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  • Networking 101 question

    In a wiring closet you connect your incoming cable to your cable modem, you connect your router to you modem and then you can connect PCs to the router. Can you simply take one of the router "out" cables and tie this into a punch down block and then connect more cables from this? My gut feeling is no and this is why they make switches and hubs.

    If not then how is a part like this used?
    -Rupp
    sigpic

  • #2
    No, you need some sort of a hub or a switch to distribute the ethernet signal. The item listed below actually is a hub, just not with RJ-45 connectors.

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    • #3
      Rupp,

      Poor naming on the item you mentioned by channel vision. It's not a true "hub" in the computer sense, just a wire termination point aka distribution module. You bring your wires from the various rooms into the enclosure, and terminate them into the 110 punchdown blocks on the module. The blue blocks underneath the punch downs are rj45 jacks. You run jumpers from the router/switch/modem/hub (pick one) to the blue jacks on the distribution module.
      My system is described in my profile.

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      • #4
        Hum ...,
        So why wouldn't I simply crimp RJ45 plugs and avoid buying the short jumpers and this piece?

        Also when crimping on the RJ45's which wiring standard should I use, T-568A or T-568B ?

        Is this (second one down) diagram correct?
        http://yoda.uvi.edu/InfoTech/rj45.htm
        -Rupp
        sigpic

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        • #5
          Rupp,
          You got it. That is the simplest way IMO.
          A is the same as B, only the green and orange wires are swapped. I do not think it really matters which one to use as long as you keep it consistent.
          A Person is Smart. People are Dumb, Panicky Dangerous Animals.
          1,500 years ago, everybody knew that the Earth was the center of the universe.
          500 years ago, everybody knew that the Earth was flat.
          15 minutes ago, you knew that humans were alone on this planet.
          Imagine what you’ll know tomorrow.
          TLJ in MIB

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          • #6
            Rupp,

            Here is a good link on how to make patch cables:

            http://www.lanshack.com/make-cat5E.asp

            There are some other good tutorials on this site as well.

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            • #7
              568B is the standard used for most Ethernet Cat5 installations.
              |
              | - Gordon

              "I'm a Man, but I can change, if I have to, I guess." - Man's Prayer, Possum Lodge, The Red Green Show
              http://HiddenGemTech.com - http://MaineMusiciansExchange.org - http://www.WJZF.org

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              • #8
                Everybody has their own preferred way, but I like using patch panels. I don't use one at home (an apartment with no permanent wiring), but I did set up the one at work. The module linked above will work like the patch panel I've set up (it was just much larger).

                Part of this is convenience and, I guess, part is laziness (even though the patch panel requires more work to set up).

                The patch panel will be permanently mounted somewhere and so the connections will not be susceptable to mechanical movement and potential damage. Most cat5 run for permanent installations is solid - it doesn't lend itself to being moved around very much. While this normally won't be a problem, you could find yourself rerunning wires at some point. Once the patch panel is stuck to the wall, the wires aren't going anywhere.

                Most patch cables are stranded wire and are easier to move around.

                I don't bother to make my own network cables any more. It's not difficult but it's a bit of a pain to make sure the wires are in the correct order. Also, you need to make sure that the plugs you use will work with the wire (stranded vs. solid). If they aren't made for the wire, you may not get good electrical and mechanical connections (some plugs are made for both types of wire).

                I just buy patch cables now. They are relatively cheap and my time is better spent on other projects. I only crimp them when I need a special cable (like the 1000 foot patch cable I just made to test RS485 communications). You can get cheap cables in all sorts of lengths and colors from many places (my last order was with www.cyberguys.com).

                People may argue that every jack and extra connection will create signal loss, etc. I think that in the end the convenience and clean installation of a patch panel are worth it. And signal loss issues shouldn't be a problem in a normal home environment.

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                • #9
                  <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Hum ...,
                  So why wouldn't I simply crimp RJ45 plugs and avoid buying the short jumpers and this piece?
                  <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                  You could, but the comments about moving cat5 apply. Also, remember that the structured wiring panels are made for Joe Smoe homeowner, who DOESN"T have the capability of making cat5 plugs.

                  <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Also when crimping on the RJ45's which wiring standard should I use, T-568A or T-568B ?
                  <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                  It doesn't make a difference, as long as you are consistant throughout the system. As Gordon mentions, most (ALL!) commercial LAN setups use 568B. That said, most of the residential structured wiring panels recommend 568A.

                  And NO, don't ask my why they do it that way. Short answer is history, inertia, and pride/stupidity.
                  My system is described in my profile.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Guys,
                    The only reason I need to create a cable is to temporarily get lan access to my weather sever which I have moved to my wiring closet. Once I get the router moved then a patch cable will suffice. Thanks for all the help and confusion I think I'll just look at a working cable and copy that. I have the crimp tool already from an older project. Thanks again.
                    -Rupp
                    sigpic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just as a side point, if you ever need any kind of cables....

                      Buy here........

                      http://store.pchcables.com/index.html


                      I have bought 100's for my business and you cannot go wrong.

                      Just as an example, check out there prices on network cables...

                      http://store.pchcables.com/camobo35neca.html

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