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Lights ON w/ Motion - Different Dim Levels for Time of Day

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    Lights ON w/ Motion - Different Dim Levels for Time of Day

    Greetings... trying to setup an event whereby upon motion detection my lights turn up to different dimming levels depending upon the time of day. I started by setting up 2 different events. The first of these works and the other doesn't despite many attempts. Screen shots:

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    Looking forward to the day when I can help those posting to this forum.... in the mean time.... Thanks a bunch!

    #2
    You are going across day boundaries which doesn't work in HS3. I believe this will be possible in HS4. I don't have any such even but you probably have to break that second event up into two events.

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      #3
      You could create a virtual device and turn it on at 8:00 AM for 15 hours and 30 minutes (or on at 8 AM and off at 11:30 PM) in one event. Then make the dim levels in your motion events dependent on the state of that device (and if virtual device on/and if virtual device off).

      Comment


        #4
        Malu is correct the time before is from 12.01 am to 7.59 am and the time after is 11.31 to 11.59 pm and this can not happen at the same time so the event will not trigger. Break the second event down in to:

        If time changes and becomes motion
        and if
        then time is before 7.59 am

        Or if
        If time changes and becomes motion
        and if
        then time is after 11.31 pm

        Then
        set the light to 10%

        Greig.
        Zwave = Z-Stick, 3xHSM100� 7xACT ZDM230, 1xEverspring SM103, 2xACT HomePro ZRP210.
        X10 = CM12U, 2xAM12, 1xAW10, 1 x TM13U, 1xMS13, 2xHR10, 2xSS13
        Other Hardware = ADI Ocelot + secu16, Global Cache GC100, RFXtrx433, 3 x Foscams.
        Plugings = RFXcom, ActiveBackup, Applied Digital Ocelot, BLDeviceMatrix, BLGarbage, BLLAN, Current Cost, Global Cache GC100,HSTouch Android, HSTouch Server, HSTouch Server Unlimited, NetCAM, PowerTrigger, SageWebcamXP, SqueezeBox, X10 CM11A/CM12U.
        Scripts =
        Various

        Comment


          #5
          You could also make the events compensate for longer/shorter days by triggering the virtual switch "ON" at sunset and "OFF" at sunrise. Name the virtual device "nighttime" and use it as a condition for multiple events ("and if nighttime ON").

          Comment


            #6
            I don't know at what level of complexity you would like to get to with the different levels, and I don't know if you have the Homeseer Dimmer with multiTap capabilities; but this is good info that you can use for ideas on one way to do it

            Randy explains how he did it and I used that as a base for my system.

            https://forums.homeseer.com/forum/ho...t-levels/page2

            Comment


              #7
              Cheers guys.... you've all given me a bunch of possible solutions to my predicament. I will start experimenting and post back which route I wind up taking.

              Comment


                #8
                Hi,
                been doing this for a while. I have two devices light brightness by motion and light brightness by user.

                I have three events that set both levels at 6 am, 10 am and 10 pm. They don't actually change the light, they are only references.
                Then since the switch has instant status I turn on the light either by user or motion and and the three events take care of the levels. And the changes are not dependent of the change of midnight.
                motion can be set to be dimmer than the pressing of the switch if I need more light. I use easytrigger to set the light level to the brightness devices.

                6 am is set to motion 20 user 35
                10 am set to motion74 user 75
                10pm set to motion 20 user 28


                Stuart


                Comment


                  #9
                  Thanks again for everyone's help on this.... I've now got a basic working setup... still room for improvement. I wound up using a virtual event as a reference:

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                  The events reference that virtual device:

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                  Now all that needs to be done is figure out a way to override the motion sensor if the dimmer is manually triggered. I think Stuart eludes to this, but I'm not sure I follow.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    We have many of our lights using default levels of Twilight, day, night and night asleep. I have written about it a number of times. Here is a place to start. This system has had a number of updates since I first wrote about it. The link to earlier posts is in this one.

                    With HomeSeer scene capable switches it is very easy to have the lights behave differently with local control vs motion control. We use a top press and hold to turn the lights on to default level and disable motion control with them on and a bottom press and hold to turn them off and disable motion control. A top double tap turns them on to full brightness, a bottom double tap returns them to default levels. I use a group of virtual devices to allow me to fine tune the default levels.

                    I use Easy Trigger schedules, because they are.... EASY

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I'm impressed with the programming, but I must say that "up double tap / bottom double tap" or "press and hold" and the like would never fly in my house unless they were ancillary operations . This is because I have a wife. Every switch must be intuitive. No exceptions. I can add in some "crap" that only I am interested in using, but at the fundamental level every switch must function as if it were an electrical device.

