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    Consolidating Wall Warts

    Has anyone tried consolidating wall warts into one or two bigger wallw arts or maybe a power supply? I have 17 wall warts in my wiring closet. Many are the same output voltage. I was thinking about adding up the max requirements of each device and then purchasing a wall wart that could cover that load. I could then build a buss of some sort running down the back of the rack where I could plug in the different devices and then attach this "super wall wart" to the other end and plug that in with a noise filter on it.

    Has anyone tried to do something similar? Results?
    .

    #2
    I'm doing what your asking about using Altronix power supplies that have built in fused power distribution terminals and also provide battery backup. Works really well and keeps things neat. One supplies 24v DC for door locks & door strikes, and another supplies 12v DC for the Ocelot & SECU16 modules as well as PIR's and a number of other devices.

    Pictures of mine below... look for the Altonix units on Ebay:





    Another solution is to use the Elk Power Distribution Module to help you hook all that stuff up if you find your "super wall wart".

    http://www.automatedoutlet.com/produ...8&cat=0&page=4


    Cheers,
    Paul

    Click to visit: www.sbsmarthomes.com
    Santa Barbara Smarthomes

    Authorized Russound Dealer & Installer

    Personal HA Website

    HomeSeer User Profile

    Comment


      #3
      Sorta

      I realized that most of my accessories were either 12volt or 5volt and that there was an already existing source in my wiring closet, the HS pc. I found an old disk drive power splitter and checked all the polarities on the accessories. After adding up all loads and determining that it would probably not exceed the pc's power supply capacity I wired it to an accessories bus. An added advantage is the time that the accessories will run if you have the pc on an ups.

      list of items running off the pc power supply:
      IRXP2
      W800 RF
      CABLE MODEM (so power can be cycled when the modem goes offline)
      TimeCommander plus
      DLINK DI-604 router
      DLINK HUB

      I had to replace a power supply on another machine so I bought an extra 400 watter and slid it into the HS machine just to make sure the loads were more than covered. But I never had a problem before the switch I just figured more was better.

      Later, Terry

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        #4
        I bought one of Paul's Altronix units and use that with an Elk 12 volt power distribution panel. I have noticed that some 12 volt usages require more current than the Elk can supply. I just carefully checked polarity and used two channels of power to supply one device and it worked fine.

        Comment


          #5
          Wow!

          Wow! (again!) Those are some GREAT ideas. I was not thinking big enough! I looked through ebay and the prices for this stuff is a LOT less than I thought it would be.

          I think I am going to mix and match these ideas. For most of the transformers I'll use the Altronix gear, and for the few that attach to things that connect to the PC I'll use the PC! This will work out great!

          GREAT IDEAS! Thank you!

          Rob
          Last edited by outbackrob; June 12, 2005, 08:37 AM.
          .

          Comment


            #6
            Paul,

            Your pics of your equipment room are better then most commerical installs I've seen.

            Maybe I should take a few pics of the crap that I find around here.

            ANyways Nice job..

            Comment


              #7
              You might also consider this Leviton Universal Power supply - http://www.automatedoutlet.com/produ...cat=103&page=1
              Martin Custer

              Comment


                #8
                After looking at whta Paul had done I did some further research this weekend and purchased the following to clean up my wall wart problem.

                This is bascially a regulated PS from a LCD Monitor ($25)
                <LI>AC input: 100~240V, 1.5A, 50~60 Hz

                <LI>DC output: 12.0V ,5.0A Max (60W Max)

                <LI>Remote adapter : 110V - 220 V AC Input , 12V 5A Output

                <LI>
                <LI>Uses a standard AC Cord to plug into wall.

                I also added the Altronix PD8 Power Distribution module ($23 shipped) that takes a single input up to 28v and then outputs to 8 fused individual connections.
                By using the 5000ma supply I will be able to replace my 5 units that are currently plugged in and still have over 2000ma available for additional devices.

                The only thing that this solution does not provide is a rechargeable battery and after thinking about adding an Altronix unit to keep this running in the event of power outage I figured why, if the power goes down none of the devices wil work in the HA system anyway. My alarm already has backup battery.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by tman1
                  I realized that most of my accessories were either 12volt or 5volt and that there was an already existing source in my wiring closet, the HS pc. I found an old disk drive power splitter and checked all the polarities on the accessories. After adding up all loads and determining that it would probably not exceed the pc's power supply capacity I wired it to an accessories bus. An added advantage is the time that the accessories will run if you have the pc on an ups.


