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  • Wiring Help

    I bought the HS-WD100+ and the WA-100+ to replace my three-way switch arrangement in the hallway and have had a bear of a time trying to get it wired correctly. Essentially tried every combination and about all I could accomplish was the light staying on uncontrollable by the switch (though the switch did register in HomeSeer, was controllable, and status lights went up and down at the switch and the extension. I think to do that I had what appeared to be the neutral connected to neutral, red connected to traveler, black connected to load and white connected to line at the main and at the extension white connected to neutral and red connected to traveler. The only thing I did not try to do was connect multiple wires to any of the ports at either switch.

    Here is what the current wiring looks like now does anyone have any advice? I can get an electrician over but was trying to not spend $100+ to do what I should be able to do.

    Attached Files

  • #2
    What does the wiring at the light look like?
    HS 3.0.0.532: 1963 Devices 1141 Events
    Z-Wave 3.0.1.261: 122 Nodes on one Z-Net

    Comment


    • #3
      I can't easily get to that

      Comment


      • #4
        Do you know if the light between the two switches electrically or is at the end? There are a number of ways to wire 3-way (https://www.easy-do-it-yourself-home...g-diagram.html), and confirming by doing continuity tests is the best way to figure it out. If you have incandescent bulbs in the light, then an ohm meter will tell you on which wires the light is connected.
        HS 3.0.0.532: 1963 Devices 1141 Events
        Z-Wave 3.0.1.261: 122 Nodes on one Z-Net

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm not sure, going to use this as an excuse to get a voltage tester (voltmeter apparently isn't right for this application) Here's what it looks inside the boxes.
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            Looking at it again, it's either 3 or 5 but the colors aren't matching up on the 2 wire cable connection for the main switch. The other switch seems the same no matter what

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            • #7
              Originally posted by kideon View Post
              Looking at it again, it's either 3 or 5 but the colors aren't matching up on the 2 wire cable connection for the main switch. The other switch seems the same no matter what
              They may have used different colors. Ideally you can get access to the light to see. A Volt/Ohm Meter (VOM) is fine for this and you don't need to spend a lot. Here's an example: https://www.amazon.com/Neoteck-Multi...dp/B01NAVAT9S/. I don't have any experience with this one, but you can get similar ones at the local Home Depot, Lowes, etc. I use some extra wire and then measure using the Ohm meter with the breaker off to see which wire ends up where (test for very low resistance, but they could be connected at the light, so you need to be able to confirm that).
              HS 3.0.0.532: 1963 Devices 1141 Events
              Z-Wave 3.0.1.261: 122 Nodes on one Z-Net

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by kideon View Post
                I can't easily get to that
                I used a Kline voltage tester on each of the wires with the wires disconnected from the switch and the power turned on to figure out which one was the line and load and the rest was straight forward.




                Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
                Attached Files
                HS3 3.0.0.500 &HSTouch Designer 3.0.71 with 782 Devices, 479 Events
                Plugin's:
                BLBackup, BLOccupied, BLShutdown, EasyTrigger, Ecobee,
                EnvisaLink DSC, PHLocation, Pushover, SONOS, Blue Iris, UltraRachio3,
                weatherXML, Jon00 Alexa Helper, Network Monitor, Z-Wave 3.0.1.252

                Comment


                • #9
                  Is it even worth the hassle if there aren’t any neutral lines? I thought the neutral was jut a balance between load and line and connected through the panel. The extension switch only has a neutral and traveler wire. Also what’s more messed up is that I noticed after giving up and putting the old switches back the main switch will not work without the extension switch wired in...I am so friggin confused now...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The only thing I didn’t try was at the extension putting both the black and red wire into the neutral port on the switch. At least I know the red is the traveler wire. I could also undo the bundle and try to rewire both switches assuming the two wires coming down are from the light and the three are going to the extension. Even then I wouldn’t have a neutral right?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      kideon. Update - see post #12 below - your wiring looks odd and you may need an electrician.


                      HomeSeer dimmers / switches and their companion 3-way are wired quite unlike a "normal" 3 way.