                      The true test of any "automation" is that it doesn't require anyone to learn to "fly" the house. Up must be on, down must be off. Press and hold for dimming is as far as it can go. My standard for any automation is whether a real estate agent could walk into the house and control the lights like there was no automation in place. If we go beyond that, or ignore the fundamental functionality of electrical devices, we are losing touch with the primary functionality of electrical devices that 99.9% of people expect.

                      Not to put too fine a point on it, but in most cases a "home automation" or "systems integration" system devalues a home. I love my systems, but if I were inclined to sell they would be the first thing to go.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I think most will agree with you. And that is why the single press up or down does something "ordinary". It's the long press/double press/triple press where things get fancy.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Alex_W View Post
                          I'm impressed with the programming, but I must say that "up double tap / bottom double tap" or "press and hold" and the like would never fly in my house unless they were ancillary operations . This is because I have a wife. Every switch must be intuitive. No exceptions. I can add in some "crap" that only I am interested in using, but at the fundamental level every switch must function as if it were an electrical device.

                          The true test of any "automation" is that it doesn't require anyone to learn to "fly" the house. Up must be on, down must be off. Press and hold for dimming is as far as it can go. My standard for any automation is whether a real estate agent could walk into the house and control the lights like there was no automation in place. If we go beyond that, or ignore the fundamental functionality of electrical devices, we are losing touch with the primary functionality of electrical devices that 99.9% of people expect.

                          Not to put too fine a point on it, but in most cases a "home automation" or "systems integration" system devalues a home. I love my systems, but if I were inclined to sell they would be the first thing to go.
                          The devices are intuitive. You walk in the room and touch the switch/dimmer to turn on or turn off. Motion will control the device as well. You can ramp up or down the dimmers manually, just as if they weren't automated. In that respect they work just as they should. If HomeSeer is shut down, everything still works manually. All I did was "add in some 'crap"' for overrides to normal function. Those ARE ancillary operations.

                          Anyone who uses our lighting has no idea there is automation behind it. Switches work like switches, dimmers like dimmers. The "crap" is consistent throughout the house and my wife uses and appreciates the ability to override motion control when needed or to double tap to get the lights bright on rare occasions. The automated part she really loves. Any lighting event is adjusted for time of day, activity, ambient light, etc. It is rare we even manually control a light in living or areas, but when we do it is a simple tap of a light switch just like any other home.

                          The primary point of my post was to address the question of the OP, to set lighting levels based upon factors, which my house has done (through several iterations) for several years.

                          If you follow what I post in these forums, everything I do with regard to automation is with a plan such that if automation is removed, there is a manual component. We have a wonderfully automated hydronic heating and hot water system, but if HomeSeer dies, it reverts to standard thermostat/servo control. If a houseguest wants a room warmer, they go to a thermostat and set it. If they want a light on or off, they control it at the lamp or the wall switch. The Harmony remotes control entertainment without regard for HomeSeer, but automation can adjust lighting and other things when these remotes are used. We do have 8 button remotes in several rooms for scenes or remote control of lights. If HomeSeer is down, they do not work.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            We share the same philosophy then. I'm currently replacing my first generation Z-wave devices so I can make associations that will function without a controller. I use URC remotes (I program them myself, I wouldn't pay for that service) and most of the events in my system involve scheduled lighting changes and irrigation. I use Android phones and wall mounted tablets with ImperiHome in several areas, but my wife has no interest in those. To be honest, automation is the only thing I use the phones for at all. They don't even have SIM cards installed. I just rooted them and placed them in charging stands as touchscreens.

                            My actual telephones are all wired to the wall as God intended. I have four early DTMF phones that I've restored. On two I've added a "message waiting" circuit and beehive lights. Two are early Princess models that I've modified to allow 12VDC LED illumination. I also have a rotary dial phone and a reproduction "kettle" phone. I use a device called a Tel-Lynx (unfortunately no longer available) to screen all incoming calls and to manage the white list of callers and messaging. The Tel-Lynx also converts pulse to DTMF allowing for the use of the rotary phone. Oh, and a red no-dial "Hot Line" phone with an internal dialer that calls the local pizza shop when I lift the handset. One huge advantage of using vintage telephones is that I can slam the phone when someone annoys me. It's very effective as many people have never experienced the sound of a phone being slammed in their ear. People also find it disconcerting when we answer the phone "Hello?" or ask who is calling (no caller ID). That's fun too.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              If I believe that the future will be more automation (AI) not less and if a modern home is built without CAT cables in place I don't know what is So not to confuse the topic at hand, I think you could use the the double tap feature to call upon other events not lights oriented. I could be wrong but hey, there is no such thing as one size fits all.

                              It's just my prerogative


                              Eman.
                              TinkerLand : Life's Choices,"No One Size Fits All"

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