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  • CheaperRFID via MQTT

    I built a variant of Tasmota 6.4.1 firmware that provides the interface function of the CheaperRFID hardware. It will report presence of lack of presence of a active RFID transmitter. Each transmitter will be mapped into HS device via mcsMQTT or other MQTT plugin.

    It is described in Section 15.16 of http://mcsSprinklers.com/mcsMQTT.pdf.

    This was an easy port of a similar interface for telephone CID that was previously done. Pete asked me to look into it.

  • #2
    Thank you Michael.

    - Pete

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    X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation.

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    • #3
      Where do we find the cheaperrfid? This was the closest I could see to it https://www.ananiahelectronics.com/

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      • #4
        I did not think they were even sold anymore. Your link does look to provide similar 8315 and 9315 hardware as what I have , but if memory serves me the price is much higher now.

        Ten years ago it was a good solution. Today there are alternatives like ESP32 Bluetooth or Lora depending upon the range one was trying to detect. If I recall the battery power transmitter was sold with lower range than the wall-powered one. If I recall the battery lifetime was not that good so applications where permanent mounting of the transmitter with alternate power source is the best choice.

        my prior xAP application for CheaperRFID supported both the 4 byte 8315 and 6 byte 9315. I did not port the decoding for t he extra two bytes for signal strength provided by the 9315. I found the signal strength did not help with the quality of the detection. Back in the day I was disappointed that the 9315 did not provide a better experience.

        433Mhz remotes are very cheap and likely could be put into service for a similar detection mechanism. I did quick look on Aliexpress https://www.aliexpress.com/item/3269...chweb201603_53 for $3 is a transmitter/receiver pair that could be interfaced to a microcontroller rather than a set of relays to provide presence detection. This may not be the closest to a low cost active RFID solution, but does provide the concept.

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        • #5
          Tell me more about LORA I remember us talking about it before. Really fascinated with that concept would also like to use it for direct notifications from the bat cave to the bat mobile for ultimate redundancy. ESP32s to be ordered soon that amazon wishlist is so large lol

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          • #6
            LoRa is like Zwave as it is a industry standard with one company having IP for the technology. it is 910 Mhz in USA. It has very low bandwidth and very long range. Line of sight is miles. in my case going through forest it is about 1000 ft.

            it is very popular in Europe and operates much like cell phone networks to have coverage through most of the continecont. Anybody can setup a gateway to extend ranges to where coverage does not exist. LoRaWAN in USA is pretty sparse. The Things Network is where you would search for this use.

            It can also be used point to point which is my use case to do things like getting remote mailbox notifications.

            Togo and Heltec produce modules in the $10 to $20 range that have ESP32, LoRa transceiver with antenna and a little screen for limited status.

            I would say they typically have neighborhood coverage with point to point so for presence detection it would be longer distances. There are also modules paired with GPS so position tracking is also possible.

            Lots of possibility but generally also DIY when looking for low cost applications.

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            • #7
              I have been looking for something to do with this old direct tv dish on the house...

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              • #8
                Here just have 12VDC old tags in the automobile headliners near the dome lamps. Been working fine now for years. Never touch it.

                Noticed too on the web site that the price is way higher than it was years ago.

                I have been recently tinkering with a 433Mhz LoRa 1 watt serial transciever (modem) with an 8Km range. Working well and priced at around $14 USD each.

                Ebyte E32-DTU-433L30

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                - Pete

                Auto mator
                Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.534 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU - Mono 6.4X
                Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.534 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.4X

                X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation.

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                • #9
                  433 Mhz is the authorized LoRa frequency for China. Do you know if it is legal in USA? 910/868 are reserved for USA and Europe respectively.

                  I took a look at AliExpress and the price has increased to $19. Still very reasonable.

                  Do you have info on the RS-232 interface protocol to send/receive data?

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                  • #10
                    ahh...yes they are still on Ebay for $14 at a buy it now price or probably cheaper if you make an offer.