                      In a normal 3 way configuration, you typically have Black (B) and Neutral (W) from the fuse-box to the first 3-way switch, and B, W, and Red (R) from the first 3-way to the second 3-way switch. The first 3-way switch will cause the B or the R to be "hot" depending on its position. The 2nd 3-way will either couple to the B or R and provide that as a connection to the bulb. Neutral (W) always stays neutral. This is typical, but not the only arrangement.

                      The important thing to realize is that either B or W can be a "Hot" wire.

                      HomeSeer dimmers / switches don't operate in this manner. For HomeSeer dimmers, the B, W from your fuse box goes to the switch and then B is selectively coupled to the load by the Switch . Only the B will ever be "Hot", the R never is. The R wire is, instead, used for simple signaling. Basically, each switch has a Traveler terminal which connects to a Traveler terminal on the companion 3-way and the R can be coupled by the companion switch to the neutral which i understand acts as a kind of low voltage signaling.

                      So, with HomeSeer, you do still re-use the R line, but in an entirely different way.

                      Take another look at the HomeSeer instructions - if you can't figure it out, I can try to sketch a quick diagram for you tomorrow and upload it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        kideon. I noticed something really odd with your wiring. Your first photo shows that your 3-way switch has the neutral (White) wire connected to it. You also have a white and a black wire connected by a wire nut -- these two things along make me say "call an electrician" as they are very unusual and possibly unsafe.

                        As a guess as to what *may* be going on, you may have your 3-way switches and light wired in an unusualy configuration in which power first goes to the light.
                        See "Alternate 3-Way Switching Wiring Diagram 1, NM" shown at
                        http://www.electrical101.com/3way-sw...-nm-cable.html
                        . I believe this means the White wire will
                        carry "hot" power rather than always remaining a neutral. If this is the case, the original electrician should have marked the wire with a pieces of black tape or other indicator that it was set up to be "hot" in some circumstances. I don't know if the HomeSeer switches can be properly used in this configuration.


                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jvm View Post
                          kideon. I noticed something really odd with your wiring. Your first photo shows that your 3-way switch has the neutral (White) wire connected to it. You also have a white and a black wire connected by a wire nut -- these two things along make me say "call an electrician" as they are very unusual and possibly unsafe.

                          As a guess as to what *may* be going on, you may have your 3-way switches and light wired in an unusualy configuration in which power first goes to the light.
                          See "Alternate 3-Way Switching Wiring Diagram 1, NM" shown at
                          http://www.electrical101.com/3way-sw...-nm-cable.html
                          . I believe this means the White wire will
                          carry "hot" power rather than always remaining a neutral. If this is the case, the original electrician should have marked the wire with a pieces of black tape or other indicator that it was set up to be "hot" in some circumstances. I don't know if the HomeSeer switches can be properly used in this configuration.

                          That is the wiring that was used and HomeSeer switches/dimmers cannot be used. If a neutral could be brought (preferably) into the box with 5 wires, they could work. The two conductor wire is line and load, with white most likely line. A neutral could alternately be brought into the box with the three wires, but you are going to need a neutral.

                          Randy Prade
                          Aurora, CO
                          Prades.net

                          PHLocation - Pushover - EasyTrigger - UltraECM3 - Ultra1Wire3 - Arduino

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Looks like a "Connecticut" 3-way. You might be hosed. These switch loop configurations aren't code acceptable any longer. You don't seem to have power coming to the switch but to the light. With these digital dimmers you need power coming to the switch and then to the light.
                            Originally posted by rprade
                            There is no rhyme or reason to the anarchy a defective Z-Wave device can cause

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                            • #15
                              I agree with everyone’s analysis. It explains why when I connected what I thought was the neutral to the main switch and the load from the light the light stayed on and was unresponsive while the switch remained powered and responsive. I’m shelving it for now and will revisit next time I have an electrician over it’s not worth two hundred bucks to make a hallway light controllable. Thanks for everyone’s feedback on this!

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