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Help? Insteon 2413U seems to not be working anymore.

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    Help? Insteon 2413U seems to not be working anymore.

    Not sure why/what is going on.

    My Linux box certainly sees the USB drive 2413U as /dev/ttyUSB0 as it should.
    I have rebooted a number of times.

    I have tried older version of HS and the insteon plugin.

    using current versions (hs 3.0.0.206) and insteon plugin 3.0.5.35

    The plugin seems to be working.
    Anything I try that communicates with any devices just plain fails.

    Some for instances:
    Sep-26 12:43:15 AM Insteon Did not receive a response from Family Room FamilyRecp (17.99.5B). Try #5 failed.
    Sep-26 12:42:56 AM Insteon Did not receive a response from Out Front FrontPorchLight (0B.B1.FA). Try #5 failed.
    Sep-26 12:41:57 AM Insteon Did not receive a response from Kitchen RearPorchPanel (09.89.D8). Try #5 failed.


    Every device I try to test...it pings four times and fails every time.

    I am unsure what to do about this. I have included the Insteon error report if that helps.
    Attached Files

    #2
    Tim,
    i made your post a new thread, since it seems to be related more to insteon comm than a specific issue with the plugin.

    there is something on your insteon network blocking msgs (ups, power adapters, etc). try using an extension cord connected to the plm and plug it into a wall outlet close to another device, and see if you get a response.
    Mark

    HS3 Pro 3.0.0.534
    Hardware: Insteon Serial PLM | AD2USB for Vista Alarm | HAI Omnistat2 | 1-Wire HA7E | RFXrec433 | Dahua Cameras | LiftMaster Internet Gateway
    Plugins: Insteon (mine) | Vista Alarm (mine) | Omnistat 3 (by Kirby) | Ultra1Wire3 | RFXCOM | NetCAM | MyQ | BLRadar | BLDenon | Jon00 Charting
    Platform: HP h8-1360t, Windows Server 2012 R2, i7-3.4GHz, 16GB memory

    Comment


      #3
      Wow...freaky odd.

      I spent 90 minutes putzing around with this last night. Never got a signal out.

      I pulled the 2413U out of the wall socket, plugged in an ext cord and plugged it in along with a LampLincV2.

      I had to tell Homeseer to change to /dev/ttyUSB01 after yanking and re-inserting.

      It worked.

      I tried everything else...everything is working. What the hell? what would cause this? I am pretty sure I have not added anything UPS-like to the home.

      The wall socket has had for a long time the 2413U in one socket and a powerstrip with the laptop and a couple other odd item items (camcorder, second laptop)

      Is it possible, plugging in a second laptop to that power strip caused this?

      I think that is about the timing when it started...

      Thanks

      Comment


        #4
        Yes, its very likely that the second laptop power adapter could cause this problem. Had a similar issue with a printer adapter.

        unplug the adapter from the power strip and retest to see if the problem goes away
        Mark

        HS3 Pro 3.0.0.534
        Hardware: Insteon Serial PLM | AD2USB for Vista Alarm | HAI Omnistat2 | 1-Wire HA7E | RFXrec433 | Dahua Cameras | LiftMaster Internet Gateway
        Plugins: Insteon (mine) | Vista Alarm (mine) | Omnistat 3 (by Kirby) | Ultra1Wire3 | RFXCOM | NetCAM | MyQ | BLRadar | BLDenon | Jon00 Charting
        Platform: HP h8-1360t, Windows Server 2012 R2, i7-3.4GHz, 16GB memory

        Comment


          #5
          Insteon / X10 Signal Troubleshooting

          I agree with Mark, laptops and computers are real powerline signal killers. They usually have a very nice noise filter to protect their sensitive electronics, but that same filter kills Insteon and X10 signals. If unplugging your second laptop works, buy a "FilterLinc" from smarthome and plug everything except the PLM into it (max 10 amps). Keep the PLM (and any other Insteon or X10 modules) directly into the wall. The filterlinc isolates whatever is plugged into it from loading Insteon and X10 signals and will make your system MUCH stronger.

          In addition to laptops and desktops, other electronic loads such as UPS's, TV's, printers, satellite receivers, set-top boxes, video games, phone chargers, etc can load Insteon/X10 signals. In my experience (I have a signal level meter), most devices that have a switching power supply load Insteon/X10 signals, whereas most transformer based power supplies do not. You can tell if you have a switching power supply by looking at the label. If it has a wide input voltage range, say 100 to 240 VAC (sometimes it says "V~"), it is a switcher. If it has a narrow input voltage range, say 110 to 125 VAC, (or 220 VAC in Europe), it is likely transformer based. Interestingly, Apple products (iPad, iPhone) have switchers, but do NOT load Insteon/X10 signals (nice design guys!). So, if you are having signal problems, an easy first step is to unplug anything with a switching power supply, or better yet, put a filterlinc on them all.

