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  • sparkman
    replied
    There is also software available for programming and with it you can also backup and restore the config to a new board. It's called DLS and you can find it on this page: https://support.aartech.ca/index.php...mming-software. With it you need a connection to the serial port on the main board. You can build or buy the interface needed: https://www.aartech.ca/pclink-scw-ds...cable-kit.html. I have mine connected to a device server so I can run DLS anywhere on the network.

    Cheers
    Al
    Last edited by sparkman; December 16, 2015, 09:30 PM.

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  • S-F
    replied
    Originally posted by rprade View Post
    It is eight languages, default is English. I wasn't aware there were non-English keypads. Here is the product, does it lock correct? It is supposed to be a PK5500 with a wireless receiver.

    Looks good. When I was in the market a few years ago this wasn't an option.
    I think mine is an RFK5500E or some such. With the trailing "E" meaning a somewhat more natural language interface. Even with this feature programming the panel is odd......

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  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by S-F View Post
    I highly recommend you get the English keypad. It makes programming MUCH easier. Otherwise you need to be absolutely aware of what you're doing at all times. Is the RFK5564 an English keypad?
    It is eight languages, default is English. I wasn't aware there were non-English keypads. Here is the product, does it lock correct? It is supposed to be a PK5500 with a wireless receiver.

    Leave a comment:


  • S-F
    replied
    I highly recommend you get the English keypad. It makes programming MUCH easier. Otherwise you need to be absolutely aware of what you're doing at all times. Is the RFK5564 an English keypad?

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by 519zwave View Post
    Thanks. That is the company I planned to purchase from.

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  • 519zwave
    replied
    This is what I used to install and program mine:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfTdZ_xwGJk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Q_xYl9m7xk

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by 519zwave View Post
    Hi Randy,

    The status is almost instant to report back no motion as well. Same is true for door/window contacts both opened/closed. I'm happy to take a phone call from you if you want to ask anything else about the DSC or setup when time comes. I have the 1864 Board and 5 expansion modules.
    Thanks for the information and the offer.

    I have decided to go with an 1864 to offer the maximum expansion, an RFK5564 keypad with wireless support and an Envisalink EVL-4. As it is that time of year, I'll have to budget for it after the first of next year.

    That should be enough to get me started, learning the programming, interfacing with HomeSeer, etc. I have been perusing the programming manual and it does look a little awkward, but I'm sure it will make more sense with the actual hardware on hand.

    Once all of that is done, I will add some expansion boards. With the generous length of interconnect allowed, I can locate the main panel in my equipment closet and add expansion boards in remote locations around the house and outside buildings to save on zone cabling.

    Partitioning is a nice concept, because I can secure areas outside the living area, while I occupy the house.

    If all of this works out, I'll probably wish I went down this road last year as I was building out HomeSeer. Using a standalone security system makes a lot of sense. It looks like Eyes-on offers a some free services that are worth looking at and could even be leveraged as redundancy for HomeSeer for trouble notifications.

    The tough sell will be my wife, as she is skeeved out by cameras and motion detectors - the keypad may push her over the edge.

    Leave a comment:


  • 519zwave
    replied
    Hi Randy,

    The status is almost instant to report back no motion as well. Same is true for door/window contacts both opened/closed. I'm happy to take a phone call from you if you want to ask anything else about the DSC or setup when time comes. I have the 1864 Board and 5 expansion modules.

    Originally posted by rprade View Post
    OK, one more question specifically about DSC panels. I've been reading the installation manual and have not seen anything that would answer this. Are there any (for lack of a better description) "latch" times. By this I mean when a zone is made active by a PIR or any other device, does it immediately go inactive when the PIR returns to no motion or is it held for any reason? Does the zone device immediately and accurately reflect the status of the device connected to it?

    The one thing that I like about these hardwired motion sensors is the relatively instant transition from motion to no motion. From an event programming standpoint it makes it a lot easier to determine if there is active motion in a room.

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    OK, one more question specifically about DSC panels. I've been reading the installation manual and have not seen anything that would answer this. Are there any (for lack of a better description) "latch" times. By this I mean when a zone is made active by a PIR or any other device, does it immediately go inactive when the PIR returns to no motion or is it held for any reason? Does the zone device immediately and accurately reflect the status of the device connected to it?

    The one thing that I like about these hardwired motion sensors is the relatively instant transition from motion to no motion. From an event programming standpoint it makes it a lot easier to determine if there is active motion in a room.

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by S-F View Post
    Oh, One more thing.

    The statement made by Spud earlier "Each sensor is a Zone for the security system" is not entirely correct. Let me explain: Multiple sensors of any wired kind can be on the same zone if wired correctly. For example, my children have a rather large playroom with a somewhat abnormal geometry. One motion sensor wouldn't cut the mustard for keeping the lights on. I have three in that room. Two of them are ceiling mounted jobs (You can occasionally find great bargains on Paradox ceiling mounted PIRs on ebay!) and one is a regular DSC. All wired as one zone. If any one closes the zone closes. But in general, one motion sensor will cover a regularly shaped room. The alarm install folks poo poo this wiring technique because it makes troubleshooting difficult. If my playroom "zone" is always open or always closed three devices and the associated wiring between them would need to be tested. Here, at home in my house.... I am unconcerned. I built it. I can get to all of the wiring. I can pull any of the devices out of the circuit at any time and the rest will still function as normal.
    I have a couple of zones that are wired the same way, since they are NC devices, they are in series.

    That said I understood Spud to really be saying each Zone is a device, how I wire that zone is up to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by rmasonjr View Post
    Sort of an off-topic question. I've seen those DSC sensors on eBay for cheap. What gauge cabling are you using? Cat5 is getting to be fairly thick when bundled up in my hai panel.

    Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk
    I am using 22 gauge security wire. It is not twisted pair, it is four conductors in a white sheath. Pretty much the same as the old telephone wire we used when there were wired phones.

    I bought 1000' shipped for about $40.

    Leave a comment:


  • rmasonjr
    replied
    Sort of an off-topic question. I've seen those DSC sensors on eBay for cheap. What gauge cabling are you using? Cat5 is getting to be fairly thick when bundled up in my hai panel.

    Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • S-F
    replied
    I would like latitudinal data on the performance. Otherwise I'll just stick with what I've got as it works as best as possible. I might take this particular topic to CCT.... Since that's where all the nuts and bolts questions from here go.......

    Leave a comment:


  • rprade
    replied
    Originally posted by S-F View Post
    OK. I thought you had been speaking of something like this:
    http://smile.amazon.com/BOSCH-SECURI...bosch+tri+tech
    That is the Tritech model I have on the driveway. If I understand their model numbering, that is the 40 foot model. The ISC-BDL2-WP6G is the 20 foot model. Otherwise they're the same.

    I'll take the cover off one and get some pictures. The single PIR sensor is angled down. The Tritech models have the microwave antennas built into the vertical circuit board. The "window" on the bottom may be to provide more vertical visibility to the angled sensor.

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  • S-F
    replied
    Originally posted by rprade View Post
    The Bosch does not have a bottom facing sensor, it just has one. The Bosch lower cost PIR only has a little mechanical flap that optically masks the lower portion of its vertical field. The Tritech units use pulse count or other electronic means to provide pet immunity. I'll see if I can get some pictures of the PIR - it will make more sense.

    OK. I thought you had been speaking of something like this:
    http://smile.amazon.com/BOSCH-SECURI...bosch+tri+tech

    Leave a comment:

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