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    arduino esp32c3/webserver/temp/humidity

    Ok I have been gone for a long time again... so much time that I cannot find...
    Anyway, I bought an arduino esp32c3 to play with. Wow is this thing small. Finger tip small.
    I did a flash an led tutorial, easy...

    Then I did a wifi web server, temp, humidity sensor and it worked easily.

    I searched the site before posting this and a lot of esp32 i found were about Bluetooth and door/window sensors so figured let me ask.

    Is there a plugin where you can pull in wifi arduino's to pull temp and humidity sensors? Thinking the possibilities are endless with motion detection, connect relays, lights on motion, etc so just seeing where others have thought of this.

    For me...
    I am thinking for $10 a temp/humidity sensor that could also do more seems nice.
    could 3d print a case for them too, to keep them small and velcro/glue to a dc walwart for power keeping it powered, small and out of the way.
    HW - i5 4570T @2.9ghz runs @11w | 8gb ram | 128gb ssd OS - Win10 x64

    HS - HS3 Pro Edition 3.0.0.435

    Plugins - BLRF 2.0.94.0 | Concord 4 3.1.13.10 | HSBuddy 3.9.605.5 | HSTouch Server 3.0.0.68 | RFXCOM 30.0.0.36 | X10 3.0.0.36 | Z-Wave 3.0.1.190

    Hardware - EdgePort/4 DB9 Serial | RFXCOM 433MHz USB Transceiver | Superbus 2000 for Concord 4 | TI103 X-10 Interface | WGL Designs W800 RF | Z-Net Z-Wave Interface

    #2
    I use a few Tasmota ESP devices for temperature and temperature humidity sensors. Just recently built a tiny combo Lightning sensor, light sensor and temperature sensor using one Wemos D1 running on batteries and solar charged.

    Tasmota is firmware that works with a variety of devices.

    The newest sensors are all using Wemos D1's (cheap and small). Newest are using ESP32's.

    I use wired contact sensors with one Wemos D1 and button and temperature sensor on one garage door opener. This one has worked fine now for a couple of years. Always liked it better than the MyQ opener that I used on another garage door opener.

    For wireless 433Mhz sensors using a Tasmota wireless hub (Sonoff Bridge) which also works well with outdoor wireless sensors (PIR's).

    Tasmota firmware for ESP32 is now including Matter (testing it now).

    Click image for larger version  Name:	1-wire-temperature.jpg Views:	0 Size:	46.8 KB ID:	1656486
    Here is the outside battery operated combo sensor.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	lightning.jpg Views:	0 Size:	52.6 KB ID:	1656487
    - Pete

    Auto mator
    Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb
    Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro
    HS4 Lite - Ubuntu 22.04 / Lenovo Tiny M900 / 32Gb Ram

    HS4 Pro - V4.1.18.1 - Ubuntu 22.04 / Lenova Tiny M900 / 32Gb Ram
    HSTouch on Intel tabletop tablets (Jogglers) - Asus AIO - Windows 11

    X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation-Tasmota-Espurna. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Alexa, Cheaper RFID, W800 and Home Assistant

    Comment


      #3
      I also use Tasmota on D1 Minis and communicate via MQTT. I have a few set up using the BME280 temperature, humidity, and pressure sensor as well as TSL2561 light sensors. Both of these sensors seem to be more accurate than the less expensive ones In some installations I also have other items on D1 Minis. For instance, one at my desk has an LD2410C mmwave occupancy sensor I use to control the light with. I use Tasmota for more than just sensors. I have a 6 zone irrigation control box using a larger board to control 6 irrigation valves which allows for automated control via MQTT and also local coontrol with momentary switches. The switches are back lit and light up when the corresponding valve is on. Long pressing any of them turns them all off. Tasmota can do many things for you.

      Note that for the ESP32-C3 you need to use the tasmota32c3- binaries. So not a standard installation. The D1 Minis, while a little larger, are less expensive and can be flashed with the web tool for most of your needs.‚Äč
      Karl S
      HS4Pro on Windows 10
      1070 Devices
      56 Z-Wave Nodes
      104 Events
      HSTouch Clients: 3 Android, 1 iOS
      Google Home: 3 Mini units, 1 Pair Audios, 2 Displays

      Comment


        #4
        I like that you have no soldering with the Wemos D1's. Its just a USB cable to your PC and you can use a web interface to upload firmware. The ESP32's are little computers now with programming scripting built in.

