Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Selling my Homeseer-driven home - how should I do this?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Selling my Homeseer-driven home - how should I do this?

    All:

    Hard to believe it but I started with Homeseer in 2000 at our 'forever' home. I've got it's hooks into just about everything. We are now thinking that we want to move and I'm wondering how to go about dealing with everything Homeseer does. Ideally I'd like to be able to refer the buyers to some level of support they could use - does anyone know of any such support? Other than that, should I strip it out completely, maybe reduce it back to bare bones? Anyone have any experience in this area?

    Thanks and congrats on 20 years

    #2
    Personally, I would remove it all. I wouldn't want to be stuck providing tech support to the new owners.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by joegr View Post
      Personally, I would remove it all. I wouldn't want to be stuck providing tech support to the new owners.
      +1
      HS 3.0.0.548: 1990 Devices 1172 Events
      Z-Wave 3.0.1.262: 126 Nodes on one Z-Net

      Comment


        #4
        I agree. Take it all out.
        How often do you need to attend to something related to HS? Even if it's as long as months, which is highly unlikely, do you want to get phone calls asking what to do each time?
        Mike____________________________________________________________ __________________
        HS3 Pro Edition 3.0.0.548, NUC i3

        HW: Stargate | NX8e | CAV6.6 | Squeezebox | PCS | WGL 800RF | RFXCOM | Vantage Pro | Green-Eye | Edgeport/8 | Way2Call | Ecobee3 | EtherRain | Ubiquiti

        Comment


          #5
          I've sold two houses that had a good amount of automation ..

          The first I left it all in place and that was a mistake, Most of it was 10+ years old so some things were aging out, plus it was a mix of technologies. I provided tech support as I could but ultimately I think it became a minor point of minor contention with the new owners.

          The second, also at 10+ years, I ripped all of it out before I even began to show the house. Some of it I was able to reuse in the new digs as well. Took a couple of days to replace the switches back and dumb things down, but made the move much easier for me.

          Comment


            #6
            My experience is that you need to decide upfront either way and stick with it. Remove everything that you’re not going to include otherwise it gets to be a point of contention which just turns everything negative.

            when I sold me house years ago I made the mistake of leaving some of the tech that I intended of taking out still in place. The potential buyer wanted everything even though he had no idea what it was. It quickly become a back and forth game until I completely put my foot down. Hind site i told myself in the future to remove everything that is not staying.
            HomeSeer 2, HomeSeer 3, Allonis myServer, Amazon Alexa Dots, ELK M1G, ISY 994i, HomeKit, BlueIris, and 6 "4k" Cameras using NVR, and integration between all of these systems. Home Automation since 1980.

            Comment


              #7
              I think it all depend on the new owner! But I guess the biggest chances are not going to be a tecky one! And I agree that you don't want to be a support line after!
              I can relate also to cars, the more custom you make it the less chances you find a buyer that really want it as you configured it!

              Comment


                #8
                +1 on removal.

                - Pete

                Auto mator
                Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb- Mono 6.12.X - HSTouch on Intel tabletop tablets
                Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.12.X
                HS4 Pro - V4.1.11.0 - Ubuntu 20.01/VB W7e 64 bit Intel Kaby Lake CPU - 32Gb - Mono
                6.10.0.104
                HS4 Lite -

                X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation-Tasmota-Espurna. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Smartthings hub, Hubitat Hub, and Home Assistant

                Comment


                  #9
                  Yeah... it's a pain in the a$$ and a great consumer of your time. Went through this 9 years ago. I'm not looking forward to moving again anytime soon...
                  HS3PRO 3.0.0.500 as a Fire Daemon service, Windows 2016 Server Std Intel Core i5 PC HTPC Slim SFF 4GB, 120GB SSD drive, WLG800, RFXCom, TI103,NetCam, UltraNetcam3, BLBackup, CurrentCost 3P Rain8Net, MCsSprinker, HSTouch, Ademco Security plugin/AD2USB, JowiHue, various Oregon Scientific temp/humidity sensors, Z-Net, Zsmoke, Aeron Labs micro switches, Amazon Echo Dots, WS+, WD+ ... on and on.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I’d just remove everything that can’t be used manually. This has happened to me before that why I decided to just use in wall switches that can be turned on/off manually at the switch and the rest just take and fly. Typically motion sensors, Zwave garage door openers, outlet plugs, etc. are just for us that like to tinker to make everything automated. Last place I sold some years ago I negotiated to provide 8 hours of converting everything left there that could be controlled by Alexa and showing them how to use it. Saved be a $1,500 roof repair. I told them after that everything else was on them. They have called me a few times and even recommended me (not that I want that) to friends to do some training on Alexa, which I never did. But HS training?/ HELL NO!1 it’s a daily learning task for me! Haha I can still start my coffee pot from bed which is the most important thing in my home automation system!1 Lol

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Do you have everything documented to the smallest detail?
                      Every witch, every light, every little doodad?
                      every controller?
                      Every license(Can they be transferred? if not, the new owners will have to buy new licenses)
                      Every little script will need to be explained down to 'even dad can understand'.
                      The HS controller will need to be severely documented. Username/passwords, maintenance, backup/restore, disaster recovery.
                      Manual overrides where needed.

                      I work in user support. There's no way I can document even a simple setup such as mine for a 'common user'

                      And one thing I have learned in my more than 2 dozen years as support is that if people don't have an interest in something, it's very hard for them to learn about it.
                      And if the system is very automated, so that they don't have to learn anything about it immediately, they will most likely procrastinate even starting on learning it.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        One other concern I would have: I installed my home automation devices myself. If something was to go wrong (even if it was not the fault of the device), I do not want to give the new owners the idea of suing since the devices were not installed by a "licensed electrician".

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Well here's the one vote in the other column. IMO it's a matter of "presenting and selling" it properly. Most of my devices are switches that can just be left in place. There are some lights, mostly aesthetic that have no switch. Under eaves, deck lights, XMAS decorations, etc. I personally think that a selling point will be things like my instant hot water system that works flawlessly. The day one part of that system fails it will simply be that you have to wait for the hot water like everyone else does.

                          Sure I'll provide a support period and transfer licenses. I transferred my Zee license to a friend when I gave it to him. I don't see this as a big deal as the new homeowner can delete all existing users and create his own username. I think HS is easy to manage in that regard.

                          AFA scripts, even I can't write one. I would take the couple I use (downloaded here) and just remove them from the system since they're not critical, they're simply informational.

                          As an aside, my wife and I had an open house at XMAS time and many of our neighbors commented on how nice the house looked with lights on at appropriate times, etc. I mentioned the hot water system and two of them are in the process of setting up their own auto on lights and hot water recycling.

                          I just don't think it's a dead end as far as selling. I'll let you know in about 7 years.


                          Comment


                            #14
                            Reading the previous posts it is obvious that we do not trust anybody to maintain the system(s) we built.
                            So, what will happen if we suddenly die ?
                            In my case I told my wife to go to https://forums.homeseer.com/forum/, using google translation, OR have a contractor removing everything off.
                            Visit zee e-maison : http://www.e-maison.com

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Pierre View Post
                              So, what will happen if we suddenly die ?
                              .
                              i got my son interested with a HS pi edition a few years ago. He is now capable of maintaining in this case or of other memory loss situations.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X