                  Later, Terry
                  Terry,
                  What is an accessories bus and where do I get one. I really like your idea of using a PC PS. Did it solve both the 12volt and 5volt? Does the PC PS supply both voltages?
                  James

                  Running HS 3 on Win10 .

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Another option

                    I bought 2 deep cycle 12v batteries and a charger for them. I connected them in parallel so I really have a double capacity supply. I connect everything that runs on 12v to it. I have a couple other PC's that have ham radio transmitters and they are also connected. This way I have a 12v source that works for MANY hours without any 120v power. I do have a UPS that is connected to the same 12v battery setup so it is not limited to the normally small capacity internal ones. Even the radio transmitters work without power for almost a week use.


                    The batteries are sealed and designed for indoor use so no problem in that area either. If the power outage lasts more than a few hours though, I start up the home generator system so everything else in the house works as well. The generator is a dual fuel system that runs on gas or propane. I still have it set to be manually started but may change that. Haven't decided yet.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Oops

                      That would would be me speak for a little box with a terminal strip that I could wire the individual accessories plugs into. The distribution box mentioned above would definately be the better way to go, I just went with what was available.

                      The molex disk drive connector in a pc has both 5 volts and 12 volts, I can double check the color code for you when I get to the house, but it is basically red (or yellow) and the black wire right next to it for 12 volts and then yellow (or red) and the black wire right next to it for 5 volts. I used the 5 volts to power the A/D inputs on my TimeCommander +.

                      Hope this helps, just make a chart of all your pinouts for your accessories and then mark the plugs. Some have the tips and rings reversed and if you reverse the wires you are gonna cause a short and the power supply will shut down. I actually didn't mark the plugs I made and got them switched around, plugged a positive tip to a component that required negative tip. When I went to start the computer it immediatly shut down, I traced out the problem, MARKED MY PLUGS, and the system or the component seemed to suffer no ill effects. But I would not reccomend my first method. I probably just got luckey.

                      Oh, and the local Radio Shack was very helpful in finding the right sub-mini plugs to use, they have a key that tells you which size plug is required. It required transporting the component to the Shack but was worth it for the smaller ones. Once I got a few of the sizes on hand I was able to tell them which I needed but for the firsts it was great.

                      Later, Tman1

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Got it!

                        Originally posted by tman1
                        That would would be me speak for a little box with a terminal strip that I could wire the individual accessories plugs into. The distribution box mentioned above would definately be the better way to go, I just went with what was available.

                        The molex disk drive connector in a pc has both 5 volts and 12 volts, I can double check the color code for you when I get to the house, but it is basically red (or yellow) and the black wire right next to it for 12 volts and then yellow (or red) and the black wire right next to it for 5 volts. I used the 5 volts to power the A/D inputs on my TimeCommander +.

                        Hope this helps, just make a chart of all your pinouts for your accessories and then mark the plugs. Some have the tips and rings reversed and if you reverse the wires you are gonna cause a short and the power supply will shut down. I actually didn't mark the plugs I made and got them switched around, plugged a positive tip to a component that required negative tip. When I went to start the computer it immediatly shut down, I traced out the problem, MARKED MY PLUGS, and the system or the component seemed to suffer no ill effects. But I would not reccomend my first method. I probably just got luckey.

                        Oh, and the local Radio Shack was very helpful in finding the right sub-mini plugs to use, they have a key that tells you which size plug is required. It required transporting the component to the Shack but was worth it for the smaller ones. Once I got a few of the sizes on hand I was able to tell them which I needed but for the firsts it was great.

                        Later, Tman1
                        I have a volt meter and so I can check the wires. Radio shack is where I was headed. Thanks for the Idea. I have an old PC that I was going to toss but now I have good use for it.
                        James

                        Running HS 3 on Win10 .

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I use the ELK-PD9 myself, and I am very happy with it. You can indeed combine multiple outputs, has auto resetting overload protection (so no fuses needed), the only thing I don't like is that Elk doesn't sell a power supply which can provide the max. current draw the Elk can support, unless you go for the 4A power supply,which is pretty expensive (but also supports battery backup). Here is a picture I took a few days ago, I have more stuff hooked up right now, but it should give you an idea of what it looks like:


                          click to enlarge
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