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FGBS-222 Smart implant for doorbell settings for momentary switch

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    FGBS-222 Smart implant for doorbell settings for momentary switch

    I recently acquired a Fibaro smart implant FGBS-222 (from https://www.robbshop.nl/zwave-deurbel?sqr=deurbel&), including an relay, an 12volt power source, and momentary switch.
    I'm using it with an older 8volt doorbell -with a bell. Getting this to work using Hs3 pro is giving me some headache. Anyone who has this working and willing to share some knowledge

    1.
    I added the smart implant into Hs3 and its giving me one switch and several other options like temperature (build in).
    Pushing the attached momentary switch results in the bell starts ringing and never stops, until the momentary switch is pushed again. So that is not ok. Since the ringing never stops! How to get the momentary switch acting in the implant as an momentary switch.
    Which parameter(s) to change or how to get this right,

    2.
    Since there is a on/off switch in Hs3 I would expect that that has some effect as well. But whether it is on or off does not make a difference? I was expecting this could be used for switching the bell(sound) off or being able to start the bell ringing? Are there any settings needed to get this working as well?

    3.
    How to get a notification in Hs3 when the momentary switch has been pushed? Nothing happens (not an On or Off, neither any other notification). The device is associated to Hs3. I have an event that normally would send an message when an device status changes.

    #2
    The full manual for the Implant is available here.

    Parameter 20 controls input 1 (0 = Normally Closed / 1 = Normally Open / 2 = monostable / 3 = bistable)
    Parameter 21 controls input 2 (0 = Normally Closed / 1 = Normally Open / 2 = monostable / 3 = bistable)

    It looks like NO (and NC) cannot be used to activate scenes but only for for basic doorbell ringing.

    If you set the above parameters to monostable you can control the timeout and activate scenes.

    Parameter 156 controls input 1 timeout (1 = .1 second / 2 = .2 second and so on)
    Parameter 157 controls input 2 timeout (1 = .1 second / 2 = .2 second and so on)

    Scene activation is evidently not enabled by default.

    Parameter 40 controls scene activation for input 1.
    Parameter 41 controls scene activation for input 2.

    Since you have no way of controlling how visitors will ring the bell (tap, push & hold and so on) you may need to experiment in order to get the scenes to activate reliably.

    I don't own one of these so I have no way to validate any of this information.

    Good luck.

    Let us know how it works.

    Comment


      #3
      Alex Thanks for your reply. Will try this tomorrow and let you know how it turns out.

      Comment


        #4
        You're quite welcome. I am looking forward to hearing how this works out for you. I can think of an application or two in which one of these devices might come in handy.

        Comment


          #5
          Just a heads up a few of us have had https://forums.homeseer.com/forum/ho...-child-devices]a few challenges[/url] with the inclusion of this device - but it does work well though, I installed one inside my ducted aircon to make it Z-Wave controllable
          ‚Äč
          What the actual?!? When I make a sarcastic remark or joke it is moderated/deleted.
          But you specifically go out of your way to label multiple HS4 issues that cause data loss/crash of HS4 to be "grumbles".
          I can't even begin to put into words how offensive this is.

          Comment


            #6
            Gave it a try today. Looks like setting parameter 156 is not working. If I set it with a value per example with 5, it starts connecting and after returning it shows value 0. I first made sure setting parameter 20 at 2, which seems to work (returning the screen with value 2). But I still have to push the button twice to stop the doorbell ringing.

            Also parameter 40 seems to adapt the value I set. Although I do not have any clue how it activates anything when detecting the button pushed? Is it the application status part?


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              #7
              Still not working as expected. Looks like the Central Scene is the one to use here. But it did only update once after pressing the button. Pushing the button starts ringing the bell and an second push on the button stops ringing the bell. So that's not what I need. Parameter 156 and 157 would be the one to use but are not accepting a new value.

              I would also expect that using the switch (control) in Hs3 could be used for performing some action on the bell as well. But it seems not being used at all. So why is it there?

              Apparently some of you got this working? What Am I overseeing here?

              Click image for larger version

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                #8
                I think I may have identified the problem. On the web page for your device it indicates that it comes with a Fibaro Binary Sensor, which is different from the Implant and has different parameter settings.

                The manual is here.

                Reset the sensor to factory defaults and try this:

                Parameter 03 controls input 1 (0 = Normally Closed / 1 = Normally Open / 2 = monostable / 3 = bistable)
                Parameter 04 controls input 2 (0 = Normally Closed / 1 = Normally Open / 2 = monostable / 3 = bistable)

                Parameter 01 controls timeout for input 1.
                Parameter 02 controls timeout for input 2.

                In both cases it looks like 0 is used for momentary contact.

                All the the scene control parameters are in the manual so you can experiment with those.

                As I said, I have no way to test this, so I'm "flying by the seat of my pants" here.

