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    #16
    Originally posted by SteveW View Post


    A PC that cannot be upgraded to Windows 11 will become a security/privacy risk in two years, when MS stops supporting Windows 10.
    Just for the record, it is over 3 years (Oct 14, 2025)

    Jon

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      #17
      I am running a mini pc. Just looked it up on Amazon and it is not available anymore, but it has been pretty stable for me. It is mounted in an enclosure in the garage as it does not get as cold/hot as outside, but is out of the way.
      A computer's attention span is as long
      as it's powercord.

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by randy View Post
        I have used Supermicro servers because I really like to have IPMI for remote operations. With IPMI you can work with every aspect of the server remotely, eve to the point of remotely installing an O/S or other software.

        They have also been very reliable, with the only hardware problem I’ve had with several dozen servers over the last couple of decades is a couple of Samsung SSDs.
        This. I run HS on a Windows VM and set up ESXi over the IPMI. I have had ESXi running now for 1.5 years without a reboot on that machine. XEON with ECC memory and raid 0.
        HS3 Pro Edition 3.0.0.435 (Windows Server 8.1 on ESXi box)

        Plug-Ins Enabled:
        Z-Wave:,RaspberryIO:,AirplaySpeak:,Ecobee:,
        weatherXML:,JowiHue:,APCUPSD:,PHLocation:,Chromecast:,EasyTr igger:

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          #19
          Originally posted by kenm View Post

          As a base OS for HS4 I don't see an advantage to 11.

          What features does 11 provide for an HS4 host? I'm open to learning.
          I’m not saying there is an advantage, just that there is no reason to avoid it as long as your hardware supports it. Specifically TPM. As far as HS is concerned, there is no real difference. I’m still good with Windows 7 or 10 for sure. Don’t care much for the 8 or 8.1 variants.

          My new desktop and laptop both run 11 pro and I like it.

          Comment


            #20


            I agree with Randy, in a perfect world I'd choose a SuperMicro server/motherboard any day. But they ain't cheap and if you go with a rackmount/1U type of chassis then the noise can be unbearable depending on where it will live.

            IMO, the perfect platform for HS is an old laptop. Since it has to remain on 24 x 7, power consumption is usually minimal and you have a built-in UPS. The ability to pick-up the laptop and walk it over to an area of your house for troubleshooting events and devices is invaluable. Takes up minimal space because you configure it to stay on even when the lid is closed, but the screen goes off to minimize power draw.

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              #21
              I run HS in a VM. Makes it easy to backup the whole PC as well as move to other PCs id needed.

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                #22
                Here run a few of the Lenova M93A's in Ubuntu and Windows 2016 server. Oldest one is running Windows 11 desktop and Ubuntu 24.04 (VB) that I use remotely all of the time. (house #2). The Ubuntu Lenova's run Oracle Virtual Box with Windows OS's or HA OS's and for running Microsoft SAPI TTS. So here it is a hybrid configuration of using the Lenova's for VB's (VMs) and Windows 2016 server and Ubuntu Server.

                The Windows 2016 servers are mostly used for running RDP to Homeseer Designer, UPB Upstart, Leviton OmniPro Touch designer and other Windows only programs. I have tested HS4 running on Windows 2016 and it does well. Personally I like this over running Homeseer on Windows 10-11. I do have one W2016 server running Blue Iris...mostly to tinker with it. I have another one running Zoneminder which I still prefer over Blue Iris. Another one keeps the MythTV and Squeeze server running (don't use MythTV much these days).

                Last few Lenova's M93A's purchased for $65 with 8Gb of RAM and 500Gb SATA drives. These are all 5th generation Intel CPUs. Also purchased two more Tiny's with 6th Generation Intel CPUs (these have been upgraded to 32Gb) for around $100 each plus shipping.

                My Home office desktop here boots to Windows 11 or Ubuntu 24.04 these days. Mostly do video editing, photo scanning, sound stuff with it.
                - Pete

                Auto mator
                Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb
                Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro
                HS4 Lite - Ubuntu 20.04 / VB W7e Jetway JBC420U591
                Fanless Intel® Celeron N3160 SoC 8Gb
                HS4 Pro - V4.1.18.1 - Ubuntu 20.04/VB W7e 64 bit Intel Kaby Lake CPU - 32Gb
                HSTouch on Intel tabletop tablets

                X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation-Tasmota-Espurna. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Smartthings hub, Hubitat Hub, and Home Assistant

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                  #23
                  Win 7 Ultimate Shuttle XPC Fanless, Intel Celeron (R) @ 1.99 GHz, 8Gb ram, 128 mb SSD. Running HS4 & Blue Iris @ (8) cameras. CPU usage at 58-60%, Ram usage 34%. No issues so far!

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                    #24
                    That's similar to the Zotac C320 Nano I used to use for HS3 Pro. Like TC1, I'm a big fan of using a laptop for HS. My current system is a Lenovo W530 i7 with 32G Ram and 240G and 960G SSDs. The 960G is in the expansion slot that previously had the DVD drive in it.

                    Many company uses a lot of Supermicro products, but based on the OP saying he wanted to reduce power usage, I'm not sure a server running VMs is the best option.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Kemm, What's the power draw on your Lenovo? Was looking at those as a possible future unit. My Shuttle has been in service for about 5 years running my home automation and cameras. Had to do a little tweaking to get it to run 8 cameras thru BI.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally posted by kenm View Post
                        That's similar to the Zotac C320 Nano I used to use for HS3 Pro. Like TC1, I'm a big fan of using a laptop for HS. My current system is a Lenovo W530 i7 with 32G Ram and 240G and 960G SSDs. The 960G is in the expansion slot that previously had the DVD drive in it.

                        Many company uses a lot of Supermicro products, but based on the OP saying he wanted to reduce power usage, I'm not sure a server running VMs is the best option.
                        A laptop is a good choice for energy and redundant power supply. One does have to be careful of heat as most laptops aren’t made to run 24/7.

                        A server needn’t be too noisy or consume a lot of energy. My current Supermicro 1U using an E series Xeon 6 core processor, is quiet enough to run in a closet next to my wife’s home office without being intrusive and consumes about 45 watts. I was able to run HS on a 30-watt Atom server, but I was dissatisfied with the speed. It ran at about 60-70% CPU where the Xeon runs at about 15%. I also have run HS in a VM, but it is slower than a physical machine. For me speed is only an issue when I am configuring HS4. When it is operating in the background a VM or Atom processor does just fine.

                        As with most things, everyone’s use case and requirements are different.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by shennecke View Post
                          Kemm, What's the power draw on your Lenovo? Was looking at those as a possible future unit. My Shuttle has been in service for about 5 years running my home automation and cameras. Had to do a little tweaking to get it to run 8 cameras thru BI.
                          Averages at 39W with a Peak of 51W. Actually pretty close to randy's 1U.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by kenm View Post
                            "A PC that cannot be upgraded to Windows 11 will become a security/privacy risk in two years, when MS stops supporting Windows 10."

                            This is why I ran Windows 7 until I was forced to upgrade to 10 due to a hardware failure. I'll likely take the same approach for Windows 11 since the system I have now will not support 11.
                            I understand your desire to squeeze the most life out of hardware, just as long as we agree that the end of life for the hardware should be no later than the end of support for the operating system(s) it can run.

                            If you want to take the approach of "why do I need a Windows 11 PC just to run Homeseer?" then I'd argue that you might as well take that argument to its logical conclusion: run HS on bare-bones Linux, since you aren't using all of the desktop UI or productivity features in Windows. That's what I do, because I run HS on dedicated hardware. I look at my HS system as an appliance, not a general-purpose computer.

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