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    Keeping my receiver cool?

    Well the wife wanted me to move my whole house receiver to the cabinet under the TV rather than have it "showing". So now I have several problems not the least of which is keeping it cool. I checked the receiver last night in this very enclosed (36"WX30"DX20"H) area and the receiver was so hot it nearly burned me. So my question is, would a fan (type) connected to the power supply on the rear of the receiver in the back of the enclosure help. I guess I could "cut-out" the back and have it open but that would probably look tacky when the doors are opened. Any suggestions.
    -Rupp
    sigpic

    #2
    My receiver is inside my ugly entertainment center (next to the TV). I don't like entertainment centers in general, but it's a convenient way to hold stuff.

    Anyway, there is a glass door in front of it that pretty much closes everything up and would let it get pretty hot inside. But, I've completely cut away the back panel of the entertainment center behind the receiver. This was primarily to allow easy access to all the wiring (which is very, very messy). However, it also serves to allow air to circulate and keep the receiver relatively cool. Since the cutout is "exactly" the size of the receiver, you can barely even tell it's cut out through the glass door (or with the door open). Of course, there are a lot of wires there that are blocking some light.

    I also don't have anything directly on top of the receiver. There's a couple inches of airspace before a shelf holding other components.

    Comment


      #3
      Rupp,

      If it's getting that hot, you really need to do something. I think you need to either ventilate that space (cut holes) or more the receiver somewhere remote and run the wires back to that cabinet.
      Martin Custer

      Comment


        #4
        Rupp,

        I used to have my receiver in an enclosed entertainment center and it was getting too hot. The best way is to remove the back panel and allow air to get in through the back.

        You should also get a 120mm computer fan 12V and put it on top of the receiver blowing air into the receiver. Connect to an universal wall-wart so you can control the voltage to slow down the fan if necessary and this allows lower noise as well.

        You should also get a filter for the fan so you're not blowing dust into the receiver.

        I've seen SmartHome sells these crazy fan shelf that go for few hundred dollars. That's just crazy and I think having fan on top and opening up the back panel should help.

        Hope it helps,

        Simon

        Comment


          #5
          Fitting a fan to the top of the recieiver is a good idea, but I would have it sucking air out of the receiver. You may need more than one fan. On an old entertainment cabinet I had, I had one fan sucking air out of my Satellite tuner (which got very hot), another at the back near the bottom of the cabinet sucking air in and one at the top sucking air out. This arrangement worked well and kept everything cool. The only thing you have to watch out for is that the airflow coming in doesn't get sucked straight out again, instead of passing over your equipment first.
          For a more hi-tech solution you could go for a peltier heat pump device. These are often used in 12v Icebox systems and some cooling systems for computers.

          Comment


            #6
            Rupp, could you mount a 110V fan (or fans) on the back of the entertainment center (not the receiver) and plug it in to the switched outlet (if there is one) of the receiver. That way whenever the receiver is on the fan is on. Be careful when you buy a fan to get a quiet one! There are fans available that move a pretty good amount of air but are very quiet. You might not need to cut an opening for the air in-flow because I doubt the doors are airtight so even with them closed there should be enough air flowing around them to feed a small fan. Put the fan as high on the back of the entertainment center as you can so it will draw out the hottest air and create a cooling flow from the bottom to the top of the unit.

            Comment


              #7
              If your entertainment center is built like mine, you probably have a couple shelves inside that space that don't quite close off the vertical air movement. You can cut small holes in the bottom of the back where they aren't very noticable, and some at the top of the back, and you'll get normal convection airflow cooling provided the back of the unit isn;t too close to the wall. You can cut a small slot in the back (about an 1" high) just under each shelf, and then attach a small piece of right-angle metal or wood to the bottom back of the shelf, just in front of the slot you cut, to hide the slot.

              Add the fan(s) if you need to move more air without increasing the size of the vents (in and out). I would look into filtering the intake area if you use fans.

              Depending on the airflow through the receiver (look for the louvers or holes in the case for both in and out), you might be able to drill a series of holes in the shelf to allow more air to circulate up, around and hopefully through the receiver, or perhaps replace the shelf with a wire rack like they use in the closet systems.

              Stick a temp sensor on it to monitor your various attempts and use the best one!
              |
              | - Gordon

              "I'm a Man, but I can change, if I have to, I guess." - Man's Prayer, Possum Lodge, The Red Green Show
              HiddenGemStudio.com - MaineMusicians.org - CunninghamCreativeMaine.website

              Comment


                #8
                My 2 cents....

                If you're worried about the appearance if you cut out the back to gain air flow, do what I did. I went to Rat Shack and got some speaker grill cloth, cut it to size and stapled it to the top back of my entertainment center. Then draped it so the white wall didn't show behind the components as viewed through the glass door in the front. The cloth is light enough that you'll still get air flow.

                Chuck

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                  #9
                  Chas821,
                  That's exactly what I'm going to do. Thanks guys for all the ideas.
                  -Rupp
                  sigpic

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