Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How can I integrate my mosquito misting system with HS3?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    How can I integrate my mosquito misting system with HS3?

    I have an early generation Mistaway mosquito mister. It has a programmable interface on the unit for scheduling, manual misting, etc., and a 3-function 418MHz remote control. I would like to integrate control with HS3 for scheduled and manual operation and need suggestions of what my options might be. More recent models of the system have optional subscription-based cloud access via phone app. AFAIK retrofit kits are only available for new models than mine, and subscription/cloud is a non-starter for me anyway. No local API.

    Here are my thoughts so far.

    1. RPi or other HS3-controllable device hard-wired to my remote control to provide contact closures to activate the buttons.

    2. Same as above except hard-wired to control panel on unit (haven't opened it up to investigate yet but plan to soon).

    3. RPi with RF transmitter hat. Program to emulate my remote control. So far only finding a 433MHz transmitter hat. Haven't investigated how to clone the RF signals.

    4. Other?

    Appreciate any input that helps me solve this. A few images below in case anyone is curious what it looks like.

    Thanks.


    Click image for larger version

Name:	Capture3.JPG
Views:	134
Size:	163.8 KB
ID:	1369124

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Capture4.JPG
Views:	136
Size:	60.1 KB
ID:	1369125

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Capture.JPG
Views:	163
Size:	48.4 KB
ID:	1369121

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Capture2.JPG
Views:	140
Size:	75.1 KB
ID:	1369122

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Capture1.JPG
Views:	132
Size:	127.0 KB
ID:	1369123
    -Wade

    #2
    You could too modify a SonOff or other WiFi device with Tasmota / Espurna / etc and use MQTT to control it / automate it with mcsMQTT.
    - Pete

    Auto mator
    Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb- Mono 6.12.X - HSTouch on Intel tabletop tablets
    Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.12.X
    HS4 Pro - V4.1.11.0 - Ubuntu 20.01/VB W7e 64 bit Intel Kaby Lake CPU - 32Gb - Mono
    6.10.0.104
    HS4 Lite -

    X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation-Tasmota-Espurna. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Smartthings hub, Hubitat Hub, and Home Assistant

    Comment


      #3
      My first step would be with Sonoff RF Bridge to learn the RF code from transmitter and then be able to replay it via MQTT messges. The variable is the RF filter on the base unit and its sensitivity to 433 Mhz of the Sonoff and the 418 or the remote. Same question for the Sonoff in learning.

      The ESP8266(e.g. Wemos D1 mini) or Arduino would seem like a better fit for the controller than a RPi for the other hacking approaches. Staying with the remote seems like a less risky approach. Depending upon skills at tracing and tapping into circuits vs. 3D print or other physical mounting approach for the three solenoids would drive the direction. Either should work. In the past I hacked a Dish TV remote that had both IR and RF to get the RF part. wanted my Ocelot IR that was interfaced to HS to talk RF to my upstairs TV.

      Comment


        #4
        Pete and Michael, thanks for the feedback. Each of the technologies/components you've mentioned have been of interest to me for various projects although I've not started into any of them yet other than to briefly tinker with an arduino via a learning kit. Need to do something similar to pick up pulses from my water meter, too, so maybe I can kill both birds with similar stones.

        Michael, you lost me on the solenoids reference. Are you suggesting solenoids to press the buttons on the remote? I've not seen anything like that before.

        Thanks.
        -Wade

        Comment


          #5
          For those that are more mechanically than electrically skilled then using a set of three solenoids used for robotics or similar endeavors could be mounted so that when the solenoid is activated it will push the button on the remote. If the remote it mounted on top then gravity will return the solenoid to it quiescent position when deactivated. Seems like a 3D print would be the easiest way to make a holder for the setup, but wood or other material could be used too.

          Electrically this is just three digital outputs on a ESP8266 or similar controller. A Wemos D1-mini is what I tend to gravitate toward these days because of its small size and simplicity. Tasmota firmware configured for 3 relay outputs is all the firmware that is needed. MQTT communication back to HS via mcsMQTT or other MQTT plugin handles the HS side.

          If you do not want a WiFi solution and prefer wired then Arduino would be my second choice. In this case you do not have the easy firmware solution of Tasmota and will need to make your own sketch or find something similar and hack it. I really do not like RPi for controller applications. The SD card write cycle limit and in general the behemoth Linux OS just make it a poor choice for dedicated control applications. It is great for software intensive application and used them or their equivalents for many things.

          Tasmota already has pulse counters in the stock firmware so it would also be a good solution for your other need. For my water meters I used Sonoff Basic ($5) and set them up to count pulses. I did a mod in the firmware for the Digiten flow sensor meter that I'm using to monitor the Osmosis filter I'm using. Pulses are converted to ounces of flow before sending via MQTT, but it could be done just as easily with stock Tasmota and the expression support in mcsMQTT to perform the pulse to oz conversion.

