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    Water Softener Bypass

    While inelegant, I attached a door sensor to the bypass valve on our Kinetico water softener (It's in the utility room, out of sight.) The plumbing in our place was apparently done by the Three Stooges. When we water outside, we set the water softener to bypass, leaving the rest of the house on unsoftened water. Sometimes we forget it's set to bypass. Using this, I've set events so that if lights or fans turn on near sinks, in baths, etc., the nearest Alexa device will announce that the softener is on bypass. There's also a reminder announcement on the half hour when it's on bypass. It's working well so far. Click image for larger version

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    #2
    Nice solution.
    -Wade

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      #3
      Why not just re-plumb the supply line for your outside water to connect ahead of the water softener inlet valve?

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        #4
        Originally posted by TC1 View Post
        Why not just re-plumb the supply line for your outside water to connect ahead of the water softener inlet valve?
        In this part of the country hose bibs on the outside of the house are typically tied into the house plumbing in/under the house, piped from the nearest branch. Couple this with slab on grade being the most common construction and piping frequently being under the slab, separating outside water isn't trivial. Even if in a crawl space or basement, it may involve running new pipes to several locations around the perimeter of the house.
        -Wade

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          #5
          Originally posted by Wade View Post

          In this part of the country hose bibs on the outside of the house are typically tied into the house plumbing in/under the house, piped from the nearest branch. Couple this with slab on grade being the most common construction and piping frequently being under the slab, separating outside water isn't trivial. Even if in a crawl space or basement, it may involve running new pipes to several locations around the perimeter of the house.
          Yep, I totally get that about Texas (I have friends there who had issues during the last power outage and busted pipes), but the OP appears to be from Minnesota where basement construction is fairly common.

          The fact I live in a almost 100 year old house that was never designed for all year living (beach community bungalow) I totally get rigging stuff up to compensate for house short-comings. But from my experience the greatest stress reliever has come from saying let's spend the money to redo something correctly.

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            #6
            To be honest, the plumbing should be completely redone between the supply and the upper level. It's a mess, I'm probably the 10th owner in a 40 year old house, and it was in foreclosure at least once. Lots of "fixes" were done. If I were going to be here another 10 years, I'd have it done. It does require getting into the ceiling. Plus, we are at the lower end of the recommended water pressure for the softener. Bypassing ahead of the softener might not let the softener regenerate well, at least according to the installer. I'm happy with this sensor for now.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Kevb View Post
              To be honest, the plumbing should be completely redone between the supply and the upper level. It's a mess, I'm probably the 10th owner in a 40 year old house, and it was in foreclosure at least once. Lots of "fixes" were done. If I were going to be here another 10 years, I'd have it done. It does require getting into the ceiling. Plus, we are at the lower end of the recommended water pressure for the softener. Bypassing ahead of the softener might not let the softener regenerate well, at least according to the installer. I'm happy with this sensor for now.
              Yep, totally understandable. Everyone's use-case and situation is different. Now that I'm getting ready for retirement in the next few years I no longer want to keep "fixing" all the previous mistakes and omissions. I'm basically just keeping the current house in good condition until I can finally build something brand new and not have to pay for the mistakes of previous owners.

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                #8
                Inelegant, yes, works, yes! Sometimes the function is more important than the form.

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