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  • Bestgear
    replied
    Originally posted by Bestgear View Post
    Its not a finished design by any means but it works. I just need to build another few!

    David
    Guys

    Thought I would update the thread. My use of a spare HE307 has been great - ended up with two 555's providing a 5 second "burst" of ON and OFF from the HE switch when the ignition is truned on or off, so via RFXCOM all is working really well. The circuit could have been a bit simpler (if possible with 555 - should have used a 556 I guess!) but electronic design is not my day job

    I have built three of these now, and still use the CR2032 in the transmitters I really did not want any hassles with ID changes when power is lost or interrupted. The battery has lasted fine so far.... I really should move it over to being vehicle powered too.

    Installation is dead easy, with just two wires - ground and switched live with ignition... nothing else

    Given the low cost of the HE307s I think its a great and reliable way of detecting the vehicles in the drive, and of course announcing their arrival....

    David
    Last edited by Bestgear; January 21, 2010, 07:23 PM.

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  • Bestgear
    replied
    Guys - I just thought I would chip in with my thoughts....

    I like the x10 ideal ala Gogs, but wanted to go RF. I like bluetooth, but since moving HS into a VM (issues with USB lan sharers with my BT dongles) plus, the inevitable drain on the phone battery to enable BT have moved away from that idea too....so.....

    I have several spare HE307 wall switches, supported by RFXCOM.

    So I made up a wee circuit (well, two actually) so that the two switches on the wall switch (on and off) are now "controlled" by the iginion switch.

    The first circuit now "presses" the on button when the car is started for 5 seconds.

    The second circuit "presses" the off button when the car ignition is switched off, again, for 5 secs or so.

    So, when you leave home, RFXCOM hears the ON, and when the car goes , never hears a corresponding OFF until it returns to the drive and is parked up.

    In HS, I have a simple device with the ON state being car away, and OFF being car parked.

    The HE307 is mounted in another small box with the circuits above, and is noce and neat. Its not a finished design by any means but it works. I just need to build another few!

    David

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  • rmasonjr
    replied
    One thing that looks interesting are the XBee transmitter/receivers. From what I've read, it's essentially wireless RS-232. That opens up possibilities of moving devices like this to wireless with little effort.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wadenut
    replied
    Originally posted by rmasonjr View Post
    True - mounting mine on the ceiling of the garage was the best move I made. I just ran ~50ft of cat5 back to the serial port and used an external power supply plugged into the garage door outlet in the ceiling.
    Unfortunately for me, running any cables out to the garage isn't going to be an option. Despite my request to have a pull put into the buried conduit running power out there, it didn't get done. I wasn't here when the electrician ran the wiring. He's got two 90's underground so I can't get a fish tape through either.
    I just bought a Linksys router on eBay which I'll upgrade with WRT or Tomato and use as a WLAN/LAN bridge. Should do the trick.

    I just a short time ago put the tag in the trunk of the car with the antenna running along the top of the back seat. It's looking encouraging.

    Leave a comment:


  • someguysname
    replied
    Originally posted by heatvent View Post
    How exactly are you using the slug? Do you connect a bt dongle? How does HS know that it has detected something?
    Yes, I have a bluetooth dongle in the disk 1 position and I load the bluez packages on the slug. I have a script that runs on the slug over and over constantly polling for BT devices. I have a bluetooth GPS receiver in my jeep and a bluetooth headset in the wifes car mounted in a hobby box from Radioshack along with the insides of a car charger. I have a 12 volt plug on the end of the wire coming out of the box that can plug into the cigarette lighter.

    Basicly what happens is the slug polls for the name of my bluetoth devices using hcitool name MAC ADDRESS and I pipe it to a file. Then I check to see if the file is empty or not...empty means it wasnt found, something in it means the device is around. If it's not empty I then drop a file on the HS server using smbclient. HS looks every minute to see if there are any files in the drop folder and updates the status accordingly.

    The neat thing about using the linux hcitools is that it can tell if ANY bluetooth device is around, even my iPhone....

