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Old July 1st, 2014, 05:12 PM
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Photo may offer clue in Amelia Earhart mystery: Report July 1, 2014

Photo may offer clue in Amelia Earhart mystery: Report

Published July 01, 2014
FoxNews.com




Quote:
A recently surfaced photo of Amelia Earhart’s plane, captured by the Miami Herald in 1937, could offer crucial evidence regarding the famous aviator’s disappearance.

The picture, snapped right before Earhart made her ill-fated second attempt to fly around the world, shows a lighter-colored patch of aluminum bolted onto Earhart’s plane that appears to match a piece of aluminum discovered by investigators on a remote Pacific Island in 1991, the Herald reports.

The metal plate, which experts assume was used to cover a broken window, does not appear in any other known photos of Earhart’s plane, according to the report.

The photo adds another twist to the controversy surrounding Earhart’s death. The aviation pioneer disappeared somewhere over the Pacific Ocean in 1937 during her second attempt to circumnavigate the globe by air.

Dozens of theories about the nature of Earhart’s death have sprung up over the years. It remains one of the most debated unsolved mysteries in America even today.

In Miami in 1937, the press gathered to see Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan embark on their flight around the world. Earhart’s plane had been undergoing repairs in Miami for a week before its departure. Ric Gillespie, a prominent Earhart investigator, believes that these repairs included the patching over of a broken rear window with an aluminum plate. The window had been specially installed so Noonan could navigate via the sun and stars but may have sustained damage during Earhart’s rough landing in Miami.

Gillespie is convinced he and his team discovered the same aluminum plate on the tiny Gardner Island in the Pacific in 1991. Upon the plate’s initial discovery, forensic analysis revealed it was made from a type of aluminum that was commonly used in the manufacturing of American airplanes during the 1930s.

Despite this evidence, the case remained open when further investigation showed the rivet patterns on the scrap did not match those on the metal used to make Earhart’s plane.

However, the Herald photo suggests the plate was not part of the plane’s original structure, but an add-on installed shortly before Earhart’s departure from Miami. If this piece of metal is in fact the same one Ric Gillespie and his team discovered, it would debunk the popular theory that Earhart simply crashed and sank into the Pacific Ocean, suggesting instead that she died after crash-landing on Gardner Island and finding herself stranded.

“The replacement of that window had to be done in Miami, at a Pan Am facility that was helping Earhart,” Gillespie told the Herald. “They may have used different materials than Lockheed ... If we can match that rivet pattern in the photo, I don’t see how anybody can argue against this anymore.”
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2014/...ystery-report/
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Old July 2nd, 2014, 09:58 AM
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Cool find - thanks for posting Pete!
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Old July 2nd, 2014, 10:55 AM
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I was always into that whole flying thing.

That and a relative did sort of piss off her parents in the 1930's flying and taking pictures of Africa when she was a teenager. Thinking more these days that it was just an adolescent love story to the extreme.

More pictures are attached.
Attached Images
  

Last edited by Pete; July 2nd, 2014 at 02:27 PM.
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Old October 30th, 2014, 08:44 PM
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Amelia Earhart plane fragment identified

By Rossella Lorenzi Published October 29, 2014








A fragment of Amelia Earhart's lost aircraft has been identified to a high degree of certainty for the first time ever since her plane vanished over the Pacific Ocean on July 2, 1937, in a record attempt to fly around the world at the equator.

New research strongly suggests that a piece of aluminum aircraft debris recovered in 1991 from Nikumaroro, an uninhabited atoll in the southwestern Pacific republic of Kiribati, does belong to Earhart’s twin-engined Lockheed Electra.

The search for Amelia Earhart is about to continue in the pristine waters of a tiny uninhabited island, Nikumaroro, between Hawaii and Australia.

According to researchers at The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), which has long been investigating the last, fateful flight taken by Earhart 77 years ago, the aluminum sheet is a patch of metal installed on the Electra during the aviator’s eight-day stay in Miami, which was the fourth stop on her attempt to circumnavigate the globe.

A fragment of Amelia Earhart's lost aircraft has been identified to a high degree of certainty for the first time ever since her plane vanished over the Pacific Ocean on July 2, 1937, in a record attempt to fly around the world at the equator.

New research strongly suggests that a piece of aluminum aircraft debris recovered in 1991 from Nikumaroro, an uninhabited atoll in the southwestern Pacific republic of Kiribati, does belong to Earhart’s twin-engined Lockheed Electra.

The search for Amelia Earhart is about to continue in the pristine waters of a tiny uninhabited island, Nikumaroro, between Hawaii and Australia.

