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    #16
    Originally posted by Wadenut View Post
    You've got to be careful. If there happens to be any appreciable voltage on the ungrounded coax sheath, you might be in for a nasty shock.
    Actually when i was removing some of the unused coax i did get a few minor tingles, very low voltage (i have a good internal voltage gauge, having received shocks from 12V all the way up to 50,000V - Given low current) which fits with you earth comment. In terms of grounding, i could be totally wrong but on my last few visits to the roof, i didn't note any grounding for the TV aerial, i think in terms of Australian code it is actually optional, and to that extent at any aerial i have seen it is quite uncommon to ground it, (could be wrong, but i know in my case, it is not grounded, as the only cable that runs down from the roof is the coax).

    In terms of the actual amp, it is one of the amplified boxes, that actually has the amplifier (power injector) at a seperate part of the circuit, so in this case the amplifier part is very close to the distribution hub, with the system going:


    Aerial
    |
    Splitter ----> Bathroom TV
    |
    (UHF / VHF etc Input of amplifier)
    |
    Kingray style amplifer
    |
    (Output of amplifier)
    |
    Splitter ---- > Power Injector (to power above amplifier)
    |
    Distribution Hub --> to three connected TV's
    HS3 PRO, Win10, WeatherXML, HSTouch, Pushover, UltraGCIR, Heaps of Jon00 Plugins, Just sold and about to move so very slim system.

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      #17
      Here I got a bit paranoid relating to the whole grounding thing after a lightning bolt took out my Rain8nets. I was lucky cuz the lightning took out LCD TVs and kitchen appliances, alarm panel etc next door. Just an environment for lightning in the air can cause some issues. Goofing around (very dangerous) setting up an aerial once; before grounding and before a storm saw sparks more than 12" to a nearby electrical outlet once. Very interesting little light show.

      I do have multiple earth grounds connected to my electrical panel and other stuff (like the aerial cables). The base though was that the electrical panel is grounded to a water pipe and multiple earth stakes.

      My OTA TV antenna is mounted in the attic. I do have an in house video set up which is a carry over from many years ago. Today its a mixture of broadcase HD and SD on the LCD TV's. I did have power injectors in place for IR repeating and have removed them.

      So here I have:

      Aerial ==> amplifier (20 feet or so from aerial in attic / powered 120VAC)
      ==> combo channel injectors (basement - all grounded) ==> distribution amp with terminators on ends not used ==> TV's that use OTA/in house stuff.

      It was a hodgepodge though of OTA, Cable and satellite feeds. (even using a Nexus-S card in a PC a while ago).

      Many years ago the quick and easy way to "hear" harmonics was to utilize an AM transistor radio tuned between radio stations. I used to use this for my automobiles.
      - Pete

      Auto mator
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        #18
        Originally posted by travisdh View Post
        Actually when i was removing some of the unused coax i did get a few minor tingles, very low voltage (i have a good internal voltage gauge, having received shocks from 12V all the way up to 50,000V - Given low current) which fits with you earth comment. In terms of grounding, i could be totally wrong but on my last few visits to the roof, i didn't note any grounding for the TV aerial, i think in terms of Australian code it is actually optional, and to that extent at any aerial i have seen it is quite uncommon to ground it, (could be wrong, but i know in my case, it is not grounded, as the only cable that runs down from the roof is the coax).

        In terms of the actual amp, it is one of the amplified boxes, that actually has the amplifier (power injector) at a seperate part of the circuit, so in this case the amplifier part is very close to the distribution hub, with the system going:


        Aerial
        |
        Splitter ----> Bathroom TV
        |
        (UHF / VHF etc Input of amplifier)
        |
        Kingray style amplifer
        |
        (Output of amplifier)
        |
        Splitter ---- > Power Injector (to power above amplifier)
        |
        Distribution Hub --> to three connected TV's
        Ouch!
        From what Pete mentioned, you can see why grounds (earths) are important. A lightning strike or near miss could take out all your equipment at the very least, and at worst, well... blow your roof off. It's hard to believe until you've seen the result of a direct strike.
        Aside from that, grounding the coax at some point will not only help improve things, it'll aford some protection.

        Yes, splitting the unamplified signal is resulting in amplifying 50% of the original, which is fine if there's a strong signal in the first place. Moving the amp to before the splitter will help on both branches.
        Real courage is not securing your Wi-Fi network.

        Comment


          #19
          The topic of grounding; surge protection (yes a bit of a tangent) became a very long thread here:

          http://cocoontech.com/forums/topic/1...rge-protector/

          Personally I had gotten a great deal on a commercial Eaton surge protector and went really slow (baby steps) installing it. That said the surge protector had no holes on it to feed the power out of it. I didn't think of using a hole punch but rather just busted a couple of drill bits drilling a 3/4" hole into the case to connect it on the side of my fuse panel. The specific Eaton I purchased has connections to the HAI OPII panel and optional intelligent displays built in. (way overkill for a residential installation but it has a 20 year free replacement warranty).

          http://www.sinewavetechnologies.biz/...PT160-SPEC.pdf

          BTW the whole TV thing (here in my home) is migrating from the aerial RG6 connection to the TV to one head end box with multiple tuners/multiple clients connected now via network for live streaming and channel changing; easier to deal with than multiple RF connections. (similiar in fact to the Sage TV thing).
          Last edited by Pete; August 26, 2012, 01:31 PM.
          - Pete

          Auto mator
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          X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation-Tasmota-Espurna. OmniPro 2, Russound zoned audio, Smartthings hub, Hubitat Hub, and Home Assistant

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by travisdh View Post
            I got in the roof, and tried the simple fix (moving the cables upwards slightly), they do cross some electrical cables but not as many as i was thinking, given it is 10:50pm here so i didn't look that well.

            What did surprise me was that we got a TV put in the bathroom a few months ago (not the surprise), anyways when i was tracing the aerial cable from the roof, and it appears like the installer had split the TV aerial before it goes into the signal amplifier in my structured wiring closet (i.e. all cables run into there), anyway that surprised me that one line goes off to the TV in the bathroom, and the other goes to the amplifier.

            The signal amplifier does not actually have a ground from what i can see, it runs the coax into the signal amplifier and distribution hub, then runs out to each room, but at no point (unless in the actual devices) is there a ground, the TV signal amplifier has one of those plug in connections driven from a power pack.

            Anyways, i figure looking at shortening the aerial might have some affect, that is removing the split and returning the aerial to just the signal amplifier.

            In terms of the ground comment, is it worth looking at grounding say the distribution box, to see if that gets rid of some of the interference? Is it just a case of taking the outer sheeth of one of the coax cables and tieing it into a ground point somewhere, since most devices now days are double insulated and have no ground?
            It appears your installer didn't have a clue on proper coax installation. "Splitting" the coax from the antenna to the amplifier causes a major mismatch in the antenna cable. Antenna coax mismatch can cause a "stub trap effect" which could effectively short out your digital TV signals across a relatively wide frequency.

            If you can access your coax system and remove that split, test your X10 system again for interference. If your TV interference disappears, you have found the cause.

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