    Leave a comment:


  • stevea
    replied
    Originally posted by rmasonjr View Post
    True - mounting mine on the ceiling of the garage was the best move I made. I just ran ~50ft of cat5 back to the serial port and used an external power supply plugged into the garage door outlet in the ceiling.
    Or:

    I modified the receiver enclosure and mounted an F-Connector on the end, ran TV cable from the receiver (which stayed by my HS machine in the basement) the 100 feet out to the garage, and connected it to a 1/4-wave "cross" antenna mounted on the ceiling of the garage. I also put a Radio Shack RF amplifier (one that plugs right into the TV-cable) in line. With this set up the 40M transmitters (with no external antenna, just the one coiled up inside the box) gives me close to a quarter mile range in some instances. When my wife is coming home, the garage door is fully open by the time she can even see the house.

    Steve

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  • rmasonjr
    replied
    True - mounting mine on the ceiling of the garage was the best move I made. I just ran ~50ft of cat5 back to the serial port and used an external power supply plugged into the garage door outlet in the ceiling.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wadenut
    replied
    Just had a thought. I could just get a second receiver and set it up in the garage. Receiver --> Quatech SDS --> Linksys WLAN bridge --> router --> LAN --> PC. I knew all this stuff I bought would come in handy eventually.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wadenut
    replied
    A big priority is to keep the tag out of sight. Above the windshield ('07 Nissan Altima BTW) would be my first choice as there's a map light there I could use to supply power to the tag. Routing the antenna seems to be the issue there. Hanging straight down as a test, which I thought would allow it to radiate out the window, didn't work. The only other option at that location is going to be to tuck it up under the windshield which will orient the antenna at 90 degrees to the receiving antenna when the car is parked in the garage, minimizing coverage.

    Leave a comment:


  • RAM
    replied
    Originally posted by Wadenut View Post
    Looking for suggestions. Where would be the best place to position a 40M tag in a car? I've tried the sunglasses compartment above the windshield with no luck. If I just set the tag on the roof of the car in the garage (no I'm not about to glue it there) it works fine. Somewhere near a 12V supply would be ideal.
    I have one under the dash in my car ('98 dodge stratus) and one in the ceiling console in our van ('05 Chrysler T&C) and both (40M versions) work at least 100 ft from the receiver.

    Leave a comment:


  • rmasonjr
    replied
    In my truck, I have it double-stick-taped behind the rearview mirror. In my wife's SUV, it's mounted on the dash in the corner on the passenger side. The third vehicle just has it tucked in the map compartment in the door.

    Leave a comment:


  • nightwalker
    replied
    Originally posted by Wadenut View Post
    Looking for suggestions. Where would be the best place to position a 40M tag in a car? I've tried the sunglasses compartment above the windshield with no luck. If I just set the tag on the roof of the car in the garage (no I'm not about to glue it there) it works fine. Somewhere near a 12V supply would be ideal.
    In our cars I have one on the dashboard, sort of behind the inspection stickers, another on the rear shelf, sitting behind the 3rd stoplight housing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wadenut
    replied
    Looking for suggestions. Where would be the best place to position a 40M tag in a car? I've tried the sunglasses compartment above the windshield with no luck. If I just set the tag on the roof of the car in the garage (no I'm not about to glue it there) it works fine. Somewhere near a 12V supply would be ideal.

    Leave a comment:


  • heatvent
    replied
    Originally posted by Rupp View Post
    No, I'm (or was) using the CR2032's in my 40M transmitter. I have since switched it over to AA's and they last forever. My smaller 8M devices batteries last a lot longer.
    Steve, I would expect it's the 40M vs 8M power drain since your 40M devices are hard wired.

    Rupp, how do you have the AA's connected? Do you have 4 AA's wired to the 6V unregulated post on the 40M transmitter? I know there is another thread where someone said they tried a 9v on the regulated post and got really poor results (2 weeks).

    I have been contemplating my RFID purchase and I keep bouncing back and forth between the one with the cr2032 batteries and the 12v version, although a good battery pack setup would certainly persuade me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rupp
    replied
    Originally posted by rmasonjr View Post
    Yeah, the CR2032 batteries last a long time. The only exception is in cold weather. When my truck is parked outside the garage in cold weather, I get a few more dropouts than usual.

    Rupp - are you sure you're not using CR2025s instead of CR2032s?
    No, I'm (or was) using the CR2032's in my 40M transmitter. I have since switched it over to AA's and they last forever. My smaller 8M devices batteries last a lot longer.

    Leave a comment:

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