According to researchers at The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), which has long been investigating the last, fateful flight taken by Earhart 77 years ago, the aluminum sheet is a patch of metal installed on the Electra during the aviator’s eight-day stay in Miami, which was the fourth stop on her attempt to circumnavigate the globe.

“This is the first time an artifact found on Nikumaroro has been shown to have a direct link to Amelia Earhart,” Gillespie said.

The breakthrough would prove that, contrary to what was generally believed, Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, did not crash in the Pacific Ocean, running out of fuel somewhere near their target destination of Howland Island.

Instead, they made a forced landing on Nikumaroro's smooth, flat coral reef. The two became castaways and eventually died on the atoll, which is some 350 miles southeast of Howland Island.

In 10 archaeological expeditions to Nikumaroro, Gillespie and his team uncovered a number of artifacts which, combined with archival research, provide strong circumstantial evidence for a castaway presence.

“Earhart sent radio distress calls for at least five nights before the Electra was washed into the ocean by rising tides and surf,” Gillespie said.

The search for Amelia Earhart is about to continue in the pristine waters of a tiny uninhabited island, Nikumaroro, between Hawaii and Australia.

Previous research on a photograph of Nikumaroro's western shoreline taken three months after Earhart's disappearance revealed an unexplained object protruding from the water on the fringing reef.

Photos: Jars Hint at Amelia Earhart as Castaway

Forensic imaging analyses of the photo suggested that the shape and dimension of the object are consistent with the landing gear of a Lockheed Electra.

Moreover, an “anomaly” that might possibly be the wreckage of Amelia Earhart's aircraft emerged from analysis of the sonar imagery captured off Nikumaroro during TIGHAR’s last expedition.

The object rests at a depth of 600 feet at the base of a cliff just offshore where, according to TIGHAR, the Electra was washed into the ocean. An analysis of the anomaly by Ocean Imaging Consultants, Inc. of Honolulu, experts in post-processing sonar data, revealed the anomaly to be the right size and shape to be the fuselage of Earhart’s aircraft.

The new research on Artifact 2-2-V-1 may reinforce the possibility that the anomaly is the rest of the aircraft.

Photos: Inside the Search for Amelia Earhart

“The many fractures, tears, dents and gouges found on this battered sheet of aluminum may be important clues to the fate and resting place of the Electra,” Gillespie said.

In June 2015, TIGHAR will return to Nikumaroro to investigate the anomaly with Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) technology supported by Nai’a, a 120-foot Fiji-based vessel that has served five previous TIGHAR explorations.

During the 24-day expedition, divers will search for other wreckage at shallower depths and an onshore search team will seek to identify objects detected in historical photographs that may be relics of an initial survival camp.

“Funding is being sought, in part, from individuals who will make a substantial contribution in return for a place on the expedition team,” Gillespie said.
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Old October 31st, 2014, 03:52 AM
AshaiRey AshaiRey is offline
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I've seen some of these pictures before and i know the stories this far but now i had time to take a better look at the airplane and i find it a very beautiful design. (Sorry i had to say this)
Pete, thanks for sharing this.
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Old October 31st, 2014, 11:31 AM
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Technology / History is an amazing thing.

From what I have read; Amelia Earhart was an amazing women.

Yeah too; I would have been pissed off if I was getting ready to fly in my plane (liking and being used to my environment in the sky) if some last minute hardware change happened (well like replacing a window with some piece of metal) while getting ready to fly. Maybe some day though we will know the what and why of what happened.

There is always a reason.

Amelia Earhart's plane discovered ... in old movie



Mark Twain said: "History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme."

The plane Amelia Earhart was flying when she disappeared over the Pacific has been discovered … in a 1936 Clark Gable film. Discovery News reports that researchers with the International Group of Historic Aircraft Recovery spotted Earhart's Lockheed Electra—given away by the registration number on its wing—in the 1936 film Love on the Run.

It appears that even official Earhart biographers were unaware of the famous plane's star turn. In the film, the Lockheed carrying Gable and Joan Crawford narrowly avoids running into a crowd of spectators during a comically rough takeoff.

("I wonder what all those gadgets are for?" asks Gable upon surveying the cockpit.) You can watch the scene

vaunted new 'Flying Laboratory' was kept quiet," the group known as TIGHAR states on its Facebook page.

Love on the Run debuted about eight months before Earhart's disappearance in July 1937. Stunt pilot Paul Mantz, who also served as Earhart's technical adviser, performed the takeoff in the film.

The plane was delivered to Earhart on her 39th birthday on July 24, 1936, within weeks of the scene being filmed. It's unclear if she knew it was used in the movie.

