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  • Timon
    replied
    I think what I'm going to do is just get a HomeTroller ZEE S2 for now and run that for the next 5 or 6 months till the next sale is on. I can then upgrade to Pro after I've figured out what hardware I'm going to run on. It's a little more costly but I'll just chalk the extra cost up to a learning experience. Who knows maybe I would even need more than 5 plugins.

    It's too bad that you can't downgrade the ZEE S2 to a Z-NET or that the ZEE S2 doesn't have a setting to put it into Z-NET mode. Seems kinda dumb to have to purchase a whole new box that's running the exact same hardware just to get Z-Net functionally.

    So unless someone has a good reason not to go this way I'll put an order in before the special price go away.

    Leave a comment:


  • emiliosic
    replied
    Hello,

    I'm in a similar position, attempting to migrate from another controller. I was debating using other open source controller based on OpenZWave, but I'm giving HomeSeer a try mostly because I don't have as much time as I wanted to tinker with it.
    Already have one Linux PC running some VMs, and wanted to create another VM to run this. I can't get myself to get a small PC running Windows 24x7 as a server just for this.
    Ideally, want to run it on a VM, mapping a serial port to the USB Stick.
    Tried running it on CentOS 7 but while Mono seems to install correctly from the Ximian repos, can't get HomeSeer to start. It seems that it should work with Debian or Ubuntu. Any recommendations? Cannot find good resources on how to deploy it correctly.
    Also tried with a Debian 8 VM, and this time, HomeSeer starts, but cannot retrieve plugins (To install Z-Wave). What's the solution to this?
    Also Debian 8 ships with Mono 3, but looking at the forums (and then getting more confused) it seems it should be running Mono 4.
    Eventually this worked by installing all the packages on Ubuntu 8 as detailed here:
    https://forums.homeseer.com/showthread.php?t=188028

    Also, does HomeSeer have something like Lua scripting?

    Leave a comment:


  • Pete
    replied
    The Vera system has it's roots in a router OS called OpenWRT. It is an embedded appliance running much of its code in C. It is the core of some other automation hub's. That said too it is and what it can do is limited by a single threaded CPU and memory. I tinker with another device called the Almond + which is also based on OpenWRT. Only this device has a touchscreen. The core firmware of the Amazon Alexa, Samsung Smarthings, et al are are written in Linux. Tinkering here put the smalled OpenWRT router that I could find inside of my Leviton OmniPro 2 panel. While I am mostly using it as a router today it does talk to the OmniPro 2 panel via the network and serial interface. It is 2" X 1" in size and a miniature marvel. Imagine for a moment (well it does already exists) an automation server the size of a USB stick with a network port rather than a USB port on it. IE: you can run Homeseer 3 on an Intel stick just fine today. (and Android and Ubuntu).

    The Smart card is a tiny computer today with multiple CPUs, RAM and ROM. (off on a slight tangent).

    [ATTACH]61023[/ATTACH]

    In 1975 the smart card looked like this (when it was invented).

    [ATTACH]61022[/ATTACH]

    Today in 2017 the smart card has a whole little computer embedded in a piece of plastic. (imagine running automation from a smart card)

    [ATTACH]61021[/ATTACH]



    Over the years with HS2 / Windows server did work with some 16 serial port / 7 USB port devices. HS3 started here on Windows server. I always pushed it and always tried to break it. I did see OS BSOD's when first using the Insteon PLM (salad days).

    I am not knocking the point that Homeseer was written for Windows and that most / all plugins have their roots in a Windows OS and that it is easiest if you are familiar with Windows (here have used Windows since the beginning).

    Personally here purchased the first Homeseer Zee concurrent to first Homeseer Pro. I was amazed how well it ran on the first generation RPi. That said I then tested it on Intel / AMD based Linux boxes and it worked just fine. I do recall early conversations in the early 2000's with Rich about turning HS2 to an appliance based device (Hometroller and embedded XP) and did run HS2 as a service many years ago. (In the 80's it was CPM, Commodore, Apple, Radio Shack and later first generation Intel based computers).

