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Need to replace aging x10/insteon network

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  • #16
    Here testing ZWave replicated the HS ZNet like device in the attic to a Samsung Smartthings Hub on the main floor of the house TV room (great room?) and basement Leviton VRCOP.

    All three devices had no issues talking to ZWave modules (not wireless) on all three floors and outside of the home and most of the attached garage (~ 40 feet wide).

    - Pete

    Auto mator
    Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU - Mono 6.4X
    Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.4X

    X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation.

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    • #17
      I can also provide an excellent testament for UPB. It came out about the same time as Zwave was emerging. It is like an industrial solution that is bulletproof. I remember what I really liked about it when first installing was the built-in diagnostics so no guessing like x10 or Zwave at the time. It has been so many years that they just work as expected that I have never had to touch them. If they were to ever need service I would need to read the instructions again. I also have the almond switch/plug color scheme so was able to maintain it with UPB while if I do WiFi my choice is like the color options of the original Model T, but white instead of black.

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      • #18
        only 2 things pushed me away from upb… and my choice for zwave..
        1. cost
        2. no toggle - all decora - hence WAF was at a negative NO …. lol
        HW - i5 4570T @2.9ghz runs @11w | 8gb ram | 128gb ssd OS - Win10 x64

        HS - HS3 Pro Edition 3.0.0.435

        Plugins - BLRF 2.0.94.0 | Concord 4 3.1.13.10 | HSBuddy 3.9.605.5 | HSTouch Server 3.0.0.68 | RFXCOM 30.0.0.36 | X10 3.0.0.36 | Z-Wave 3.0.1.190

        Hardware - EdgePort/4 DB9 Serial | RFXCOM 433MHz USB Transceiver | Superbus 2000 for Concord 4 | TI103 X-10 Interface | WGL Designs W800 RF | Z-Net Z-Wave Interface

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        • #19
          I went from X10 to Insteon (combination X10 and Insteon) over about 20 years and got very frustrated with the lack of support and diagnostics with Insteon. It was very sensitive to the house wiring. About 4 years ago, I went to z-wave and have been very happy with it. It is widely available from a variety of suppliers, it is supported not only by HomeSeer but other big players. It was very easy to get to my detached garage and henhouse 50-100 feet from my house.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by TeleFragger View Post
            no toggle - all decora - hence WAF was at a negative NO …. lol
            I take it that your wife is upset that you can't get a new car with roll-up windows any longer, either? I'm sorry.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by sickpuppy View Post

              I take it that your wife is upset that you can't get a new car with roll-up windows any longer, either? I'm sorry.
              no my wife wants vehicles with tons of options; however, when I ask her if she uses these well desired/needed options.. she replies... no, how do I do that.... ughhhh
              HW - i5 4570T @2.9ghz runs @11w | 8gb ram | 128gb ssd OS - Win10 x64

              HS - HS3 Pro Edition 3.0.0.435

              Plugins - BLRF 2.0.94.0 | Concord 4 3.1.13.10 | HSBuddy 3.9.605.5 | HSTouch Server 3.0.0.68 | RFXCOM 30.0.0.36 | X10 3.0.0.36 | Z-Wave 3.0.1.190

              Hardware - EdgePort/4 DB9 Serial | RFXCOM 433MHz USB Transceiver | Superbus 2000 for Concord 4 | TI103 X-10 Interface | WGL Designs W800 RF | Z-Net Z-Wave Interface

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              • #22
                I would suggest you switch to 2245-222 Hub, it works perfectly fine with HS3 and supports X10 devices.

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                • #23
                  For what it is worth I have two buckets of junk. One is full of z-wave devices and the other of HomeSeer multi-sensors (first gen to be honest).
                  What works for me for lights is Lutron radio frequency light switches (they have serial interface for central control of all of them. Using Big5 plug-in to control them).
                  I'm using ESP8266 based WiFi relay boards for general purpose electrical switching (pumps, motors, heaters, hvac, sauna, pool, irrigation). I flash special software from zumungo.com into them and they do wonders for me. Both boards and software are dirt cheap. Count $5 per relay on average. The trick is that it is DIY project and you've got to get your hands dirty, but it is fun. Unlike Z-wave the WiFi connection is solid and never misses a beat. Integration with HS3 is again through Big5 as zumungo.com offers well documented open MQTT and TCP communication that Big5 manages well.
                  Finally for sensors (temperature, motion, keypads ) I'm using again ESP8266 or ESP32 based WiFi boards and again with zumungo.com and Big5.
                  My WiFi network is build around Ubiquity AP and is rock solid. One objection against WiFi in the past was relatively high power consumption that makes it unsuitable for battery applications. Guess what ? My battery powered WiFi motion sensors last 6 to 9 mo. in battery life. Cunning technologies like "deep sleep" , low power CPU etc make it happen.

                  Pictured below is 8 relays ESP8266 WiFi relay board that controls 3 HVAC units plus 2 gates. The other picture shows my DIY ESP32 based WiFi motion sensor next to my Radio RA light switches controlled by HS3.


                  Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2420.jpg Views:	0 Size:	103.4 KB ID:	1355578Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2419.jpg Views:	0 Size:	56.8 KB ID:	1355579

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                  • #24
                    +1 for ESP8266

                    Just completed a full revamp from X10

                    Wall switches, Dimmers, Plugs, RGB Controllers, RF/IR/BLE Bridge, Power monitoring, Wireless & wired sensors, Motion, Temp, Humidity, Door/Window, Water leak, Smoke detectors, doorbell, button triggers, etc.

                    In progress: Blinds, Door locks.

                    Everythings runs on Wifi/MQTT protocol.

                    https://templates.blakadder.com/index.html
                    ttps://forums.homeseer.com/forum/lighting-primary-technology-plug-ins/lighting-primary-technology-discussion/mcsmqtt-michael-mcsharry

                    Most devices can be bought for 5-10$ a piece (Costco for CSA devices, Aliexpress for everything else)

                    If you have some basic programming & soldering skills (for more advanced customization), it's definitely worth looking into.

                    Cheers,

                    Yann












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