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  • bdraper
    replied
    Originally posted by rprade View Post
    In reading through the manuals, it looks like it is all or nothing when it comes to the type of zone wiring. I have to globally choose single end of line, double end of line, NC or NO. It looks like I cannot mix NC and NO devices for example. Is that correct or can zones be individually configured?
    I do not have a manual with me but I believe that is correct if you are talking about section [013], that would set it for the entire panel. However you could leave this set to "No End Of Line" and set the options on each zone, see section [101][9] for Zone 1, [102][9] for Zone 2 etc... I attached a few screen shots of these sections from the DSL software.
    Attached Files

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  • bdraper
    replied
    Originally posted by sparkman View Post
    There is also software available for programming and with it you can also backup and restore the config to a new board. It's called DLS and you can find it on this page: https://support.aartech.ca/index.php...mming-software. With it you need a connection to the serial port on the main board. You can build or buy the interface needed: https://www.aartech.ca/pclink-scw-ds...cable-kit.html. I have mine connected to a device server so I can run DLS anywhere on the network.

    Cheers
    Al
    I programmed my DSC alarm with the DLS 5 software. This software made it easy to program the panel in a windowed environment without having to enter a lot of commands at the keypad. The selections in the software provide help for the different options and make selection easier. This software will save you a lot of time, especially if you want to make minor changes to check functionality differences with the system. You will need to make sure you understand the difference between upload and download. To me it seems backwards...

    Good luck on your selection Randy.

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by S-F View Post
    A DSC panel will be cheaper and you will probably find more information floating around on how to program them for this reason. Programming one of these panels is NOT intuitive. Once you get the hang of it though it's no big deal.

    Are you using the DSC Lc-100-pi PIRs? That's what I've got. When my dog was younger the lowest pet immune setting was fine. Now in one room he can make the lights turn on. I'm wondering about the Bosch devices you've been mentioning. It looks like they have a sensor on the bottom so, theoretically, they could be mounted above a door and catch someone entering a room. True? If so, how well does the bottom mounted sensor work? For me the biggest issues with turning lights on via motion sensor is entering a room. It's very hard to place a motion sensor in such a location that it can see you as soon as you enter the room but can't see through the door and turn the associated light on when you walk by. I keep a spare 100' of 4 conductor cable that I wire to the panel and haul around the house to test sensor placement. I use a duct tape loop to temporarily fasten the sensor. I have had to move a few several times after some weeks of duty. There appears to be no good solution for my bedroom as the entrance is blocked by a bump out closet.

    As I have said, I see next to no delay with the cheap DSC PIRs. I have experimented extensively with this. When you configure them there is a red light which comes on upon sensing motion. I haven't been able to identify any significant (more than a fraction of a second) discrepancy between the light coming on and HS3 running an event. Although maybe the delay of a second is the norm and I'm just awesome. Everyone, let us not rule this last possibility out!

    Here are pictures of the Bosch straight PIR sensor. It has a single PIR sensor mounted st about a 30 degree angle. The "pet immunity" setting is a mechanical flap that restricts the vertical field of view.

    The Tritech sensors have the same single PIR, but their "pet immunity" settings are all electronic. The microwave sensor has two antennas etched into the vertical PC board, so I imagine it has a fairly broad field of detection, probably about 45 degrees or more in every direction relative to the circuit board.

    Click on any image for a larger version











    Leave a comment:


  • cheeryfool
    replied
    This seems to be a compelling reason to go with wired door / window sensors and concealed ones too for those with wooden frames and doors.

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by mikedr View Post
    Where are you planning on purchasing from?
    Since HomeSeer sells DSC products I won't mention a competing dealer. I did need to find a dealer who had a knowledgeable and reachable technical support staff. I chose the one who answered the phone and answered my questions.

    Leave a comment:


  • mikedr
    replied
    Where are you planning on purchasing from?

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    In reading through the manuals, it looks like it is all or nothing when it comes to the type of zone wiring. I have to globally choose single end of line, double end of line, NC or NO. It looks like I cannot mix NC and NO devices for example. Is that correct or can zones be individually configured?

    Leave a comment:


  • sparkman
    replied
    Originally posted by rprade View Post
    Thanks for that. It sounds like you are saying that you can add serial adapter to the board, connect it to a IP to serial adapter and leave it connected for programming changes without using the keypad. Is that correct?

    If that is true, it would be much more convenient than programming with the keypad. My understanding is that zone labels are stored in the keypad and that you can make changes to one keypad and "push" the changes out to additional keypads. If so, then it begs the question, does the software push the programming out to all keypads?

    I just want to try to understand all of the capabilities as well as limitations so that I don't make mistakes building out the system that are difficult to undo later. It seems like these panels were basically designed to be installed in a fully laid out system with little capability for future expansion. For example, is it difficult to add an expansion board 6 months down the road to a working system?
    That's correct, but before using the software to connect to the panel, you need to put the panel in download mode from a keypad. The zone labels as far as I understand are stored on the main board so no matter how you program it (keypad or software), it's pushed to all the keypads. It's easy to add expansion later. As an example, I started with a base PC1832, then replaced the main board with a new version that allowed for support of wireless CO sensors and then later added a wireless keypad along with a few wireless sensors.