          I have a number of track light strips with low voltage electronic transformers. Those also load X10/Insteon signals and create a lot of line noise. I had a problem where the lights would turn on fine, but would not turn off (when off they did not create any noise, but once turned on they loaded the signal and added noise to the system). The solution was a Leviton 6287 Noise Block which is small enough to mount right in the octagonal box above the light fixture.

          Another surprise was my LG fridge with a simple LED display on the front - HUGE signal killer, so it's now plugged into a filterlinc.

          Insteon/X10 signals are transmitted at 4 to 5 volts. It needs about 0.1 volts at the receiving end to work reliably. My HP laptop plugged in next to the PLM without a filter drops the transmitted signal to 0.5 volts (a 90% reduction!) and about 0.05 volts at the other end of the house, half of what's needed. Add a filterlinc and the signal goes out full strength, arriving at the end of the house at 1.4 volts. If the laptop is closer to the receiver, some devices in the house work fine and ones near the laptop are unresponsive. Things can also be very intermittent, depending on what else might be running. So, if you have these types of weird problems with Insteon or X10, the first thing to do is isolate the signal killers and put a filter on them.

          Anything that loads the Insteon/X10 signal WILL cause you problems whether you realize it or not. Insteon's strength is that it uses both powerline and RF signals to communicate (Dual-band devices only). It uses both to get messages through quickly, correctly and reliably. If your powerline signals are loaded by other devices, they may not be getting through and you may be working on RF only, leaving you with a much degraded system if there are also holes in your RF system. Non-dual-band devices such as I/OLincs use powerline signals only. Also, any noise or bad communications can add multiple retrys and that excessive traffic on the powerline side can disrupt the entire system even if the RF is ok. So you need both to be working well for a robust system.

          Most people have their computer equipment in one grouping, and maybe their A/V equipment in another grouping. So buy 2 FilterLincs and plug the whole power bar into it at each location - 95% chance you'll eliminate most of your problems. Doing so will massively improve the powerline signal levels and result in a much more robust, reliable and responsive Insteon/X10 system.

          Interesting note about power bars. I have some surge suppressor power bars that are Insteon/X10 signal killers all by themselves! They need to be plugged into a filterlinc. I also have some surge suppressor power bars that act like perfect Filterlincs and prevent bad loads like my laptop from killing the signal. The only way to tell is use a signal meter, or do a lot of trial and error.

          Couple notes about Filters:
          1) FilterLinc has a 10 amp rating. Don't exceed that or it blows the internal fuse (trust me). It is soldered in place (looks more like a resistor) and can be replaced if your're handy with a soldering iron.
          2) Be sure you plug the load into the bottom of the filterlinc. The outlet on the front is just a pass-through.
          3) If you need more than 10 amps, you can buy a 15 amp filter intended for X10, but they work just as well for Insteon.

          If you want to save yourself a bunch of time doing trial and error, buy a signal strength meter. I use an old "Monterey Instruments Powerline Signal Analyzer" (still available at Smarthome). It was designed for X10, but Insteon uses the same signals. It doesn't understand the Insteon codes, but it still shows signal strength and line noise which is what's really important. Makes it easy to identify Insteon/X10 signal killers, and isolate sources of noise.

          After eliminating the Insteon/X10 signal killers, I've gone from a total crap system to a very strong, fast, and reliable system. Also, all kinds of weird problems disappeared that I didn't even know were related to bad Insteon signals. I have 119 devices spread throughout 6500 sq ft. About half dual-band and half are just powerline. The lowest Comm Reliability is now 76% on one device. Most are 96-100% after 100,000+ commands.
          Last edited by Burrington; January 23, 2019, 01:12 PM.

          Comment


            #6
            Well, now, Burrington just read my mind. I have been having some reliability issues with certain Insteon units on the far side of my house from the PLM. Specifically, 9 units out of over 200, and they are all in my master bath, front entry, and laundry room. This sounds like a localized problem, but I can't think of anything in that area that might be fuzzing up the powerline.

            I have an old Elk, but it doesn't really tell me much. I would like to obtain that signal strength meter, how much is it?


            Jim Speiser
            35-year veteran of Home Automation
            Still don't know squat

            Comment


              #7
              Please refer to this link for more about the meter as well as more ideas to resolve your problem:

              http://board.homeseer.com/showthread...ne#post1226477

              Comment


                #8
                Thanx, I read that before, and I'm currently trying to localize the problem. I'm trying to avoid having to cut breakers. I think it's just weakness in the network, which is why I'm going to get a meter of some kind. Thanks again.


                Jim Speiser
                35-year veteran of Home Automation
                Still don't know squat

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by JimSpy View Post
                  Thanx, I read that before, and I'm currently trying to localize the problem. I'm trying to avoid having to cut breakers. I think it's just weakness in the network, which is why I'm going to get a meter of some kind. Thanks again.
                  I usually add more range extenders so you dump a stronger signal on the local wire near problem areas

                  Comment

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