TIGHAR, meanwhile, is preparing a new submersible-led mission in hopes of finding Earhart's plane in the summer of 2017. (In an old photo, investigators spotted a repair made to the plane that may provide a clue.)

Last edited by Pete; July 5th, 2017 at 05:43 PM.
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Old July 5th, 2017, 05:35 PM
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Is this Amelia Earheart?

Does newly discovered photo reveal that Amelia Earhart survived crash to become Japanese prisoner?

By James Rogers
Published July 05, 2017

Name:  AE.jpg
Views: 86
Size:  202.7 KB

The disappearance of Amelia Earhart is one of the great unsolved mysteries, although a recently-discovered photo is being touted as a vital clue to the aviation pioneer’s fate.

Earhart, who was attempting to fly around the world, disappeared on July 2, 1937 during a flight from Papua New Guinea to Howland Island in the Pacific. Researchers claim that new evidence from U.S. Government archives may finally solve the mystery of what happened to the record-breaking pilot.

A two-hour documentary “Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence” will reveal the documents when it airs on the History channel July 9. Investigators will present the theory that Earhart survived her final flight after crash-landing in the Marshall Islands. The aviator, they say, was then captured by the Japanese military and died in their custody on the island of Saipan. The investigators also claim that the U.S. government may have covered up Earhart’s fate, citing the possibility that she was on a spying mission.

The Japanese government has not yet responded to a request for comment on this story from Fox News.

A photograph, which purportedly shows Earhart, her navigator Fred Noonan and their ill-fated plane after the crash, is presented as a critical piece of evidence in the documentary. The photo was found within the U.S. National Archives by Les Kinney, a former U.S. Treasury Agent. “The photograph came out of a Navy file, a formerly top secret file in the National Archives,” says Kinney, during the documentary. “It was misfiled and that was the only reason I found it.”

The photo of a group of people on a Marshall Islands dock shows Earhart sitting with her back to the camera, according to Kinney. “Look at the body, the build, the short hair, the fact that she’s Caucasian,” he explained, adding that the tall man on the left of the group is Noonan.

Earhart’s plane is said to be on a barge in the far right of the picture, which was tested with recognition and proportional comparison technology.

The documentary also focuses on plane parts found on Mili Atoll in the Marshall Islands that are said to be consistent with the aircraft Earhart was flying in 1937.

However, Dorothy Cochrane, curator in the Aeronautics department of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum told Fox News there is no evidence that Earhart was sent out on a spying mission. Cochrane, who has not yet seen the new documentary says that unravelling the Earhart mystery remains incredibly difficult. “There’s no definite evidence that anyone has got as to where she ended up,” she said.

The first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, Earhart was one of the most famous people at the time of her disappearance. A number of theories have emerged about her fate.

One theory is that Earhart died a castaway after landing her plane on the remote island of Nikumaroro, a coral atoll some 1,200 miles from the Marshall Islands. Some 13 human bones were found on Nikumaroro, which is also known as Gardner Island, three years after Earhart’s disappearance. The bones, however, were subsequently lost. A new search for other bones on the island was recently launched.
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Old July 6th, 2017, 11:21 AM
avpman avpman is offline
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Purchase photos?

Great photos. Do you happen to know if/where I can purchase prints of the originals?
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Old July 6th, 2017, 05:20 PM
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Reading another article which seems to push a sort of faux pas advertisement for the History channel.

Here started to post about Amelia Earhart around 2014...and just added this news to the thread I started.
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Old July 6th, 2017, 05:27 PM
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Amelia Earhart: Does photo show she died a Japanese prisoner?

A newly-discovered photo suggests legendary US pilot Amelia Earhart might have died in Japanese custody - and not in a plane crash in the Pacific.
If true, it would solve one of aviation history's biggest mysteries.

Earhart vanished during a 1937 flight over the Pacific - and her disappearance has been a breeding ground for speculation ever since.
A photograph from the 1930s shows a figure that could be her, taken on the then-Japanese Marshall Islands.


However, at least one prominent expert has poured cold water on the claim, saying he was "astounded" it had taken off.


The new material - presented as evidence for an old theory - is a black-and-white photograph found in the vaults of the US National Archives.



It shows a group of people standing on a dock. The label on the photograph says it was taken on Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands, presumably by a US spy.


The link might seem thin, though, to the legendary pilot who five years before her disappearance had risen to fame as the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic.


The claim is that one seated person with her back to the camera could be Earhart, while another figure on the far left in the photo is said to be Fred Noonan, her navigator on that last flight.


