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LED Xmas Lights & 2456D3 LampLinc V2

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  • LED Xmas Lights & 2456D3 LampLinc V2

    Have a small tree with LED bulbs, connected to the LampLinc. Even when switched off, the bulbs are still very dimly lit. Normal interaction of LED lights and this module? I could replace the LampLinc with an ApplianceLinc, but I like having the dimming capability.

  • #2
    This is expected as these dimmers (as well as other protocol dimmers) "leak" a bit of power which causes the issue you are seeing. In the past I've plugged a small night light into the same cord to "eat" this leak.
    -Rupp
    sigpic

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    • #3
      Originally posted by MikeMcM1956 View Post
      Have a small tree with LED bulbs, connected to the LampLinc. Even when switched off, the bulbs are still very dimly lit. Normal interaction of LED lights and this module? I could replace the LampLinc with an ApplianceLinc, but I like having the dimming capability.
      This issue can happen. Many dimmers still leak a small amount of current even when they are off. Not a problem with old incandescent light bulbs. Since LED lights us so little electricity the can light up with the small current leakage.

      One way to mitigate this is to add another load to the circuit. I have used a small incandescent nightlight.

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      • #4
        Rupp you are quick on the draw or in this case the clink.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by drhtmal View Post
          Rupp you are quick on the draw or in this case the clink.
          They call me Quick Draw McGraw (which will be lost on many younger members)
          -Rupp
          sigpic

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          • #6
            Just as info... the leakage as you call it, is actually an intentional feature called load detection. The module puts a very small current through the load which it uses to detect when you turn the lamp switch on or off.
            Flipping the lamp switch quickly Off then ON toggles the Insteon module. IE:

            -
            turn the lamp switch quickly Off-On while the Insteon module is OFF, the module turns itself ON and reports the status change to the master (HS, Hub, etc).
            -
            turn the lamp switch quickly Off-On while the Insteon module is ON, the module turns itself
            OFF and reports.

            That gives you local control of the lamp, while still keeping HS up to date and the lamp switch is always ON, ready for HS to control it remotely. Its really a very ingenious feature. It was undetectable when we had power hungry incandescent bulbs, but as you've said, LED's draw so little power that the detection current is enough to light them dimly. As already said, the solution is to add a small additional load - even a night light is enough. But that extra load just uses more electricity while the lights are on. On the other hand, LED's draw so little power, and are not a fire hazzard, so its hardly worth the price of an Insteon module to turn them off versus leaving them on 24/7....

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Burrington View Post
              Just as info... the leakage as you call it, is actually an intentional feature called load detection. The module puts a very small current through the load which it uses to detect when you turn the lamp switch on or off.
              Flipping the lamp switch quickly Off then ON toggles the Insteon module. IE:

              -
              turn the lamp switch quickly Off-On while the Insteon module is OFF, the module turns itself ON and reports the status change to the master (HS, Hub, etc).
              -
              turn the lamp switch quickly Off-On while the Insteon module is ON, the module turns itself
              OFF and reports.

              That gives you local control of the lamp, while still keeping HS up to date and the lamp switch is always ON, ready for HS to control it remotely. Its really a very ingenious feature. It was undetectable when we had power hungry incandescent bulbs, but as you've said, LED's draw so little power that the detection current is enough to light them dimly. As already said, the solution is to add a small additional load - even a night light is enough. But that extra load just uses more electricity while the lights are on. On the other hand, LED's draw so little power, and are not a fire hazzard, so its hardly worth the price of an Insteon module to turn them off versus leaving them on 24/7....
              Yep, most automation devices have been doing this since the X10 days.
              -Rupp
              sigpic

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Burrington View Post
                ...
                - [/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR][/LEFT]turn the lamp switch quickly Off-On while the Insteon module is OFF, the module turns itself ON and reports the status change to the master (HS, Hub, etc).
                -
                turn the lamp switch quickly Off-On while the Insteon module is ON, the module turns itself

                OFF and reports.
                I have 2 Dual Band Dual-Band LampLinc modules on my night stand lamps. They have LED bulbs. Turning then on/off rapidly does not turn them on. Is there something that needs to be set to make this happen.

                Edit: Duh. Someone like me who often tells people to read the manual did not read the manual where it states how to enable/disable load sensing.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Rupp View Post

                  They call me Quick Draw McGraw (which will be lost on many younger members)
                  I'm more like Baba Looey.....

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                  • #10
                    If the load is very small, like with LED's, the module may not be able to detect enough change in load to see you turning the switch on and off.

                    "
                    Turning then on/off rapidly does not turn them on."
                    Just to be clear, you have to turn the lamp switch Off, then back On again. Otherwise of course the lamp is off and won't go on no matter what the module is doing.


                    A thought: I wonder if disabling load sensing also turns off the sense current so the LED's don't stay lit - I've never tried it.

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                    • #11
                      I plug this into the end of the string, or anywhere on the circuit, it put's just enough draw to make it dimmer shut off
                      Blair

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                      • #12
                        Yep, most automation devices have been doing this since the X10 days.

                        A few years back went to using 300-500 LED lamp nets for outside. They worked well with the Black and Decker Freewire switches.

                        Wife did not like the garage gutter LED lighting so went back to incandescent C9 bulbs. Very delicate and always broke when taking them down / or putting them up.

                        Here this year trying little strings of LEDs in wreaths. They utilize 3 double AA batteries and have a timer and I have read that they last for 2-3 weeks. Users are doing these with rechargable batteries. Also trying a few sets here with little solar panels for a couple of bushes outside. These have programmable remote controls (but are IR rather than radio). Only thing is I cannot sync these like the X10 lighting. BUT no 120VAC is used for powering them outside. Still have one candlestick which is LED and still working. Never found same identical one though.
                        - Pete

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BlairG View Post
                          I plug this into the end of the string, or anywhere on the circuit, it put's just enough draw to make it dimmer shut off
                          A shunt capacitor, perfect. Any idea what the value and voltage is? I can just roll my own if I've got that info.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MikeMcM1956 View Post

                            A shunt capacitor, perfect. Any idea what the value and voltage is? I can just roll my own if I've got that info.
                            Nvm, found it. Pick up a few of these tomorrow at the local electronic parts outlet.
                            Attached Files

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                            • #15
                              I always found a flux capacitor to work in these situations. Of course you have to have 1.21 Gigawatts to activate.

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