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meteor or HomeSeer?

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    meteor or HomeSeer?

    My wife was up at 3 am feeding our 5 month old and saw a flash of light. Her first thought was HomeSeer / X10. Several minuted the booming started. She had never heard the automation system do that. It wasn't until I got home and told her about a meteor that was spotted over the Seattle this morning that she realized what she saw. "Well funny things are always happening around our house". I'm not sure what that says about my installation but my response was "nothing like that has happened for a long time..." A natural phenomena attributed to Home Automation, kind of funny.

    Meteor Story

    Jabran

    #2
    Wow!!!!! I wish I would have seen/heard that. I read about this earlier today and from the way your wife describes it that fireball probably dropped a meteorite within about 100 miles or so of where you live. What kind of meteorite is yet to be determined but since there are videos of it falling the people at UW (and especially the Hupe brothers) should be able to track it down to a pretty narrow region. The only exception to that would be if it dropped in the ocean in which case it'll almost definitely never be found.
    Pretty cool all the coverage its getting though and if a private individual finds it I'm sure it'll be worth a little bit with its "celebrity" status. I remember about a year ago a meteorite fell in Chicago and there was a mad rush of hunters/dealers there. Happy to say I got a nice little chunk along with part of the house it hit too!
    What do you expect from someone who goes by the name fireball?
    One last tip, just to make this somehow related to automation, if you want to increase your automation WAF all you have to do is become obsessed with meteorites and then your wife will welcome (sort of) your home automation hobby. On the flip side though, I can't talk about doing deals with NASA/Smithsonian/TCU/Bern Natural History Museum when it comes to this stuff like I can with my other hobby......

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      #3
      A long time ago someone gave my father (science teacher and rock collector) the below chunk and said it was a meteorite. Weighs about 14 ounces and is crystaline looking metal except for the melted end. Looks like it might also have a high velocity particle impact place on one corner.
      Attached Files
      Why I like my 2005 rio yellow Honda S2000 with the top down, and more!

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        #4
        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by jabrans:
        My wife was up at 3 am feeding our 5 month old and saw a flash of light. Her first thought was HomeSeer / X10.
        <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

        Cool, wish I could see something like that. It's funny how the wives like to point at X10/Homeseer when things happen. Our cable box decided to freeze up one night and left a frozen image on the TV screen. Guess what got blamed? I named the Homeseer PC "The Matrix" and that really freaks her out!

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          #5
          zoomkat,
          The rock in the picture doesn't look like any meteorite I've ever seen. The area on the right could maybe pass as a meteorite but the rest of it doesn't look anything at like a meteorite.
          When it passes through the atmosphere it gets burned pretty badly and the molten material kind of ablates away from the air blowing past it. When that happens it smoothes out any sharp edges pretty quickly. Granted, there are times when an iron meteorite will have sharp edges from a troilite nodule burning quicker than the surrounding material and its towards the very end of its cosmic velocity speeds (which produces the burning) so ablation doesn't have time to smooth things out but those are pretty large and don't quite look like what you've got there.
          Then again, this is just from looking at one picture. You should probably take it to an acredited research institution to have them check it out. If you know a little high school chemistry do a nickel test on it and if it comes back positive I'll trade you CM11A for it!
          An educated amatuer,
          Fireball
          BTW, did I mention that I founded a meteorite collecting association that was featured in a story in Sky & Telescope last year?

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            #6
            good friend of ours who lives on Whidbey Island says she was awakend by the Meteor because it was so loud.

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