On the very right of the picture is a blurry section which, it is claimed, shows Earhart's plane.


Ric Gillespie, author of Finding Amelia and executive director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), is certainly unconvinced.


He told the BBC: "This photograph has people convinced. I'm astounded by this. I mean, my God! Look at this photograph... Let's use our heads for a moment. It's undated. They think it's from 1937. Okay. If it's from July 1, 1937 then it can't be Amelia, because she hadn't taken off yet.



"If it's from 1935 or 1938 it can't be her.... This photograph has to have been taken within a very narrow window - within a couple of days of when she disappeared."


He notes that the photograph came from an Office of Naval Intelligence file, saying it was "very natural" the US would want a picture of this Japanese naval asset.


"And what does the photo say that it shows? ... Jaluit Atoll - Jaluit Island. It doesn't say 'Amelia Earhart in Japanese custody'!


"If this is a picture of Amelia Earhart in Japanese custody, where are the Japanese? There are no soldiers in this picture. Nobody in uniform," he observes.


The photograph was released by the US-based History channel ahead of a documentary to run this weekend. If the goal was to drum up attention - and hence audience numbers - it appears to have paid off.



A preview of the programme has two experts backing up the claim by looking at the torso measurements of the woman alleged to be Amelia Earhart in the photo, and teeth and hairline of the figure claimed to be Fred Noonan.



Mystery hunters and stories

A far stretch? After all, the heroine has her back to the camera and it's debatable how much of a hairline let alone teeth can really be made out reliably on a faded photograph from the 1930s.
Mr Gillespie says it doesn't match other known pictures of the famous aviator.



"The person who they say is Amelia Earhart might be a white woman. But her hair is way too long to be Amelia's. We have many pictures of Earhart taken the day before she took off, and her hair's a lot shorter than that."


He adds that the man identified as Fred Noonan does not, in his view, resemble the navigator. Further, his shirt is the wrong colour.
"The man is dressed in white. Noonan always wore dark shirts and dark slacks. Amelia didn't have a shirt like that with her on the trip either. So the Japanese have apparently given them new clothes.
"Everything about this is wrong," he concludes. "I'm astounded."
Did she crash on land?

Scepticism aside, the alleged scoop feeds into one of the existing theories about what happened to Earhart and her navigator.


She disappeared during her attempt to fly around the globe, trying to reach Howland Island in the Pacific for refueling.



The official explanation is that she didn't find the island, lost communication and ran out of fuel, only to crash into the ocean.
While that's a largely accepted version of events, there is no evidence - as in debris - to back it up.


The two other prominent theories are that Earhart crash-landed on or near the then-Japanese Marshall Islands, or that she made it to Nikumaroro island near Kiribati and died a castaway there.


There is no conclusive evidence for either of these theories - but that hasn't stopped amateur and professional historians from digging into them.


Parts of a skeleton found on Nikumaroro in 1940 were initially thought to have been hers, but doctors at the time decided they belonged to a male body.



Mr Gillespie, who backs the Nikumaroro theory, has led 11 expeditions in the South Pacific to research Earhart's fate. He points out that the island was uninhabited at the time when Earhart would have landed there.


He and his team have recovered artifacts which they say strongly suggest the presence of an American woman from the right era - including a makeup box from the 1930s, a popular US women's moisturizer, and a jacket zipper.


Mr Gillespie also cites the timing and location of radio distress calls sent by Earhart after her plane came down. He says the calls were sent "night after night" - which would suggest the plane was on land, not in the water - because if the radios got wet, they wouldn't work.



"After six nights the radio signals stopped," he told the BBC. "We now think that's because the airplane was landed on the reef round the island, which is flat, smooth - dries at low tide... But the tide does come in and go out, and ... by the sixth night [he believes] the aeroplane was washed into the ocean by the tides.



"So when the planes from the battleship flew over the island a week later, no plane was visible."



The rest of the search took place in open ocean, and found nothing. The would-be rescuers concluded that Earhart and Noonan had sunk without a trace.


A mystery still unsolved

The conclusion drawn by the History documentary, based on the new Marshall Islands picture, is that Earhart was taken by the Japanese, later interned and eventually died a prisoner of war.



The Marshall Islands went from German to Japanese hands during World War One, and ahead of the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor became an important military post for Tokyo.



The Japanese archives have no records of Earhart as a prisoner - but with many documents from these archives known to have been lost, this does not necessarily prove the story wrong.



At the same time, the discovery of a single photograph that may or may not show the two lost pilots is likely to add to the mystery rather than solve it.
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