    Today you do not need to see HS3 running and it truly does run in appliance mode on Linux of any type and any sort of CPU (Arm, Intel, AMD). I still use Windows server to run speaker dot exe as I have not seen a match to Windows SAPI to date. (not including cloud based text to speech / VR here).
    Last edited by Pete; May 6, 2017, 10:57 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • tenholde
    replied
    Just my 2 cents. HS3 was developed on and for Windows, with Linux appearing to be an after thought. All plugins are not supported under Linux. There appears to be many more on these boards able to respond to questions regarding HS3 on Windows.

    If you a very experienced in installing, maintaining, and debugging Linux installations, then you should have no problems.

    tenholde

    Leave a comment:


  • Kerat
    replied
    Yes, it will work but I have heard it is very limited in function. I would recommend parallels/virtual box to virtualize a Linux Linux distribution, and load it there.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • Timon
    replied
    I only wanted to do some basic testing on the Mac before moving to the actual system I was going to use. Having every feature working isn't a big deal. So would just running the Mac with MONO be good enough for that?

    So basically the Z-Net is a network version of a Z-Wave dongle. I like the idea but not sure I'd want to spend for it right now. Maybe later.

    Leave a comment:


  • gearyt
    replied
    I moved to Z-Net and Linux... ALL my problems went away after over 10 years and a good fight

    Leave a comment:


  • roussell
    replied
    Originally posted by Timon View Post
    I'm assuming that you download the Linux version to run HS3 under OS X with MONO. If I can get it up over a day or so I'll fell better spending the cash. Only problem is I don't have a bluetooth dongle but SmartHome is about two miles from me so I can run over and pick one up. Is the best one to stay with the HomeSeer SmartStick or is one of the other one a better option?

    I'd almost go with the HomeTroller to save the building but unfortunately they won't knock off a bit to cover the discount on right now for HS3.

    edit: I'm now thinking the Windows version but not sure. Guess I'll download both.
    Avoid HS on OSX/MACOS. The Log view doesn't work and there is no ETA to resolve. Somebody did compile a special version of a DLL, but it wasn't shared. Just load a Linux VM up in Virtualbox if you want to play before buying. If I had done that I would have saved several hundred dollars on a copy of HS that I don't use...

    Relevant URLS:
    https://forums.homeseer.com/showthread.php?t=164274
    https://forums.homeseer.com/bugzilla...ug.cgi?id=3365

    Terry

    Leave a comment:


  • askme
    replied
    Originally posted by S-F View Post
    The Z-Net is hands down the best option. If you don't want to spend the cash on it then I'd go with the HomeSeer Z-Wave stick thing. But really the Z-Net is great because you can put it anywhere, run HS in a virtual machine, etc. because it's an IP device. When I moved from Vera I got the Aeon Labs (or whatever they're called now) stick and it was absolute junk. I don't know how they get away with selling that POS. I had Z-Wave issues on a daily basis. All of that went away the minute I switched to the Z-Net.
    My Aeon Labs Z-stick has been rock solid for years. I would say the most solid out of all of the kit. Thank god as after various catastrophes at least my z-wave network was always saved on the stick.

    Leave a comment:


  • S-F
    replied
    The Z-Net is hands down the best option. If you don't want to spend the cash on it then I'd go with the HomeSeer Z-Wave stick thing. But really the Z-Net is great because you can put it anywhere, run HS in a virtual machine, etc. because it's an IP device. When I moved from Vera I got the Aeon Labs (or whatever they're called now) stick and it was absolute junk. I don't know how they get away with selling that POS. I had Z-Wave issues on a daily basis. All of that went away the minute I switched to the Z-Net.

    Leave a comment:


  • Timon
    replied
    I'm assuming that you download the Linux version to run HS3 under OS X with MONO. If I can get it up over a day or so I'll fell better spending the cash. Only problem is I don't have a Z-Wave dongle but SmartHome is about two miles from me so I can run over and pick one up. Is the best one to stay with the HomeSeer SmartStick or is one of the other one a better option?

    I'd almost go with the HomeTroller to save the building but unfortunately they won't knock off a bit to cover the discount on right now for HS3.

    edit: I'm now thinking the Windows version but not sure. Guess I'll download both.
    Last edited by Timon; May 5, 2017, 03:27 PM. Reason: Which version to download.