        The Sonoff THR316 is a bit more money than the Wemos D1. I am still getting used to it. Folks are purchasing the Sonoff THR316-D version with displays and turning them in to thermostats.

        Click image for larger version

Name:	matter.jpg
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        Attached Files
        - Pete

        Auto mator
        Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb
        Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro
        HS4 Lite - Ubuntu 22.04 / Lenovo Tiny M900 / 32Gb Ram

        HS4 Pro - V4.1.18.1 - Ubuntu 22.04 / Lenova Tiny M900 / 32Gb Ram
        HSTouch on Intel tabletop tablets (Jogglers) - Asus AIO - Windows 11

        X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation-Tasmota-Espurna. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Alexa, Cheaper RFID, W800 and Home Assistant

        Comment


          #5
          I also have several D1s in service using tasmota and MQTT. Pool pump relay control, decorative fountain valve, water meter pulse counter, etc.
          -Wade

          Comment


            #6
            I have a dozen or so ESP32C3 and ESP32S3 devices that I use to gather data that gets sent via MQTT into mcsMQTT plugin to HomeSeer. They are VERY reliable and easy to code for many sensors (Temperature, Humidity, Human Presence, Air Quality, Lux, Dryer Status to turn on Booster fan). Just picked up a batch of ESP32 C3 Super Mini off AliExpress for $2.05 each. I should point out I'm not using Tasmota, I'm using the Arduino IDE to program the devices.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jim@beersman.com View Post
              I have a dozen or so ESP32C3 and ESP32S3 devices that I use to gather data that gets sent via MQTT into mcsMQTT plugin to HomeSeer. They are VERY reliable and easy to code for many sensors (Temperature, Humidity, Human Presence, Air Quality, Lux, Dryer Status to turn on Booster fan). Just picked up a batch of ESP32 C3 Super Mini off AliExpress for $2.05 each. I should point out I'm not using Tasmota, I'm using the Arduino IDE to program the devices.
              what made you go this route vs Tasmota?
              I will have to check this out. I know nothing about Tadmota...
              HW - i5 4570T @2.9ghz runs @11w | 8gb ram | 128gb ssd OS - Win10 x64

              HS - HS3 Pro Edition 3.0.0.435

              Plugins - BLRF 2.0.94.0 | Concord 4 3.1.13.10 | HSBuddy 3.9.605.5 | HSTouch Server 3.0.0.68 | RFXCOM 30.0.0.36 | X10 3.0.0.36 | Z-Wave 3.0.1.190

              Hardware - EdgePort/4 DB9 Serial | RFXCOM 433MHz USB Transceiver | Superbus 2000 for Concord 4 | TI103 X-10 Interface | WGL Designs W800 RF | Z-Net Z-Wave Interface

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by TeleFragger View Post

                what made you go this route vs Tasmota?
                I will have to check this out. I know nothing about Tadmota...
                I have more control going the Arduino route. If a new sensor becomes available I don't have to wait for it to be added. Example Human Presence sensor.HLK-LD2410, they say it's supported if you do your own BUILD, but could never find what all was involved. With Arduino I just grabbed a library off github and away I went.

                Also I like things to work the way I want them to work. The zigbee human presence sensors flood the spectrum with messages. Building my own I designed it to only send presence when it changes, plus a general update message every 5 minutes.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I used the standard Tasmota build with an LD2410C sensor I'm testing in my office. mcsMQTT brings the data in by setting Tasmota to send serial data. This was one case where I was going to roll my own code until I saw this option. I set a Tasmota Rule on the device to limit how often it sends data.

                  Before finding Tasmota I had done the same as jim@beersman.com but now, if I can use the standard Tasmota build, I do. It's just faster to get something running and my tune is more valuable when doesn't with family and friends. I will write my own sketch if I have to do a custom build, though. When I did, it was not too difficult to modify a previous sketch.
                  Karl S
                  HS4Pro on Windows 10
                  1070 Devices
                  56 Z-Wave Nodes
                  104 Events
                  HSTouch Clients: 3 Android, 1 iOS
                  Google Home: 3 Mini units, 1 Pair Audios, 2 Displays

                  Comment

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