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                  #9
                  Alex_W No it is an implant. They used the sensor before in older products. Click image for larger version

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                    #10
                    Ah, I see.

                    I don't have a solution, but from looking at the photo I may have a workaround if you are interested.

                    Give me time to do some research.

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                      #11
                      Always interested in a good workaround

                      Comment


                        #12
                        OK. If I were designing this for my use I would do it in such a way as to ensure that the doorbell would function independently of the Implant. That way if the Implant fails or is removed the doorbell still works as it should. The only additional hardware needed is an inexpensive 12VDC DPDT relay. A DPST would also work, or you could simply use a second Form C relay like the one you already have and wire the coils in parallel.

                        This method isolates the manual ringing of the bell from the Implant and still allows the pushing of the doorbell button to trigger events in HomeSeer. Wiring Output 2 in parallel with the doorbell button enables you to activate the bell via the HomeSeer (provided you can activate the output independent of Input 2). You'll still need to work through the programming, but at least you'll have a functioning doorbell in the mean time, and the system no longer relies on an Implant Input to ring (or stop ringing) the bell. Of course the 12VDC supply would also power the Fibaro Implant. I left this out of the diagram so as not to muddy the waters and because it is pretty much understood.

                        Depending on the level of sophistication you require from this circuit, a Fibaro Implant might be a bit of overkill. If all you want is for notifications to be sent or scenes to be run when the doorbell button is pressed a simple binary device would do the trick. You could then use the Implant for some more elegant applications. Alternatively, if you don't require HomeSeer to ring the doorbell you could eliminate the parallel wiring of Output 2 and use IN 2/OUT2 for a completely separate operation. I'm just "running this up the flagpole" since I don't know your ultimate plans for this device.
                        Attached Files

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                          #13
                          Looks good. Only thing I was wondering about in the scheme, is the Doorbell Button wiring, as I see it, if it is closed there will be a short circuit?

                          Looking for a relay i found this one: https://opencircuit.nl/Product/12V-S...dule-Assembled is that the one you mention? I can only see 6 connections on it is that ok?

                          I am also interested in the option you mentioned without the implant. I have laying around a fibaro doubble switch which can be used. A 12volt supply I have already in use with the existing setup.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by nl_user View Post
                            Looks good. Only thing I was wondering about in the scheme, is the Doorbell Button wiring, as I see it, if it is closed there will be a short circuit?

                            Looking for a relay i found this one: https://opencircuit.nl/Product/12V-S...dule-Assembled is that the one you mention? I can only see 6 connections on it is that ok?

                            I am also interested in the option you mentioned without the implant. I have laying around a fibaro doubble switch which can be used. A 12volt supply I have already in use with the existing setup.
                            No short circuit. The switch is in series with the 12VDC positive wire, which is connected to one side of the relay coil. The 12VDC negative wire is connected to the other side of the relay coil. When the switch closes the coil is supplied with voltage, the relay is activated and one pole rings the bell while the other pole closes input one on the Implant.

                            The outputs on the Implant are potential-free (dry-contact) so output 2 is essentially just another switch in parallel with the button. If both the button and Output 2 are open, the bell is silent. If either one closes the bell rings until they are both open again. If you don't need to have HomeSeer ring the bell there is no reason connect Output 2.

                            The relay you linked to is a 12VDC SPDT (single-pole / double throw). You would need two of them. A better choice is a 12VDC DPDT (double-pole / double-throw) which is essentially two independent switches attached to a single coil. This is a DPDT relay:

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                            On this relay the vertical terminals (7 & 8) at the bottom are for the coil. The lower pair of horizontal terminals (5 & 6) are the poles. The center pair of horizontal terminals (3 & 4) are normally-open contacts. The upper pair of horizontal terminals (1 & 2) are normally-closed contacts (in the circuit above these normally-closed contacts are not used).

                            If no voltage is applied to the coil (when the doorbell button is not being pressed) terminal 5 is connected to terminal 1 and terminal 6 is connected to terminal 2.

                            If 12VDC is applied to the coil (when the doorbell button is being pressed) terminal 5 is connected to terminal 3 (thus activating input 1 on the Implant) and terminal 6 is connected to terminal 4 (thus ringing the bell). The odd numbered terminals and the even numbered terminals are isolated from one another, so a DPDT relay acts like two independent relays activated by the same coil.

                            Different relays use different terminal configurations so you'll need to follow thew wiring diagram that comes with your relay. As long as you get a 12VDC DPDT relay it will work with the parts you already have as long as it is wired correctly.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Thanks. I will first buy one of these relays. If I have it (hopefully after the weekend) I will try to build this setup and see how that works out. Seems promising though. Learned a lot today. Would this one be a better choice? : https://www.allekabels.nl/relais/737...iABEgJXBvD_BwE ?

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