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DVD Profiler vs Movie theater

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  • Pete
    replied
    Go digital and never look back

    Hear! Hear!

    Transitioned from Microsoft Media Center (years ago) and DVD Profiler to all digital stored on one NAS box. Today do not transcode live streams as I prefer to only utilize LCD TV to watch movies (no tablets or phones).

    Got in to XBMC media center a few years back going to pure Linux players on Intel based digital engines. You always could create one common database for use with XBMC

    Stuck with Linux here keeping away from Android and recently have upgraded now to Linux modded TV HD 4K tiny TV boxes. (5 Watts)

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  • Mr_Resistor
    replied
    Go digital and never look back. I second using plex and Shields. Make your life a little easier and use an autoloader. I've had good success with an Acronova Nimbie USB. Just load a stack of 50-100 disks and press GO. Come back hours or days later, and load another stack. I've done a couple thousand DVDs, nearly a thousand BluRays, and several thousand CDs. For Video, I store an ISO, a Full Res MKV with all audio, and a portable full Video Res, Stereo rip for travel, remote streaming and streaming to rooms with no real multi-channel audio AV setup, just stereo (TV or soundbar), For audio, I do a full bitrate FLAC, and an HQ MP3, for portability.

    The WD Plex is fine, but it bogs down when having to transcode, which is Why I keep a pre-converted stereo version as well as a full audio version.

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  • keithj69
    replied
    Kodi can be setup with a mysql database so you can track content across multiple kodi clients. I use nvidia shields to do the heavy lifting of any transcoding if it is needed. Shields handle 4k and can passthrough atmos/dts:x to a receiver. The shields also has built in plex server/clients.

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  • devoir
    replied
    just haven't settled on which platform to use as the media server....

    Devoir

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  • Beowulf
    replied
    This is what I'm looking to do as well. Although I have some movies as iso, I plan to rip most of my collection fresh when we get set up with a NAS ( WD MyCloud Pro most likely ). We have a few hundred DVDs including many full TV series sets ( this I want to rip as individual episodes if I can ). I also have a dozen or so blu-ray but most of those include a DVD version of the movie so I may stick to that for my digitized collection...will have to see.

    I am a "special features" addict so of course I will also be storing all of those as separate items for viewing.

    The Plex server on the WD MyCloud has fantastic reviews for handling multiple Kodi clients so should be great for our home where prob never more than 2 watching plex content at a time.

    I know it's going to be time consuming to get all set up but I work out of my home so plan to just be ripping on the side as I'm going thru my days and figure it will be done before I know it. I did the same for most of my CD collection ( a few hundred discs there too ) before we packed to move 5 years ago and it wasn't too bad and having it all available at my fingertips now is great.

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  • lveatch
    replied
    makemkv also has a command line (makemkvcon) option allowing for scripting. Word of caution, blu-rays can get into the 16-30+ gb per track. IIRC, the largest makemkv track I've seen was 36gb, however, the majority are in the low 20gb.

    After using makemkv, consider using handbrake, which also has a command line option (HandBrakeCLI) where you can reduce your storage usage without much loss in quality. 36gb can be reduced to 12gb.

    DVD's are considerably smaller - 3.5 - 6.5gb (makemkv) and handbrake can reduce that in half.

    The best thing that my family and I like about the makemkv process / plex media server vs the iso's is that all of the movie trailers are removed from the beginning of playing the movie. Furthermore, if you want the movie extra's you have to select those tracks in makemkv.

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  • kideon
    replied
    That’s a good suggestion. I do have to offer one perspective here. If you rip iso you will preserve all of the content including menus extras etc. It’s literally a copy of the disc and can be played by kodi plex etc. Also you won’t have to spend the time converting so the process will be faster. You can actually by rippers on eBay and do more than one disc at a time. Personally I didn’t go this route, however, just wanted to throw it out there. Not knocking Keiths suggestion at all and it’s good to show you all of the options. Honestly if space were this cheap back then I would have done iso. Now near in mind one TB with the iso route will give you around 250 movies so you’re looking at 16+ TB. If you used a NAS that is doable in the price points given before.

    if I could offer unsolicited advice on the subject it may be a good idea to evaluate what you want to keep vs not. What’s available online vs not and if it’s practical to have such a large library. Honestly I do have a lot in digital storage that’s taking up space and needs to be culled that’s on the list of winter items to address.

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  • keithj69
    replied
    If you are wanting to play around with converting some disks to digital, try makemkv. You can update the beta license when it expires via the forum. Or I'll take one of those jukeboxes and I will buy you the license. Makemkv is a one for one copy. It is not an iso type thing where you get the actual disk and will be able to play the extras via the disks menu system. It can copy just the movie and what ever sound format you want.

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  • sparkman
    replied
    I started with HS almost 20 years ago in order to automate the playing of CDs in my two Sony 400CD carousels. There was an app called CDJ and an interface called a Slink-e from a company called Nirvis that provided a great way to integrate with HS. However, the company was bought out by Microsoft and development stopped. Sony dropped the Control-S interfaces from newer players and that's when I converted all my CDs to digital. Of course that's much easier than converting movies.

    EDIT: Just noticed that the Nirvis website is still up: https://www.nirvis.com/index.html

    Leave a comment:


  • devoir
    replied
    Kideon many thanks for the advise....now to figure out how to store 4300 movies.... ugg I have over 11 juke boxes...

    My work around was IR switching thru Xantech RT units with Proton TSU IR controller with user configurations for all of the switching...


    what format did you convert into?

    Leave a comment:


  • kideon
    replied
    Originally posted by devoir View Post
    Sony DCPCX995v DVD unit

    Sony BDP-CX960 blue ray unit

    Devoir
    You’re going to be out of luck with these it’s a Sony limitation with their IR control and serial / ip control lacking. I went through a similar predicament several years ago and wound up giving into the digital storage. It was a PITA ripping my entire library and a hardware investment for the server and software but worth it in the long run. You can make it easy on yourself and use plex to manage the library once it’s all done and storage is cheap enough to store everything bit for bit without compromise. It would be a $500-$1000 investment.

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  • devoir
    replied
    Sony DCPCX995v DVD unit

    Sony BDP-CX960 blue ray unit

    Devoir

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  • kideon
    replied
    Which model do you have?

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  • devoir
    replied
    Thanks Kideon

    I was hoping to keep the existing DVD Carousels vs moving them to a hard drive system....

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  • kideon
    replied
    There's a platform called Kalidescope out there it may give you a start.

    Leave a comment:

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