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    New house with no thermostat wiring

    Just moved into our new home and I've discovered that we have wireless thermostats and that the contractor didn't run any thermostat wiring through the house. What's wrong with people ?

    I want Zwave therms like I had on the old house. Anyone know how I can accomplish this?

    #2
    Originally posted by prsmith777 View Post
    Just moved into our new home and I've discovered that we have wireless thermostats and that the contractor didn't run any thermostat wiring through the house. What's wrong with people ?

    I want Zwave therms like I had on the old house. Anyone know how I can accomplish this?
    Unless you are prepared to run wires, I don't see any solution for local control. At least with the zwave tstat you can wire it up at the furnace, but only control it from zwave/HS3.
    Mike

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      #3
      Here are your options:

      (1) Run thermostat wiring, of course.

      (2) Even if the thermostat is wireless, I highly doubt that the furnace/HVAC itself is receiving the wireless signals. More than likely what it is occurring is that there is a wireless receiver connected to the standard wires on the furnace/HVAC.

      Therefore, you can get a Z-Wave thermostat, and install at the location of the furnace/HVAC -- i.e., replace the wireless receiver with a thermostat.

      Now, the problem is that this will likely be located in a closet, a garage, an attic, or a basement, and you don't want the thermostat to be turning on/off AC and heat based on the temperature there. Therefore, you need a remote temperature sensor, and configure the thermostat to ignore the local temperature and instead just use the remote temperature sensor.

      I believe RCS's Z-Wave thermostat provides for remote temperature sensors (Honeywell's might too). Unfortunately, the remote temperature sensors are themselves wired, but it may be easier to run a wire to a suitable location for temperature monitoring than running wire to where your current thermostat is located.

      Then where the current thermostat is located you can get an old iPhone and run HSTouch as your thermostat display. HSTouch has a super nice thermostat screen, so you wouldn't even need to do design anything with the Designer. You would need to run power to the iPhone, but that should be trivial -- just locate the iPhone in an in-wall mount in a stud space above an outlet.

      (3) Thermostats are essentially just relays. When they want to call heat, they activate one relay, and when they want to call AC, they active another. So, in theory, you could get a few MimoLites or Fibaro relays, etc., and "build" a thermostat using events, and then have local control via HSTouch (although you would have to build something in Designer since you're not using a "real" thermostat). Your temperature sensor could be any kind of multi-sensor -- Aeotec, HS's HSM200, etc.

      This option would not require running any wires. However, I don't like it. Thermostats generally have built-in protection so that you're not calling heat or air too quickly, so if your events aren't perfect, you could potentially ruin your HVAC equipment. And of course, if HS goes down, so does your ability to heat and cool your house.

      But that said, the events should be too hard to do. You could have a virtual device for mode as OFF/HEAT/COOL. Another virtual device for the fan as AUTO/ON. And two more for heat and cool set points. For heat, if the current temperature < heat set point - .2 F (and mode is HEAT), say, then turn on the heat, and if current temperature > heat set point +.2 F (and mode is HEAT), turn off heat. Same with cool. And fan would be as simple as if fan VD changes and becomes auto, turn off fan relay (the HVAC system automatically turns on the fan when heat or cool is called), and if it changes and becomes on, turn on fan relay.

      I'm assuming that this is a forced air furnace with or without AC, or a heat pump. Single stage. If you have two stages, the events would be more tricky. Generally, the second stage is called if heat (or AC) has been called, and has been running "X" number of minutes -- the assumption is that it's having a hard time getting the temperature to where it should be, so then you call the second stage. Both the second and first stages are turned off when the desired temp is reached.

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