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    Exterior Z-Wave GFI Outlet

    I think I know this answer since Googling so far has had no results...

    Does anybody know of a z-wave 1 gang GFI outlet that is rated for external use?...actually any GFI z-wave outlet that is not the "plug it into a standard outlet dongle" type.

    Thanks!

    #2
    Yeah, i have yet to come across one. The alternative though is same as a regular outlet, put the Z-wave outlet into a weather rated box/cover and make sure it's wired into the same circuit as a GFCI outlet. Of course check you local ordinance codes, consult with an electrician, etc to see if this is allowed in your area.

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      #3
      Originally posted by ts1234 View Post

      Does anybody know of a z-wave 1 gang GFI outlet that is rated for external use?...actually any GFI z-wave outlet that is not the "plug it into a standard outlet dongle" type.
      Is there even a ZWave GFCI outlet that exists, period?

      In my house, the GFCI that protects my outside plugs is located in an inside plug, "up wind" from the outside plugs.

      Comment


        #4
        I have never seen a Z-Wave GFCI. I don't think they exist. Maybe it's a code thing. In any case, a GFCI outlet protects the whole circuit so even when you plug something in that is not a GFCI outlet you should be protected. And if you need z-wave control exactly for the plug where the GFCI outlet is installed then you can move the GFCI outlet to another place in the same circuit. Check with an electrician, though.

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          #5
          I may be misinterpreting this but...they make it sound like by code...THAT outlet needs to be GFI instead of somewhere on the circuit. They use the word "outlet" not circuit. I hope I'm wrong.

          Clip from the Internet.

          Outdoor electrical outlets differ from indoor outlets because they have watertight covers that protect the outlet even with a cord plugged in. Plus, the National Electrical Code requires all outdoor outlets to be GFCI outlets (ground fault circuit interrupter outlets).

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            #6
            "But not all GFCI protected outlets in a home will have these buttons. If placed at the beginning of a circuit, a GFCI outlet that is wired correctly will protect all downstream outlets in that circuit, even if they look like standard household outlets. A good example is a home with three bathrooms. Although all bathrooms have GFCI protection, there may be only one outlet that is an actual GFCI receptacle. The others are protected by correct wiring at the GFCI and being downstream of it in the circuit. Other examples are exterior outlets that may be protected by a GFCI at the garage or in the basement , kitchen outlets that are protected by a GFCI further down the countertop, or a GFCI breaker that is located at the electrical panel that is protecting all outlets in that circuit."

            https://stricklandinspections.com/kn...set-locations/

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              #7
              Thanks All! I've done a lot of wiring and 100% agree on the functionality. I just was not sure if the code was set that way for another reason. Something as simple as an inspectors didn't need to trace or test the circuit, he could see the GFI outlet in that position.

              I could do something as simple as put a GFI on the gang box inside that I'm pushing the outlet from to the exterior and then just mount a z-wave receptacle. I could even cheat and push it from the switchable z-wave outlet on the inside since it never gets used except at Halloween and XMAS and it works for both to come on at dark.

              I've said this before... I am always floored by the lack of outdoor z-wave products several decades into home automation in general.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by ts1234 View Post
                I may be misinterpreting this but...they make it sound like by code...THAT outlet needs to be GFI instead of somewhere on the circuit. They use the word "outlet" not circuit. I hope I'm wrong.

                Clip from the Internet.

                Outdoor electrical outlets differ from indoor outlets because they have watertight covers that protect the outlet even with a cord plugged in. Plus, the National Electrical Code requires all outdoor outlets to be GFCI outlets (ground fault circuit interrupter outlets).
                Actually, thinking about it, all our outlets outside are GFCI and they have a cover over it, even then ones mounted on the sofit. In contrast, in the bathrooms where we have double sinks only one side has GFCI and the other one doesn't. So the electrician seems to know what he was doing (plus of course there was inspection). Hence, at least here in CA it might indeed be required that each outlet outside is GFCI.

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                  #9
                  ts1234 I have GFCI breakers in my electrical panel and just regular outlets in the bathrooms at my house.

                  Could you replace the breaker with a GFCI breaker and remove the GFCI outlet and replace it with a regular outlet?

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                    #10
                    thx Mulu!...Drhtmal...that's absolutely the kind of stuff I don't know and likely to Mulu's point probably varies from state-to-state or even city.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by mulu View Post
                      Hence, at least here in CA it might indeed be required that each outlet outside is GFCI.
                      Not true for here in California. Only that the outlet must be protected by GFCI. My house is set up that way with the GFCI in an outlet before the outside outlet. (and was inspected too).

                      There is a requirement that outlets protected by GFCI be labelled as such, though.

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                        #12
                        Hmm, ok, then our electrician did go overboard...

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                          #13
                          Nothing wrong with going overboard when it comes to safety. But at about $15 - 20 a pop, the cost of GFCIs can add up....

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                            #14
                            It may not be overboard. It is possible they decided that it was cheaper just to install the GFCI plugs where they were needed rather than wiring the outlets in series.

                            And if the GFCIs were a retrofit, much easier to place them where needed rather then bothering to find out where the upstream outlets are, etc.

                            And electricians buy those things in bulk, so they probably get a better price then us mere mortals.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              aa6vh Ah, that's a very good point. If they use GFCIs everywhere outside they can tie it in with 'inside circuits' rather than having to run long wires for all the 'outside circuits'. Not only do you save a lot of wire but also a lot of work. That makes a lot of sense.

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