                    E32-DTU-433L30 Lora Long Range RS232 RS485 SX1278 SX1276 1W Wireless Transceiver


                    There is no mention of the FCC requirements / legality here in the US on the Ebyte Web site for said product.

                    I got them with full 1/2 wave antennas and 12VDC power supplies.

                    There is a mention of the wireless serial protocal and speed adjustments but nothing much else which is autonomous from the serial to serial (RS232/485) speeds.

                    So by default the serial baud rate is set to 9600 and 2.4 kbps for the wireless transmission. There is also an address/ channel number setting.


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                    This device would work for remote RS-232 / RS-485 Leviton Omni Pro remote controllers. I am testing it with a cheaper RFID reciever in a garage with other side being in the basement server room.

                    Wow do not even see 433Mhz for LoRaWAN mentioned for China...or any other country.
                    China 779-787 MHz and 470-510 MHz

                    The Chinese 779-787 MHz band behaves similar to the European bands. The 779-787 MHz band also has three common 125 kHz channels (779.5, 779.7 and 779.9 MHz). The Chinese 470-510 MHz band behaves similar to the US bands. There are 96 uplink channels and 48 downlink channels. In some regions, a subset of these channels is used by China Electric Power and can therefore not be used for LoRaWAN. The Things Network uses the eleventh sub-band (number 10 if you start counting at 0).

                    Is 433MHz legal in USA?

                    2 Answers. The 433MHz band is not a general-purpose band in North America. This is regulated by FCC Part 15 (USA): ... If you were to use 433MHz for other purposes than the above, or 868MHz, you will have to apply for a license with FCC, which is then most likely restricted to a certain geographic area.Mar 21, 2017

                    § 15.240 Operation in the band 433.5– 434.5 MHz.
                    < (a) Operation under the provisions of this section is restricted to devices that use radio frequency energy to identify the contents of commercial shipping containers. Operations must be limited to commercial and industrial areas such as ports, rail terminals and warehouses.
                    - Pete

                    Auto mator
                    Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.534 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU - Mono 6.4X
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                    X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation.

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                    • #11
                      I am still not clear on how one would send or receive something? Do you just write to the serial port and it automatically is transmitted and the received serial just appears as the data is received?

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                      • #12
                        Do you just write to the serial port and it automatically is transmitted and the received serial just appears as the data is received?

                        Yes.

                        Works as if it was just a serial cable between a serial device and a computer. I guess that it is considered a wireless modem.

                        I tested it by connecting two terminal programs to each of the devices via their RS-232 ports. If I type on one terminal program see everything on the other terminal program or vice versa.

                        Then connected a cheaper RFID reciever to one modem and connected the other modem to a computer (well here Linux) and just did a cat to the serial port to see the cheaper RFID digits.
                        - Pete

                        Auto mator
                        Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.534 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU - Mono 6.4X
                        Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.534 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.4X

                        X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation.

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                        • #13
                          Will give it a try
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                          • #14
                            Good Price Michael. Don't you want two of them?

                            By the way the Ebyte E32-DTU-433L30 is the 1 watt radio (8KM range) and the L20 is the 100 mW radio with 3 Km range.

                            The Ebay link above is for the L30 1 watt transciever.

                            They look identical except for the label on the back side with tiny print.

                            These were shipped to me gratis and I did not know what exactly I had until I looked at the tiny print.
                            - Pete

                            Auto mator
                            Homeseer 3 Pro - 3.0.0.534 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e 64 bit Intel Haswell CPU - Mono 6.4X
                            Homeseer Zee2 (Lite) - 3.0.0.534 (Linux) - Ubuntu 18.04/W7e - CherryTrail x5-Z8350 BeeLink 4Gb BT3 Pro - Mono 6.4X

                            X10, UPB, Zigbee, ZWave and Wifi MQTT automation.

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                            • #15
                              I did get two with two buy it now orders. I am concerned about the transmit power. 1 watt may require a license to be legal. As I mentioned 433 is also not approved for this application. I am no expert on the subject, but no need to stress the regulators when just playing.

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