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    #16
    Not sure what kind of Smoke Alarms you have, but most have a latching indicator light so you can identify which unit is seat of the alert. I spend a LOT of time as a firefighter searching houses with various systems (both interconnected and independent) trying to find that elusive indicator light that is 'different'. While it is a pain, I have seen the very unfortunate results of no smoke detectors or independent ones that don't all go off together. 'nuff said

    As for the using a door/window sensor, i would not recommend it. Yes they have the inputs but they are a pain to hook to and seem unreliable. I tried it and decided that a dedicated input device is easier to install/wire, program and monitor. And it is about the same cost.

    And finally (grin) the Relay is 120V on the CONTROL side (the Smoke/CO Detector side) not the relay side. That side are just dry contacts which can utilize any voltage basically -- or feed directly in as dry contacts into the Zooz device...

    The only downside to this is that there is no way to determine Smoke vs CO alerts... but then again the whole idea is to get folks awake and moving and let the tell the alert via the sound the alarms are giving.... Homeseer is your SECONDARY alert mechanism, not the PRIMARY.

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      #17
      Ok folks - status update. I bought the relay and I bought the Zen17... wow... one of the easiest upgrades ever. I had one of the alarms that happened to be installed into a junction box in the ceiling -- and exposed in the attic. I was able to wire nut the input side of the relay (white/black/orange) right to the detector. And the other side (blue/brown) right into the Zen17 dry contact input. I then set the Zen17 into CO alarm mode and poof, it all works like a charm. Alarm goes off and lights come on.

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