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Aeon Multisensor 6 in-wall/in-ceiling mount

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  • MrMxyzptlk
    replied
    I had my builder install outlets in the attic, above each room.
    I also had my low voltage guy run cat 6 to each of the same locations.
    Now I can connect just about any home automation device up in the ceiling without worry.

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  • reidfo
    replied
    Originally posted by etobian View Post
    Well... you need a power outlet to plug the usb hub. I think outlets in an attic are allowed, but they are not allowed if they are hidden in the ceiling behind drywall.
    In the US everywhere I've seen outlets in the attic are no problem with regards to code compliance. My builder installed one as standard practice next to a light and switch. I will probably install a few more outlets up there (code compliant) so that I don't have long AC cords running up there.

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  • randy
    replied
    In my house I have a single 12-volt power supply in the basement. I distribute the 12-volts throughout the house. It powers LED illuminators for CCTV, PWM for LED strips and where I need 5-volts for a few multi-sensors I use DC-DC converters. Everything from the basement to the attic, indoors and out is powered by the one supply, except Arduinos which are powered by POE from the network switch. Even the attic lighting is LED, so I don't need any house current outlets or lights up there.

    The 12-volt supply is current limited at 10 amps, but there are a few 5-amp PTCs on the runs for good measure. With everything connected and the LED strips at full brightness it runs as much as 7 amps. The attic lighting is about 3.5 amps. Nominally the power supply runs at about 2-3 amps.

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  • etobian
    replied
    Originally posted by mikedr View Post
    Note that electrical code isn't an issue, because this is low voltage wiring.
    Well... you need a power outlet to plug the usb hub. I think outlets in an attic are allowed, but they are not allowed if they are hidden in the ceiling behind drywall.

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  • mikedr
    replied
    Note that electrical code isn't an issue, because this is low voltage wiring.

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  • TechHA
    replied
    Originally posted by etobian View Post
    I'm curious how did you wire USB in the ceiling. Where is your power outlet? Where is your USB power adapter?
    I simply put a 6 port powered USB hub in my attic and ran 15 to 25 ft USB cables to each sensor.

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  • etobian
    replied
    Originally posted by TechHA View Post
    All are USB powered too, no more batteries! I have these in every room and we hardly ever touch a light switch.
    I'm curious how did you wire USB in the ceiling. Where is your power outlet? Where is your USB power adapter?

    I've been thinking for a way to do this and stay within the electrical code.

    Leave a comment:


  • waynehead99
    replied
    Aeon Multisensor 6 in-wall mount

    My method is not scientific but I have put them next to different brand humidity sensors as well as using the humidity sensor on my heater and they all seem to read the same within a percent or two. Humidity is one thing in a sealed house I would think shouldnt change too much from room to room (except bathroom showers) and I am seeing the same. I have 6 of these in different locations in the house and they all are close to each other.

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  • mikedr
    replied
    How accurate are these puppies from humidity anyway?

    I've found that inexpensive humidity sensors can vary wildly in accuracy. I had a bunch of identical humidity/temperature sensors (not z-wave -- a type with a display), and the temperatures when they were located together on a table were basically within a degree, but humidity could vary as much as 10%.

    Leave a comment:


  • Automated
    replied
    The power draw is so small, you could probably power them through a long piece of security sensor cable without too much voltage drop. The problem with this approach is that you may get induced voltage spikes from time to time from lightning storms, which may or may not harm the sensor. It could just cause them to need a reset, it could fry their regulator, or it might not do anything. Part of this also depends on how they designed the circuit. Unfortunately, the trend in consumer electronics is to omit the few basic components that protect devices in these cases to save a few pennies per unit.

    For ceiling mounted motion sensors, I have been pretty happy with the Visonic Spy series, but these are hard wired via my alarm panel, so a total different animal.

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  • waynehead99
    replied
    I have about 12 of these sensors and noticed in my rooms with vaulted ceilings, they report the temp way off by about 4 degrees, but humidity is always accurate. Those rooms I don't use them for anything other than motion really. I would think that them in the ceiling exposed to the attic would cause some differences too. I do like how clean it looks, but also not sure about having to patch the hole perfect enough when I decide to take them when selling the house.

    I have really wanted to find a nice flat motion sensor for ceiling mount, but would like battery powered and haven't found anything yet.

    I have a couple of these hard wired into the attic. Was able to run an outlet to the general area to plug them into. But my main floor there is no easy way of doing it.

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  • Automated
    replied
    I am curious how accurate and quicjly updating the humidity sensor is as I do not see any holes where air can pass through.

    Also, how do they address the power connection when flush mounted? If installed in wall or in ceiling, it should be powered through a proper code compliant in wall cable. I would then imagine there should be a terminal to USB adapter or pigtail to connect the cable. This way regular home security or category cable used by the industry could be used. The kit should come with the adapter, but does it?

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  • TechHA
    replied
    Range of motion is sooo much better with them mounted on the ceiling. All are USB powered too, no more batteries! I have these in every room and we hardly ever touch a light switch.

    As for the other sensors, I find the temp/humidity work just fine being up high like that with standard 8 ft ceilings. The readings are 0 to 1.5 degrees off from my 1-wire devices. Most are only about .4 difference. In a home setting, this is just fine in my opinion.

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  • mikedr
    replied
    Originally posted by TechHA View Post
    I've had these for a couple weeks now. Love them!
    Awesome -- looks very slick!

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  • waynehead99
    replied
    How is the range on the motion with them mounted on the ceiling? I have thought of doing this if it's good.

    Leave a comment:

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