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    Isolated Wireless Network

    I am having a bunch of devices that can only work on the 2.4Ghz network. My TP-Link router seems to have some limit of around 32 or so devices that it accepts on the 2.4Ghz (or any other, I guess) radio/SSID. As a consequence, some devices can't get an IP address. The new lawn mower (Worx/Landroid) incl. the plugin I got is such a victim and I am planning to add a few more WiFi devices (not a big fan of them) to HS. How are you handling this? It's my understanding that I could add APs (so another radio/SSID) but I really don't need that for our relatively small home.

    Having said that, I do have a TP-Link AP that I put on a different subnet. Most of the stuff is on 192.168.1.xxx but everything camera related is on 192.168.2.xxx with no access to the internet. I now wonder if I should put all my other wireless "home automation" devices on that network. So the WiFi power outlets, half a dozen+ Chromecast devices, TVs (though most are wired), etc. But then how is this going to work when I try to access, cast, etc from cell phones, wall mounted tablets running HSTouch, etc? The phones and HSTouch are connected to our 192.168.1.xxx network and all those other devices are on the 192.168.2.xxx subnet. Maybe the wireless "internet router" will still connect the two networks so there is still a seamless communication within the private 192.168 network.

    #2
    All depends on your network.
    I use pfSense and have multiple networks for different things.
    Cameras go on it's own network, no internet access.
    IoT devices on it's own with internet access but no access to the other LANS.
    My main network has access to whatever I need it to.
    With Avahi and PimD I can access the IoT devices I need to, like Sonos for instance, and be able to control them from the main network.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by mulu View Post
      I am having a bunch of devices that can only work on the 2.4Ghz network. My TP-Link router seems to have some limit of around 32 or so devices that it accepts on the 2.4Ghz (or any other, I guess) radio/SSID. As a consequence, some devices can't get an IP address. The new lawn mower (Worx/Landroid) incl. the plugin I got is such a victim and I am planning to add a few more WiFi devices (not a big fan of them) to HS. How are you handling this? It's my understanding that I could add APs (so another radio/SSID) but I really don't need that for our relatively small home.
      It that a DHCP limit of 32 from TP link? Or will it only allow 32 wireless connections? If it is the former, you might be able to use more static addresses.
      HS3 Pro Edition 3.0.0.435 (Windows Server 8.1 on ESXi box)

      Plug-Ins Enabled:
      Z-Wave:,RaspberryIO:,AirplaySpeak:,Ecobee:,
      weatherXML:,JowiHue:,APCUPSD:,PHLocation:,Chromecast:,EasyTr igger:

      Comment


        #4
        I believe it is a limit of number of IPs assigned to a particular radio. So lets say a device like a Chromecast was assigned a specific IP (either static or with address reservation) and that device connects to the 2.4Ghz wireless network, then it will use up one of the 32 spots for that 2.4Ghz radio/SSID.

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          #5
          I believe that is a limit of your specific router. Using a different AP for all your wireless may get you over that limit. For instance, a Unifi Nano AP can handle 100 clients, up to 200 if the traffic is limited. So you could get an AP and use it for wireless and not use the router's wireless. This would keep you at 1 wireless network.
          Karl S
          HS4Pro on Windows 10
          1070 Devices
          56 Z-Wave Nodes
          104 Events
          HSTouch Clients: 3 Android, 1 iOS
          Google Home: 3 Mini units, 1 Pair Audios, 2 Displays

          Comment


            #6
            Here also use PFSense, multiple NICs (and VLANs). WAPs are Ruckus (3).You do want to keep it simple relating to maintenance.

            - Pete

            Auto mator
            Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU 16Gb
            Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.548 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro
            HS4 Lite - Ubuntu 22.04 / Lenovo Tiny M900 / 32Gb Ram

            HS4 Pro - V4.1.18.1 - Ubuntu 22.04 / Lenova Tiny M900 / 32Gb Ram
            HSTouch on Intel tabletop tablets (Jogglers) - Asus AIO - Windows 11

            X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation-Tasmota-Espurna. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Alexa, Cheaper RFID, W800 and Home Assistant

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Pete View Post
              Here also use PFSense, multiple NICs (and VLANs). WAPs are Ruckus (3).You do want to keep it simple relating to maintenance.
              Keeping it simple is key. I am running PiHole on a docker container to do some DNS filtering for the kids. If I ever dropped dead, I wonder how long things would just continue to run.

              HS3 Pro Edition 3.0.0.435 (Windows Server 8.1 on ESXi box)

              Plug-Ins Enabled:
              Z-Wave:,RaspberryIO:,AirplaySpeak:,Ecobee:,
              weatherXML:,JowiHue:,APCUPSD:,PHLocation:,Chromecast:,EasyTr igger:

              Comment

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