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  • cable net and networking

    finally getting cable internet have searched and looked with too many answers.
    i have 3 computers 2-xp home 1-xp pro
    i know i need a router the cable goes into it and the computers plug into the router.
    Now which router is best to use and what about a firewall. i have the free Zonealarm on my computer and my son's hooked up to mine with a cross over cable ( only have dial-up now ) when he tries to connect to dial-up i have to shut down the zonealarm so he can. Will the cable internet and router act the same? or is the firewall in the router? sorry if this is a long question but i'm grafical and mechanical but still real new to this kinda stuff.
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    No, Im from Iowa. I only work in outer space. Captain Kirk

  • #2
    You'll need the cable modem, connected to a router, connected to all the computers. You can get routers with firewalls built in. I've got a Linksys BFSX41 that so far has worked nicely.
    My system is described in my profile.

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    • #3
      Fungun, welcome to the world of routers I personally use DLink stuf, router is a DI-624 wireless router with builtin firewall. Most routers now have a firewall builtin, but check before buying. Forget Zonealarm once you have it setup. You will still need to have an anti virus software on any pc conected to the router. If you want access to your X10 box from the internet you will need port forwarding, thats the area where most people have problems when setting up a router but once mastered is a piece of cake. If you have a friend that knows about routers they can remote into your router and set it up for you.... if you get stuck drop me a mail and I can do it for you.

      Cheers TrOjAn

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      • #4
        I too use a DLink but model DI 713P. They are very easy to configure and their tech support is outstanding. Lightning hit mine over a year out of warranty and they sent me a new one no questions asked.
        -Rupp
        sigpic

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        • #5
          cool thanx guys
          FB Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Capt-Tim/209398425902188

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          No, Im from Iowa. I only work in outer space. Captain Kirk

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          • #6
            Also if you do a Google search, it will show a lot of links and guides how to set your home network and how to set some routers. I personally do not have router (satellite connection ) but from reading all the different articles, everybody agrees that D-Links are easiest to configure.
            A Person is Smart. People are Dumb, Panicky Dangerous Animals.
            1,500 years ago, everybody knew that the Earth was the center of the universe.
            500 years ago, everybody knew that the Earth was flat.
            15 minutes ago, you knew that humans were alone on this planet.
            Imagine what youll know tomorrow.
            TLJ in MIB

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            • #7
              Plug all three computers into the router. Plug the router into the cable modem. Configure router appropriately (contact ISP for guidance). Make sure all three machines have seperate IP addresses and that none of them have the same one as the router. Firewall if you're paranoid because the router will keep all of your computers from being directly connected to the internet (read - not directly open to hackers unless they are extremely determined to get YOU).
              As for brands, I'm actually going to go against everyone's advice here and say stay away from D-Link if at all possible. I'm in IT for a living and the biggest part of my job is networking. Among the guys I work with (and some of my friends who do similiar work) there's a saying about any other type of networking equipment that's used when we're complaining about a certain brand, "Well, at least its not a D-Link." I've been very happy with Linksys routers and have been extremely impressed with a Netgear wireless router I got a couple of weeks ago because of all that you can do with it.
              Good luck!

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              • #8
                fireball?
                dont really understand your answer I thought if you have cable/dsl you had to have a firewall cause your hooked up 24/7.
                so the router is the firewall or there is a firewall in the router?
                FB Page - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Capt-Tim/209398425902188

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                No, Im from Iowa. I only work in outer space. Captain Kirk

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                • #9
                  fungun,
                  Nearly all, if not all, newer wireless routers/routers have built in firewalls now.
                  -Rupp
                  sigpic

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                  • #10
                    You need some sort of firewall software if the signal goes cable modem -> computer. If it goes cable modem -> router -> computer you're safe unless someone out there is just bound and determined to get into YOUR system.
                    I've been running like that for a few years now and have only gotten one virus and that's because someone exploited a hole in a webserver. That would have happened if I was running a firewall too.

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                    • #11
                      since this fellow is a LAN novice, he needs to go read, or have somehone here be more explicit. Get into whether his PCs use DHCP or static IP and the difference between the WAN port on the router, and all the basic rot.

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                      • #12
                        Fungun;

                        Bear in mind that residential routers are typically designed to prevent people from getting in to your machines but don't always have sufficient capabilities for preventing your machines from getting out. If you happen to have a user on one of your PC's who is inclined to open attachments without asking or things of that nature you may wish to keep ZoneAlarm in place. One of the most useful features of ZoneAlarm is that it makes you aware of when your machine makes an outgoing connection. It is possible for a hacker to obtain access to your machines if invited (much like a vampire by the machine. As I used to remind customers when installing security "It all depends on what you have that they want". If they have to put a huge amount of effort and risk to get in just for a VCR or TV their likely to go where the pickings are easier gained. We could all go nuts securing things but the real key is to prevent it from being worth their while to go after it.

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                        • #13
                          One thing you may need to look at is how many ports the router you are going to chose can foward. On my D-Link, (DI-614+), it has the capbility to only foward 20 ports in the virtual server setup. Other routers can foward a range of ports, which may be of use if you use a large number of server type applications in the future. I use zonealarm instead of a virus scanner (I use HouseCall when I suspect a problem) and it has detected the two viris/trojans that I've gotten (one an old virus associated with software on the MS site, and a trojan before I could get the MS patch for IE). A lot of people get virisus before the anti virius software gets updated.
                          Why I like my 2005 rio yellow Honda S2000 with the top down, and more!

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                          • #14
                            I think a combination of firewalls, and anti-virus solutions works best.

                            My cable modem hooks up to my wireless AP/router which has a built in firewall. I keep the ports closed unless they need to be opened to support things like the Homeseer web server, or my IP cameras.

                            Each of my PC's also has some kind of software based firewall running on them, as well as anti-virus software.

                            Because I use my notebooks else where in addition to home, and because of the email attachments that other folks mentioned, it's important to have something on the inside of your LAN as well as a firewall blocking stuff from the WAN side. That way if something slips through, or you or someone else brings it into your house, it still gets caught before it spreads to all of the machines.

                            Ed

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