          I have water meters for whole house, irrigation and the filter. I had previously used 1-wire DS2423 to count pulses but migrated to the WiFi/Tasmota approach over time.

          Comment


            #6
            Great information. Thanks very much Michael. As I find time for these projects I will dig in and learn the particulars.
            -Wade

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Michael McSharry View Post
              For those that are more mechanically than electrically skilled then using a set of three solenoids used for robotics or similar endeavors could be mounted so that when the solenoid is activated it will push the button on the remote. If the remote it mounted on top then gravity will return the solenoid to it quiescent position when deactivated. Seems like a 3D print would be the easiest way to make a holder for the setup, but wood or other material could be used too.
              The more I think about this idea the more I like it for my first go at this. Parts for my misting system including the remote are getting difficult to find ($$$) and definitely less risk of me doing irreparable damage with this approach.

              I suppose something like this is what you're suggesting?
              https://www.amazon.com/Adafruit-Mini...ustrial&sr=1-1
              The chassis may be just small enough for 3 side-by-side to work the 3 buttons on the remote, although force is only 80g. By my estimate the buttons require about 160-170g (static) to press and hold the button down. I don't need it to hold the button, and I'm not sure how dynamic loading comes into play here. May just have to buy one and test it out. Can get 500g force in a bit larger chassis size but would add a level of complexity to the project to stagger the solenoids.

              BTW I realize these can be bought directly from China much cheaper but not sure I want to deal with shipping time uncertainties with current conditions.

              Originally posted by Michael McSharry View Post
              Electrically this is just three digital outputs on a ESP8266 or similar controller. A Wemos D1-mini is what I tend to gravitate toward these days because of its small size and simplicity. Tasmota firmware configured for 3 relay outputs is all the firmware that is needed. MQTT communication back to HS via mcsMQTT or other MQTT plugin handles the HS side.
              Any thoughts on the rest of my hardware list?

              Serial to USB adapter
              https://www.amazon.com/SparkFun-1405.../dp/B06W2KKW64

              D1-mini
              https://www.amazon.com/Development-M.../dp/B07H22CDQ8

              Relay module
              https://www.amazon.com/ELEGOO-Channe...l%2C186&sr=1-3
              Or maybe 3 of these
              https://www.amazon.com/Valefod-1-Cha...ustrial&sr=1-6


              Once I have the hardware on order I'll start studying the flashing process, software utilities and where to find firmware.

              Originally posted by Michael McSharry View Post
              Tasmota already has pulse counters in the stock firmware so it would also be a good solution for your other need. For my water meters I used Sonoff Basic ($5) and set them up to count pulses.
              I'll look into this once I get the mosquito mister project up and running.

              Thanks.
              -Wade

              Comment


                #8
                Misting is just pump on/off with a schedule? If so just find a way for the pump to start when 120v is supplied. The control part in HS is straightforward.

                This looks to me like just high pressure irrigation. Plenty of z-wave and wifi irrigation controllers and software.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by dmiller View Post
                  Misting is just pump on/off with a schedule? If so just find a way for the pump to start when 120v is supplied. The control part in HS is straightforward.

                  This looks to me like just high pressure irrigation. Plenty of z-wave and wifi irrigation controllers and software.
                  Would be nice if it were that simple but I don't think it is. Misting cycles are initiated by the electronic controller. Wouldn't imagine it could work for application of power to start it. Wouldn't be surprised if it has built-in safeties to prevent that happening.

                  Before each misting it mixes the material in the barrel by diverting the pumped liquid back into the tank for a couple minutes via a 3-way valve. Could probably remove the controller altogether and put in a few relays integrated with HS3, but at this point I'd rather have the native controller with its liquid level monitoring, pressure monitoring, etc.
                  -Wade

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Check out this video as a possible starting point for an Arduino based solution that mimics the remote. He uses an Alexa to control things, but you could use MQTT and HomeSeer, and then use a smart speaker via HomeSeer for voice. He also has his code posted, and linked in the video write-up. Sure it is for a gas fireplace, but the concept could be applied.
                    Karl S
                    HS4Pro on Windows 10
                    242 Devices
                    56 Z-Wave Nodes
                    37 Events
                    HSTouch Clients: 3 Android, 1 iOS
                    Google Home: 3 Mini units 1 display

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Excellent video showing how to understand RF data. I was unaware of AppliedWireless.com so additional good info. Turns out they have a 418 MHz module so the general strategy should work for the mister as well. The SDR is a fun device. I have found multiple uses for it and it is cheap. There is some really good software for decoding common 433MHz digital encodings.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X