that is supported by dd-wrt (they tend to ship revision 5 or higher and you'll need rev4 or lower). Amazon return process is smooth though. Otherwise browse the list of models supported and pick one on sale. Benefits of dd-wrt or any of the other comparable router software replacement systems is that much more advanced features become available. Not as sleek as UniFi, but just as useful.

                    https://download1.dd-wrt.com/dd-wrtv...0-2019-r41075/
                    Great, thank you. I actually have an older TP-Link router running DD-WRT (as does my Nighthawk). As long as the Nighthawk limps along, I'll keep using it, but I will keep the TP-Link in reserve. My main issue with my Nighthawk is that it does not turn on reliably. All the LEDs come on very dim and it does nothing. If I turn it off then on again, it might turn on normally and operate. So once on, I leave it on.

                    One of the side effects is that my reserved DHCP IP address stopped working for my Pi-hole, so I removed the entry and the Pi-hole. I would like to reset the router, but I think it might put it over the edge.

                    So you would recommend the UDM Pro as a good replacement for my Nighthawk?

                    If so, I appreciate the recommendation, and I will check that out more.

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                    • #11
                      What's best for you depends on a lot of conditions. The Nighthawk no matter how fierce the name is a consumer product, whereas the UDM Pro is enterprise on a budget.

                      If you're primary interest is wired and SPF+ 10Gb then get the UDM-Pro and you can always add wireless to it.

                      I'm personally getting the regular UDM with a UDM Beacon to cover the WiFi needs of the main floor of the house, and replace the crappy AT&T Pace gateway by putting it in DMZ mode. Then hardwire a few USW-Mini's to connect all my wired equipment in the basement.

                      But that's because my initial contact with AT&T wasn't very fruitful to find out if I'm able to connect directly into the Fiber-to-the-Home MoAC outside via SPF+. I've got a 40Gbps direct fiber connection between my main workstation and primary storage server, and all the other wired systems are sufficient on 1GbE. Hell, my Roku Premiere+ 4K box is capped on a 100Mbps network chipset and streams 4K movies fine.

                      At my old location I had 4 separate routers (5 if I include Vera3) and it was a nightmare to manage. I've simplified that at new location, but want better central control and Ubiquiti via UniFi perfectly fits the bill.

                      Just don't want regrets buying older model when newer line is so close to launch. It is comparable to buying a 2015 car as brand new now with 2020 model about to be released. It will still get you a new car, but it won't have all the modern bells and whistles.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RoChess View Post
                        What's best for you depends on a lot of conditions. The Nighthawk no matter how fierce the name is a consumer product, whereas the UDM Pro is enterprise on a budget.

                        If you're primary interest is wired and SPF+ 10Gb then get the UDM-Pro and you can always add wireless to it.

                        I'm personally getting the regular UDM with a UDM Beacon to cover the WiFi needs of the main floor of the house, and replace the crappy AT&T Pace gateway by putting it in DMZ mode. Then hardwire a few USW-Mini's to connect all my wired equipment in the basement.

                        But that's because my initial contact with AT&T wasn't very fruitful to find out if I'm able to connect directly into the Fiber-to-the-Home MoAC outside via SPF+. I've got a 40Gbps direct fiber connection between my main workstation and primary storage server, and all the other wired systems are sufficient on 1GbE. Hell, my Roku Premiere+ 4K box is capped on a 100Mbps network chipset and streams 4K movies fine.

                        At my old location I had 4 separate routers (5 if I include Vera3) and it was a nightmare to manage. I've simplified that at new location, but want better central control and Ubiquiti via UniFi perfectly fits the bill.

                        Just don't want regrets buying older model when newer line is so close to launch. It is comparable to buying a 2015 car as brand new now with 2020 model about to be released. It will still get you a new car, but it won't have all the modern bells and whistles.
                        Thanks again. If the UDM Pro does not have WiFi, what other component would I need to get WiFi with the UDM Pro?

                        And would the UDM Pro (with whatever WiFi component is needed) allow me to connect my other two (DD-WRT) routers in a bridged configuration?

                        These bridged routers allow me to extend my network to two other locations so that I do not have to run Ethernet cables across my floor.

                        Appreciate the advice!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The benefit of UniFi is that it all ties together in regards to which device connects from where and what they are allowed to do. Of course you can connect other routers in bridge mode, but then inside Ubiquiti all the devices are seen as one past the bridges (unless bridges are UniFi based).

                          Those UDM Beacons solve that, you just plug them into any AC outlet on the wall and it'll extend the WiFi range wirelessly.

                          Keep in mind though that a single Ubiquiti AP might be enough to cover your entire house to begin with.

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                          • #14
                            Thank you, RoChess. Can you tell me what "SPF+" means? I missed asking about it earlier.

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                            • #15
                              I love my Unifi products. I have been running a US-24-250w as my Poe switch and a UAP-AC-LITE for the last 3 years. I now run my Unifi controller on an ubuntu VM on my ESXi host. Originally I had it loaded on an old RPI I had laying around.

                              For a firewall I run PFsense. For hardware I have a dual gigabit NIC mini PC based on an Intel i5-5200u (2 core 4 thread 2.2Ghz/2.7Ghz), 8GB of RAM AND A 74GB SSD HDD. It is a powerful tool and allows me to run
                              DHCP
                              DDNS
                              local DNS server
                              (all public requests are secured through DoT (DNS over TLS with Cloudflare, DNS requests to other sources are redirected back to my local DNS server and routed over DOT)
                              DNS filtering (PFBlockerNG)
                              Public IP filtering (PFBLOCKERNG)
                              VLANs
                              IDS
                              CODELQ queuing
                              Reverse proxy to handle requests from inside and outside my network.
                              VPN support for access to my local network when I am on the public Internet
                              VPN private browsing of the public Internet

                              At home I have some 44 devices counting:
                              Firewall
                              ESXi host
                              VMServers
                              VM NAS
                              Old Netgear READYNAS
                              IOT HA device’s
                              Media streamers
                              Security cameras
                              Smart TVs
                              HTPCs
                              Network TV Tuners
                              PCs
                              Laptops
                              Tablets
                              iPods
                              Smartphones
                              Console Systems
                              On the network spanning some 7 VLANs. I do this to segregate untrusted devices that don’t need Internet, untrusted devices that need Internet access, devices that need access to A network manage private VPN for browsing, personal devices,

                              While I like he Unifi Interface, it’s primary problem as a monitoring tool is that it is not platform agnostic. I use it for configuration, and patch management, But use a different central network monitoring tool to keep track of all my network, server, and storage equipment which I have tied to my pushover account for notifications.

                              I actually am planning on upgrading my network backbone to 10Gbps from my inside LAN interface on my firewall through my switch and to my ESXi host and primary NAS. I am currently waiting on a US-48-500w, and a pair of HD wireless APs.

                              Once I have those I have a few options. I could virtualize my PFsense firewall or I could build a new firewall. My hope is to virtualize my firewall on my ESXi host. My big reason for this is to cut down on total wattage. Currently, I sit at .145 Kilowatts/hour on my network rack). This costs me an additional $13.6 per month to run. while this is easily 6 times more than the average home with a modem and prosumer wireless router and no dedicated Poe switch, and redundant NAS environments.

                              My next purchase will be a Chelsio T520-SO-CR 10Gbps SFP+ NIC. I will install it on my ESXi home server and virtualize my PFsense firewall on it and adjust my network topology to make it the core firewall. Since my wan will still be limited to 1 GBPs I will use the onboard Intel i210 nic for my wan port.


                              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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