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Newbie - Omnipro II Wiring

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  • Newbie - Omnipro II Wiring

    What are the 8x "output" ports on the board used for? I know that one is used for the HAI thermastat.

    Why is only the "+" used in the zone wiring? What is the "-" used for?

    Are wireless Smoke detectors and wireless window sensors UL-listed?

    I have the owner's manual and installers manual. does anyone have any supplemental info they can provide? i have so many questions. (i also signed up for the 1-day training but appreciate help)

  • #2
    Sphinx,

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>What are the 8x "output" ports on the board used for? I know that one is used for the HAI thermastat.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    They are for whatever you want them for! The one for a thermostat is only if you have the thermostats and want to control them through the panel - if you don't have or don't want, then you have another output. These are voltage outputs - not relays, but pretty much just as good when connected properly. I use one looped back onto a zone input, and the output is configured to indicate when the panel is ready to arm, so now I have one zone to monitor that tells me if a door or window is open instead of each individual zone. You can connect a relay to the output to drive a larger voltage source if you like.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Why is only the "+" used in the zone wiring? What is the "-" used for?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    The zones detect when a sensor is open or closed by passing a small current through a wire. The current travels from the "-" terminal over to the "+" terminal. Out at the doors and windows where the sensors are, you put a resistor across the wire along with the sensor. Now, if the sensor is working properly, then when it is closed all of the current will pass through and the panel will know it is closed. When the sensor is open (you open the door) the current still passes through, but now it is going through the resistor so now the panel knows it is open. If somebody tries to cut your sensor wire, which would remove the resistor, then the panel knows because the current amount is changed yet again. This is why the resistors go out where the sensors are, not at the panel itself. The thermostat wiring uses only one wire on one of the connections to the output or the zone (can't remember which) because it is using it differently than its normal purpose and it gets a ground ("-") connection from the other one.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Are wireless Smoke detectors and wireless window sensors UL-listed?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I can't answer that one for certain. It would seem to me that like the panel, those would have separate UL listings and you would have to buy the ones that ARE UL listed or approved. Also, there would be a difference in whether it is UL approved (won't burn your house down) versis approved or listed for use in a fire/security application. I would think that they are, and probably have a method for indicating a low battery condition back to the receiver so you can keep the sensors in compliance with a good battery. Check with some of the home automation dealers that have security experience - Worthington Distribution or iAutomate.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>I have the owner's manual and installers manual. does anyone have any supplemental info they can provide? i have so many questions. (i also signed up for the 1-day training but appreciate help)<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Good resources, but they definitely don't tell you what a security professional knows, so it can be hard sometimes doing it yourself. The one day training will give you an excellent foothold on the product - may even be all you need. If you bought it from Worthington Distribution, they have a LOT of expertise on it since Tom Morgan worked for HAI for years. Good luck with it!


    Regards,

    Rick Tinker
    HomeSeer Technologies
    Regards,

    Rick Tinker (a.k.a. "Tink")

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Rick,

      Your comments and suggestions truly make this message board and homeseer an invaluable resource.

      1. interesting way of using it

      2. i'll reread the manual on UL-approved devices

      3. Regarding the zone input, it finally clicked after you've mentioned the reason for installing the resister. beautiful

      4. i have to agree as well. worthington distribution is truly a step above everyone else. reasonable prices and very good customer service. i'll drop them a line


      you've mentioned somewhere that you have 2 cartell's to detect if a car is coming or going. how did you wire that up? did you wire it directly to 2 zone inputs?

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, the two CarTell probes use two inputs, but they are connected to my Applied Digital SECU16I as at the time I hooked it up, there was no plug-in for my HAI system. (Hence my drive long ago to make that happen!)

        I set a flag when the first one is tripped and a delayed OFF command is set as well. When the other is tripped, and if the opposite probe's status is still ON, then I can tell the direction. The delayed OFF command is only a short period of time from the ON, so the whole thing resets itself fairly quickly.


        Regards,

        Rick Tinker
        HomeSeer Technologies
        Regards,

        Rick Tinker (a.k.a. "Tink")

        Comment


        • #5
          If I remember correctly, Worthington Solutions has instructions for hooking up 2 Cartell sensors to a HAI system, and the programming code needed for directional detection.

          My system is described in my profile.
          My system is described in my profile.

          Comment

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