    Leave a comment:


  • langenet
    replied
    I pondered over the same question when I was about to migrate from HS2. I chose Windows and in hind sight, I'm glad I did because of plugin compatibility. My Windows has never BSOD'd. I find HS3 extremely stable on my system.

    Robert

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  • Pete
    replied
    Microsoft SAPI text to speech fonts can be run on your computer at home with no dependencies on the Internet. Voice recognition works and now Microsoft is pushing cloud Cortana.

    So relating to voice recognition you have MS SAPI, Amazon Alexa, Siri and Google voices.

    Running a Linux Oracle virtual box of Windows lets me run Windows only plugins remotely speaking to the mothership HS3 running in Linux.

    What is new with Homeseer 3 is that the plugins are portable. IE: run Z-Wave on an RPi2 which talks to the mothership. Run a few Windows only plugins on the Homeseer touch Windows 10 computer.

    Leave a comment:


  • S-F
    replied
    With Windows you will have access to more plugins as some don't run on Linux. I believe that most do but some are certainly dependent on Windows things. I find Windows to be pretty stable if you just leave it alone. My system hasn't had a glitch ever and it's been running for something like 7 years. That said, go ahead and run it on Linux if it makes you happy. You can always switch somewhere down the line I believe.

    As for RAM.... HS3 itself uses very little. Maybe a few 100 MB. Some plugins can gobble up a bit more. I think 4 GB for HS3 and a Windows system should be more than adequate.

    You can run a special build of HS3 on devices like the Pi but you will be limited to 5 plugins. So you're probably better off with x86 hardware.

    Congratulations on your liberation from Vera! That was the single best move I've made in my home automation life. God, Vera was a nightmare. Now things just work.

    EDIT:

    oOh yeah. Pete makes a good point there. The speaker.exe client runs on Windows. So if you like your home automation talking there's another vote for Windows.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pete
    replied
    Here purchased Homeseer 3 lite (Zee OS) and Homeseer 3 Pro. Use both.

    Moved Homeseer 3 Lite from the RPi Wheezy/Jessie to Pine64 / Xi5A for testing it on Ubuntu 16.04 64 bit. Runs faster now.

    Using Windows you are going to have to utilize AMD / Intel CPU's.

    With Linux today ou can run with ARM / Intel / AMD CPUs with Mono installed.

    You can also run Homeseer 3 on an Intel based MAC with Mono installed.

    I alway mention the more RAM the better.

    What works today for Homeseer 3 is 512 Mb, 1 Gb, 2 Gb on up.

    I wouldn't be surprised to see a dual core Mediatek CPU with much memory running Homeseer 3 in the future (say using OpenWRT on a box that is 2" X 2" X 1"). Here have been playing with a microrouter with OpenWRT OS and twice the memory and speed of previously tested microrouters.

    Running a linux 64bit build requires a minimum of 2Gb (that I can tell). Linux never breaks. Back in the HS2 days ran Homeseer on Wintel server. I could break it (BSOD) via the multiple hardware connections.

    Here utilize Ubuntu 16.04 / 64 bit / 16Gb / iSeries CPU machine for base OS for Homeseer 3 Pro. I custom DIY'd the hardware purchasing all of the pieces a la carte. (IE: motherboard, CPU, CUP fan, SSD, PicoPSU, et al).

    I take advantage of the 16Gb's and run an Oracle Windows Server virtual box for 4 SAPI instances of Homeseer Speaker. The Pine64/ Xi5A machines utilize the SAPI from the main mothership Wintel server virtual box.

    The above noted I am also running Homeseer 3 on an ARM based Pine64 with 2Gb running Ubuntu 16.04 64 bit and another mini computer called the Xi5A. The Xi5A is an AMD based mini computer with 2 Gb and an SSD drive (versus an SD card on the Pine64)

    For Homeseer touch clients I am using only Windows embedded and it does well for me. (also Windows 10 with some tweaking of the chatty kathy pieces of it).
    Last edited by Pete; May 5, 2017, 12:14 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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