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Rain8 program necessary?

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  • #16
    Thank you Hector.

    I went really very "slow" with it over the years. The trees all flowered at precisely the same time this year; even the new "baby" tree you see on the left.

    Can you have both HS and rain8 program run at same time?
    No; cuz they both talk to the same serial comm port. Like many other serial / USB connections to Homeseer I try if I can to first check comm with whatever the vendor for hardware provides; sometimes just using Microsoft Terminal works to validate comm.

    Homeseer/sprinkler plugin which is talking to the same serial comm port though cannot be running when I do this.

    Next step (for me) is if the Plugin provides some sort of diagnostics then I double check after booting up Homeseer and turning on and configuring the serial port. That and many also offer up debug so you can check comm.

    Over the years I have added a water meter to the feed for just the sprinkling system. This allows you to check on how many gallons of water you utilize for a watering. Next addition is an electronic shutoff valve dedicated to the sprinkling system. I do utilize multiple valves in various locations such that I can "tap" into the flow to check on stuff. BTW with a water meter you can designate how many gallons of water you want rather than the length of time for watering or use a combo of both devices. The water meter/electronic valve stuff would be utilized as Reid describes above such that you don't end up water 24/7 for days at a time.

    In Florida there was an issue with just water and not enough of it. The HOA (I was involved with it a while back) decided to utilize the older legacy wells in place, create a small pumping station and provide water via new water lines just for sprinkling the lawns which is free and covers some 50 homes there. The first house (built around 1958 or so) before the rebuilt did have a well / pump and such but it was removed with the tear down and rebuild (I should have left it in place).

    The initial requested additional funding was minimal and it took maybe 3 months to get it set up. To control the flow and use though the feeds and times of water availability is switched at the pump such that it cover one of three streets at a time. The water has much sulfur and you can smell it when folks are watering. Just recently I put a filter at the junction where the water comes to the sprinkler system feeds.
    - Pete

    Auto mator
    Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.534 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU - Mono 6.4X
    Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.534 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.4X

    X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation.

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    • #17
      Pete, aim kinda concern with the chance the sprinkler stay on all Nigth for some reason HS speaking, Can you give any advice what to do for any contingency plan for situation like this??
      Hector
      ____________________________________
      Win.2003 OS, HS3
      BLDSC,BLstat,BLRadar,BLRamdom,BLOccupied
      BLups,BLrain8,HSTouch,Ultrajones Weatherbug,
      MyTrigger,ACRF2,W800,Zwave
      AP800,Honeywell Stat

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      • #18
        BTW this whole "sprinkler control" thing to me is as important as the whole HVAC automation thing. It's just stuff that you don't want to break or quit working.

        There are a few ways:

        1 - program the timers in the Rain8 (as Reid mentions above)
        2 - water flow meter (check the water flow on just the sprinkler feeds)
        3 - electronic water flow valve (shut off the water flow on just the sprinkler feeds)
        4 - shut off the power to the rain8 nets (appliance module)
        5 - visual with cameras (which I do if I am not around) - cameras cover ever sprinkler zone today.

        Powering off the manifold power will make the valves default to off in case something happens. You could theoretically though have a broken pipe to the feed that goes to the manifold where there would be a leak. This is where an electronic valve would help. You get feedback from the controller; but what if that piece doesn't work and you cannot do a visual? This is where a water meter helps and an electronic valve helps.

        You can do a live test when you are set up your stuff.

        Just turn on one zone and shut off your computer and watch what happens.

        If the timers have kicked in on the Rain8's then you should be fine and the zone will automatically shut itself off.

        Without actually seeing this (a visual) a water flow meter would provide you with feedback confirming that there is no water flow.

        A valve stays closed because the surface area above the diaphragm is about two-and-half times larger than the pressurized surface area below the diaphragm. The difference causes a greater force above the diaphragm than below it. The valve traps the water, which fills the upper chamber. The valve will open only when the force above the diaphragm has been relieved. This will happen electrically when the controller energizes the solenoid or manually when you use the manual bleed.

        The solenoid is a coil of electrical wire that, when charged with an electrical current from the controller, creates a magnetic force and pulls up a small, metal plunger inside the valve. As the plunger rises, it dumps water from the chamber above the diaphragm to a lower (downstream) pressure area. This reduces the force above the diaphragm and the valve opens.

        To close a valve, the irrigation controller stops sending an electrical current to the solenoid. As the current terminates, the solenoid drops the plunger and stops the flow of water from above the diaphragm. The pressure above the diaphragm builds to a force greater than the pressure below the diaphragm, and the valve closes.

        This also occurs when you operate the valve manually. When you open the manual bleed screw, you relieve the force above the diaphragm either to the atmosphere or to the downstream side of the valve.

        Electricity and Water A variety of conditions can cause an irrigation valve to malfunction. But don't overlook the obvious. If the valve will not open, make sure you have turned on the water supply. You can check to make sure you have a water supply by manually opening or "bleeding" the valve.
        Last edited by Pete; May 6th, 2013, 07:31 AM.
        - Pete

        Auto mator
        Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.534 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU - Mono 6.4X
        Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.534 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.4X

        X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by reidfo View Post
          I would recommend installing the Rain8 config program though. It lets you program timers on the valves, so if HS crashes during watering the Rain8 will automatically shut off the valves after a certain period.
          So, you would set up the program timer to exactly the time the valves should be closed after HS sends signal to shut off valves?
          Hector
          ____________________________________
          Win.2003 OS, HS3
          BLDSC,BLstat,BLRadar,BLRamdom,BLOccupied
          BLups,BLrain8,HSTouch,Ultrajones Weatherbug,
          MyTrigger,ACRF2,W800,Zwave
          AP800,Honeywell Stat

          Comment

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