    Cheers
    Al

    Leave a comment:


  • 519zwave
    replied
    I personally have done my WIRED system in 3 stages. Each time, just added expansion board, set jumpers, and added in new zones through keypad. Really pretty easy. I can see buying programming software to name zones, BUT since I named all in Envisalink and I really only use HS3 to operate it, named zones in keypad were not necessary for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by sparkman View Post
    There is also software available for programming and with it you can also backup and restore the config to a new board. It's called DLS and you can find it on this page: https://support.aartech.ca/index.php...mming-software. With it you need a connection to the serial port on the main board. You can build or buy the interface needed: https://www.aartech.ca/pclink-scw-ds...cable-kit.html. I have mine connected to a device server so I can run DLS anywhere on the network.

    Cheers
    Al
    Thanks for that. It sounds like you are saying that you can add serial adapter to the board, connect it to a IP to serial adapter and leave it connected for programming changes without using the keypad. Is that correct?

    If that is true, it would be much more convenient than programming with the keypad. My understanding is that zone labels are stored in the keypad and that you can make changes to one keypad and "push" the changes out to additional keypads. If so, then it begs the question, does the software push the programming out to all keypads?

    I just want to try to understand all of the capabilities as well as limitations so that I don't make mistakes building out the system that are difficult to undo later. It seems like these panels were basically designed to be installed in a fully laid out system with little capability for future expansion. For example, is it difficult to add an expansion board 6 months down the road to a working system?

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    I have an update from a phone call to tech support at the company I plan to purchase from. He seemed very comfortable with the programming and operation of the new version of the PC1864. Who knows if this information is correct?

    He said the v4.6 panel will handle a total of 64 zones, wired, wireless or hybrid. Further, he said that the wireless zones must be added last and that no wired zones can be added above wireless zones. He said the best bet is to leave wired zones assigned but vacant for future expansion, then add the wireless zones above that point. I don't see ever needing to have more than 64 zones total so this does not present a problem.

    The problem this seems to present is that I must purchase, assign and include 5 expansion boards if I want to reserve the first 48 for wired. If I don't do that there is no way to allow for future wired expansion.

    It would be really nice to know exactly how it works for planning, but I cannot seem to find any programming guides for v4.6 boards.

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by S-F View Post
    @ Randy,

    One thing to remember is that only zones 1 - 32 can be wireless devices so you may want to start your wired devices on zone 33 in case you later decide to add wireless door / window sensor. I should also add that the wireless motion sensors have a 3 second delay. This isn't something that you can get around. It's built in to them. So for our purposes they should be avoided.
    I'm glad you mentioned that, because it is an area of confusion for me that I was going to try to work out when I get the device. The panel I plan on getting is the PC1864. The sprecifications are
    • 8 on-board zones
    • Expandable to 64 hardwired zones
    • Expandable to 64 wireless zones
    • 4 PGM outputs: expandable to 14 (PC5204, PC5208)
    • Template programming
    • Connect up to 8 supervised keypads with keypad zones
    • 8 partitions
    • 500-event buffer

    I called the dealer for confirmation and he said it could handle 64 wired plus 64 wireless zones.

    The PC1832 specifications say it can handle a "total of 32 wired or wireless zones". There is a fair amount of ambiguity between those two statements.

    The programming guide is just about as clear as the programming methodology and I haven't read anything to really clarify what is really the case. I have seen statements that the wireless zones must be in the first 32. This statement in the specifications for the RFK5564 keypad may offer some clarification of the ambiguity

    "This RFK5564 keypad is just like the RFK5500 keypad, but the wireless receiver will allow the Power 1864 version 4.6 panels to be able to accept 64 wireless zones. You can still use this keypad on the 1616 and 1832, and older 1864 systems, but you will only be able to have up to 32 wireless zones. The wireless receiver built into the keypad will only allow the full 64 zones with the 1864 v4.6 panel. If not using the 1864 v4.6 panel, the receiver will only allow 64 wireless zones."

    That would seem to indicate that the PC1864 (assuming it is v4.6 firmware?) can then handle up to 64 wireless zones along with 64 wired zones. I would really like to know how this affects the programming before I order the panel. I will also confirm that the panel will be a v4.6 before I purchase. The screenshots below from the v4.1 and v4.6 manuals seem to answer part of the question.

    With regard to motion sensors, I have no desire to go with wireless. I have already wired in all of my PIRs, mostly the inexpensive DSC models, but a couple of the Bosch Tritech units on the driveway. I will probably put in some wired glass break detectors if we decide to go with a full security system.

    I just put in a whole set of Kidde interconnected smoke, heat and CO detectors. I have the SM120X and CO120X smoke and CO detector relay modules currently tied into Arduinos that I will move to wired zones in the panel.

    I will use wireless devices for doors and windows because they are reported to last 3-5 years on a single CR2032 battery. I may use a wired switch for the front and back door since they will be subjected to much more activity. For the garage, shed and workshop all of the devices will be wired and I plan to put an expansion board in each location. Right now my maximum wireless zone load is 14-16.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • S-F
    replied
    @ Randy,

    One thing to remember is that only zones 1 - 32 can be wireless devices so you may want to start your wired devices on zone 33 in case you later decide to add wireless door / window sensor. I should also add that the wireless motion sensors have a 3 second delay. This isn't something that you can get around. It's built in to them. So for our purposes they should be avoided.

    Leave a comment:


  • S-F
    replied
    Originally posted by mikedr View Post
    How is the performance with EnvisaLink?

    It's great. I couldn't ask for anything more from it.

    Leave a comment:


  • mikedr
    replied
    I've been following this post with interest, as I'm in the same boat as Randy. Some of the posts referred to Blade's plug-in, or the HomeSeer plug-in.

    Sadly, I'm running Linux, which means that serial port solutions are not available to me. Therefore, EnvisaLink is my only option.

    How is the performance with EnvisaLink?

    Leave a comment:

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