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RF9518AW and LED's

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  • RF9518AW and LED's

    The Cooper specs states this switch works with Incandescent lights and the HS compatibility chart has a NO for Controls LED loads. Can that really be true that you can't control (ON / Off) an LED bulb with this switch? That seems crazy these days. Is anyone using these switches to control LED bulb's?

  • #2
    Not Me

    Originally posted by Gunneyk View Post
    The Cooper specs states this switch works with Incandescent lights and the HS compatibility chart has a NO for Controls LED loads. Can that really be true that you can't control (ON / Off) an LED bulb with this switch? That seems crazy these days. Is anyone using these switches to control LED bulb's?
    Cooper does not rate this for LEDs. Though with its specs it probably would on/off control multiple LEDs on a single circuit that totaled 60 watts (actual, not equivalent). Most non LED switches will on/off LEDs over a high minimum actual watt load.

    Lots of people must stick with halogen and high efficiency incandescents because of old wiring.

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    • #3
      I never realized there was a minimum rating for a switch. I am not sure I get that part. Is there something about this switch that requires it to have a certain amount of current when on to function? Isn't this simply an open or closed relay?

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      • #4
        Don't know..

        Originally posted by Gunneyk View Post
        I never realized there was a minimum rating for a switch. I am not sure I get that part. Is there something about this switch that requires it to have a certain amount of current when on to function? Isn't this simply an open or closed relay?
        I am far from an electrical engineer. It's just reading and trial & error. There is something about the interaction of LEDs and 110-120 AC current. Switches just seem to need a minimum load resistance for the interaction to the bulb/device and switch to work right. Some switches want only 5 (or less) watts for incandescent lights while 40 to 60 for LED (if at all). For LED control, switches seem to need to have magnetic or electrical low voltage control(?) Especially for dimming LEDs. I find the more LEDs (same brand and model) on a circuit the better and smoother the same LED rated switch will control it.

        Good LED performance and good HS3 both seem to prefer neutral wires and ground wires.

        I am sure many members can give a much more intelligent answer...

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        • #5
          Switch that does not require neutral requires resistive (incandescent) load as that is how it gets small trickle current needed to power z-wave electronics. It basically always leaks small current thru the bulb even when it is OFF. You cannot do this with LED load.

          You can use switch like 9501 which requires neutral and uses regular relays - that one can power LED, incandescent, CFL - any imaginable load.

          It gets tricky again if you want dimmer - there are multiple ways to create dimming on the load and different loads prefer different methods. So you need to be careful there. Again 2 wire dimmer will only handle resistive load. 3 wire dimmer MIGHT be able to handle LED but since it modulates output it will depend on the method it uses.

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          • #6
            Ah yes I seem to remember this now back from my UPB days. It isn't the load as much as it is the need to power the switch. That makes sense now and thanks for the light bulb (pun intended) moment.

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